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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: [OT] not panos but ... photos

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  • Fernando Costa Pinto
    Dears Vetiver is absolutely not invasive . That is one of the major points in favour of the plant. Indeed the difficulty in propagation ( traditional ) is an
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 19, 2011
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      Dears

      Vetiver is absolutely not invasive . That is one of the major points in
      favour of the plant.
      Indeed the difficulty in propagation ( traditional ) is an obstacle to large
      implementation. Propagation In Vitro solves that problem.

      Fernando
      Salvador Bahia
      Brazil



      On Fri, Feb 18, 2011 at 8:49 AM, Rodolpho Pajuaba <rpajuaba@...>wrote:

      >
      >
      > This was the first thing I thought when I read about it. Reminded me
      > of that plant that escaped from acquariums and infested the
      > Mediterranean.
      >
      > 2011/2/17 John Riley <johnriley@...>:
      >
      > > On Feb 12, 2011, at 2:39 PM, Fernando Costa Pinto wrote:
      > >
      > >> Great... Ayrton...
      > >> This is a Very important subject..lives can be saved by this plant ..it
      > >> only needs to be more and more publicized !
      > >> Please take a look in one comment to the photos from a Brazilian, in
      > >> another group where i belong vetiver-system@...
      > >
      > >
      > > I hope that it is non-invasive, as described on Wikipedia. Living in the
      > southeastern U.S., I can only be reminded of kudzu. Kudzu is the Terminator
      > of the plant kingdom! "That terminator kudzu is out there. It can't be
      > bargained with. It can't be reasoned with. It doesn't feel pity, or remorse,
      > or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until even after you are
      > dead." The kudzu (native to Japan) was planted to fight the horrible
      > erosion of abandoned farmland where relentless cotton cultivation had
      > destroyed the soil. Without any natural enemy, it sometimes grows a foot or
      > more overnight, will engulf a house before you know it, kill entire stands
      > of trees, maybe even wrap you up while you are sleeping. You can dig it up,
      > cut it, poison it, or burn it, but it keeps coming back.
      > >
      > > You know the old saying: "If you can't beat them, you might as well join
      > them."? My home county (Union, SC) is so thick with kudzu that they started
      > a Kudzu Festival. People try to promote recipes to cook it, artists hawk
      > baskets, paper and crafts woven and made from kudzu, and so forth. No kudzu
      > beer yet, that I know of.
      > >
      > > It did do a pretty good job with the erosion, though 8-P
      > >
      > > John
      > >
      > > John Riley
      > Regards,
      > --
      > Rodolpho Pajuaba
      > www.pajuaba.com.br/heterose
      > www.pajuaba.com.br/panoblog
      > www.pajuaba.com.br/traduzindophotoshop
      > Follow me on Twitter - @rpajuaba
      >
      >
      >


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