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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Testing Stereoscopic Panorama

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  • Roger D. Williams
    ... The stereo prism glasses I use require the images to be one over the other, which of course is ideal for panoramas with high aspect ratios. They give an
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 31, 2011
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      On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 18:09:27 +0900, onezebra1 <onezebra1@...> wrote:

      > Ok, how about this width? Problem will be different screens will be
      > different view sizes.
      > http://www.indiavrtours.com/vrphotos/3d.html


      The stereo prism glasses I use require the images to be one over the
      other, which of course is ideal for panoramas with high aspect
      ratios. They give an excellent stereo experience... But they are
      so uncommon that I fear very few would get to enjoy your stereo
      images.

      But rather than reduce the width of the images so that straight on
      viewing is possible, why not provide them for cross-eyed viewing
      as John suggested?

      This would allow you to make far better use of screen real estate.

      Roger W,

      >
      > I'm looking at getting some 3-D TV Stereo Prism Glasses that they sell
      > on amazom.com
      > They say these will work on any size screen.
      >
      > Roger Berry
      >
      >
      > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "John Houghton" <j.houghton@...>
      > wrote:
      >>
      >> --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "onezebra1" <onezebra1@> wrote:
      >> >
      >> > This may be too wide ....
      >>
      >> Roger, The images need to be transposed if there is to be any
      >> possibility of viewing the images in 3D at this size, for which you can
      >> use the cross-eyed method. Only by zooming the window to less than 50%
      >> (on my screen) can I see the 3D effect with the eyes straight ahead,
      >> but the image is then far too small.
      >>
      >> John
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >


      --
      Work: www.adex-japan.com
    • Roger D. Williams
      On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 19:01:58 +0900, Roger D. Williams ... Roger, after searching for the Amazon glasses I see that they use a different principle from my own,
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 31, 2011
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        On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 19:01:58 +0900, Roger D. Williams
        <roger@...> wrote:

        > On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 18:09:27 +0900, onezebra1 <onezebra1@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >> Ok, how about this width? Problem will be different screens will be
        >> different view sizes.
        >> http://www.indiavrtours.com/vrphotos/3d.html
        >

        Roger, after searching for the Amazon glasses I see that they use a
        different principle from my own, which are probably better called
        "periscope" goggles. Mine uses mirrors to direct the L & R eyes
        to images one above the other. As I said, this enables wide but
        shallow images (like most non-VR panoramas) to be viewed spread
        across the entire screen. But as I also said, this is pretty rare
        and won't get you many viewers. It is highly effective and quite
        free of eye strain for viewing my own images, which is what I use
        it for...

        Roger W.

        --
        Work: www.adex-japan.com
      • onezebra1
        I had heard about cross-eye viewing but just now did a search and found out more about it. Right now I m just playing with this style because I at work for the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 31, 2011
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          I had heard about cross-eye viewing but just now did a search and found out more about it.
          Right now I'm just playing with this style because I at work for the next few days and can't work on the photos.

          At Amazon I found 3 types of viewers:
          Pokescope® 3D Stereo Viewer.
          3-D TV Stereo Prism Glasses.
          Adjustable 3D Stereo Wide Viewer for Monitor and 3D Prints.

          Roger Berry


          > The stereo prism glasses I use require the images to be one over the
          > other, which of course is ideal for panoramas with high aspect
          > ratios. They give an excellent stereo experience... But they are
          > so uncommon that I fear very few would get to enjoy your stereo
          > images.
          >
          > But rather than reduce the width of the images so that straight on
          > viewing is possible, why not provide them for cross-eyed viewing
          > as John suggested?
          >
          > This would allow you to make far better use of screen real estate.
          >
          > Roger W,
          >
        • John Houghton
          ... That s still slightly too big a separation on my screen (3 inches) but I can manage to fuse the images if I move back a bit. It s a poor viewing
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 31, 2011
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            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "onezebra1" <onezebra1@...> wrote:
            >
            > Ok, how about this width? Problem will be different screens will be different view sizes.

            That's still slightly too big a separation on my screen (3 inches) but I can manage to fuse the images if I move back a bit. It's a poor viewing experience, though. Prism glasses would be essential.

            Anyone not able to manage the straight ahead method might like to try this autostereo image. To see the proper effect, move close to the screen and look through it to see a blurry image but let the repeating pattern snap into alignment. Then move away from the screen anf focus without losing the alignment. You should see a shark in front of the flat background.

            John
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