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Advice- VR tour in a Antiques shop

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  • David UmbertoZ
    Hi, I have a client who owns an antiques shop who would like to have a virtual tour of it. I have already done several ones but, although the quality was very
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 6, 2010
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      Hi, I have a client who owns an antiques shop who would like to have a virtual tour of it. I have already done several ones but, although the quality was very satisfying, I believe I've complicated my life too much when acquiring the photos.

      I'll be using a Nikon D3 with (unfortunately) a DX lens - fisheye Nikkor 10.5mm - So far I've always taken a shot a zenith - a row at +45º (with 50ºsteps), a row at -45º and one at nadir but, could I have done simply one row vertical plus zenith and nadir? Would that have been sufficient to cover the whole ground? I've not had too great misalignment problems but avoiding multirow shooting would reduce the risk even more, right?

      The client needs to zoom in keeping a good image quality but at the same time have a not too big a file to upload on their website. Any advise this matter?

      software used: APG and Pano2Vr

      Thank you in advance.
      David
    • Sacha Griffin
      Set your npp once, spend half an hour at it if you have to. OR all day if you’re unsure. If you have a correct setting you should have ZERO alignment issues.
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 6, 2010
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        Set your npp once, spend half an hour at it if you have to. OR all day if
        you’re unsure.

        If you have a correct setting you should have ZERO alignment issues.

        Read everything you can about how to do it, and how the overlap you use
        affects correct calibration.

        Then the only other thing you need to do is use decent controls points, try
        not to use generated control points until you became an expert at stitching.

        You only need to spend 20 seconds per image pair at most.

        Optimize and you’re done with a great panorama.



        What the heck is APG?





        Sacha Griffin

        Southern Digital Solutions LLC - Atlanta, Georgia

        <http://www.seeit360.net/> http://www.seeit360.net

        <http://twitter.com/SeeIt360> http://twitter.com/SeeIt360

        <http://www.facebook.com/panoramas/> http://www.facebook.com/panoramas/

        IM: <mailto:sachagriffin007@...> sachagriffin007@...

        Office: 404-551-4275

        GV: 404-665-9990









        From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of David UmbertoZ
        Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 4:29 PM
        To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Advice- VR tour in a Antiques shop





        Hi, I have a client who owns an antiques shop who would like to have a
        virtual tour of it. I have already done several ones but, although the
        quality was very satisfying, I believe I've complicated my life too much
        when acquiring the photos.

        I'll be using a Nikon D3 with (unfortunately) a DX lens - fisheye Nikkor
        10.5mm - So far I've always taken a shot a zenith - a row at +45º (with
        50ºsteps), a row at -45º and one at nadir but, could I have done simply one
        row vertical plus zenith and nadir? Would that have been sufficient to cover
        the whole ground? I've not had too great misalignment problems but avoiding
        multirow shooting would reduce the risk even more, right?

        The client needs to zoom in keeping a good image quality but at the same
        time have a not too big a file to upload on their website. Any advise this
        matter?

        software used: APG and Pano2Vr

        Thank you in advance.
        David





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Uri
        ... The 10.5mm lens can be easily shaved ; this will permit you to take full spherical panoramas with just 4 shots all around. For a D3 and a stock,
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 6, 2010
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          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "David UmbertoZ" <davidumbertozappa@...> wrote:

          > I'll be using a Nikon D3 with (unfortunately) a DX lens - fisheye Nikkor 10.5mm - So far I've always taken a shot a zenith - a row at +45º (with 50ºsteps), a row at -45º and one at nadir but, could I have done simply one row vertical plus zenith and nadir? Would that have been sufficient to cover the whole ground? I've not had too great misalignment problems but avoiding multirow shooting would reduce the risk even more, right?

          The 10.5mm lens can be easily "shaved"; this will permit you to take full spherical panoramas with just 4 shots all around. For a D3 and a stock, unshaved 10.5mm I would recommend 6 shots all around (60 degree steps) plus 1 straight up and 1 straight down.

          I shaved my lens the same way as shown at:
          http://www.singaporevr.com/blog/?p=659

          Another tutorial:
          http://tinyurl.com/26dfo78

          > The client needs to zoom in keeping a good image quality but at the same time have a not too big a file to upload on their website. Any advise this matter?

          Here is a panorama, taken inside an antique store, using a Nikon D70 with a stock Nikon 10.5mm fisheye. 6 shots all around, 1 up and 1 down. I don'e remember if I used PTGui or PTMac. Flash panorama created with Pano2VR, size 2.2 Mb:
          http://www.uricogan.com/trip/trip_pages/sami.html

          For a panorama taken with 4 shots all around, and a nadir shot, using a Nikon D700 and a shaved 10.5mm lens, size 3.4Mb:
          http://www.uricogan.com/qtvr/nursing_swf.html

          > software used: APG and Pano2Vr

          APG? what's that?
        • Thomas Krüger
          I m using a shaved 10.5 Nikon on a Canon 5D. Four images around, one image for the zenith and another image to cover the small patch for the tripod. Check the
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 6, 2010
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            I'm using a shaved 10.5 Nikon on a Canon 5D. Four images around, one image
            for the zenith and another image to cover the small patch for the tripod.

            Check the multiresolution feature of Pano2VR. You can provide the client
            with a small swf (for example 500x300px). Switching to fullscreen the swf
            will load the bigger tiles.
            --
            View this message in context: http://panotoolsng.586017.n4.nabble.com/Advice-VR-tour-in-a-Antiques-shop-tp3075365p3075901.html
            Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
          • Jean-Pierre
            Why don t you take 4 shots at 5° or 10°, plus one Nadir shot ? That s plenty enough with a shaved 10.5 on an FF camera ! Cheers, J-P.
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 7, 2010
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              Why don't you take 4 shots at 5° or 10°, plus one Nadir shot ?

              That's plenty enough with a shaved 10.5 on an FF camera !

              Cheers,
              J-P.
            • David UmbertoZ
              Sorry...tok for granted that APG would be clear... stands for AUTO PANO GIGA - downside of it (for me) is that manual control points are difficult to place..
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 7, 2010
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                Sorry...tok for granted that APG would be clear... stands for AUTO PANO GIGA - downside of it (for me) is that manual control points are difficult to place.. but that may be just me. Sometime the software does not accept them. don't know why (yet).

                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Sacha Griffin" <sachagriffin@...> wrote:
                >
                > Set your npp once, spend half an hour at it if you have to. OR all day if
                > you're unsure.
                >
                > If you have a correct setting you should have ZERO alignment issues.
                >
                > Read everything you can about how to do it, and how the overlap you use
                > affects correct calibration.
                >
                > Then the only other thing you need to do is use decent controls points, try
                > not to use generated control points until you became an expert at stitching.
                >
                > You only need to spend 20 seconds per image pair at most.
                >
                > Optimize and you're done with a great panorama.
                >
                >
                >
                > What the heck is APG?
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Sacha Griffin
                >
                > Southern Digital Solutions LLC - Atlanta, Georgia
                >
                > <http://www.seeit360.net/> http://www.seeit360.net
                >
                > <http://twitter.com/SeeIt360> http://twitter.com/SeeIt360
                >
                > <http://www.facebook.com/panoramas/> http://www.facebook.com/panoramas/
                >
                > IM: <mailto:sachagriffin007@...> sachagriffin007@...
                >
                > Office: 404-551-4275
                >
                > GV: 404-665-9990
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
                > Behalf Of David UmbertoZ
                > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 4:29 PM
                > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Advice- VR tour in a Antiques shop
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Hi, I have a client who owns an antiques shop who would like to have a
                > virtual tour of it. I have already done several ones but, although the
                > quality was very satisfying, I believe I've complicated my life too much
                > when acquiring the photos.
                >
                > I'll be using a Nikon D3 with (unfortunately) a DX lens - fisheye Nikkor
                > 10.5mm - So far I've always taken a shot a zenith - a row at +45º (with
                > 50ºsteps), a row at -45º and one at nadir but, could I have done simply one
                > row vertical plus zenith and nadir? Would that have been sufficient to cover
                > the whole ground? I've not had too great misalignment problems but avoiding
                > multirow shooting would reduce the risk even more, right?
                >
                > The client needs to zoom in keeping a good image quality but at the same
                > time have a not too big a file to upload on their website. Any advise this
                > matter?
                >
                > software used: APG and Pano2Vr
                >
                > Thank you in advance.
                > David
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • David UmbertoZ
                Thanks for precious information... APG - Auto Pano Giga. sorry
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 7, 2010
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                  Thanks for precious information... APG - Auto Pano Giga.
                  sorry

                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Uri" <uri@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "David UmbertoZ" <davidumbertozappa@> wrote:
                  >
                  > > I'll be using a Nikon D3 with (unfortunately) a DX lens - fisheye Nikkor 10.5mm - So far I've always taken a shot a zenith - a row at +45º (with 50ºsteps), a row at -45º and one at nadir but, could I have done simply one row vertical plus zenith and nadir? Would that have been sufficient to cover the whole ground? I've not had too great misalignment problems but avoiding multirow shooting would reduce the risk even more, right?
                  >
                  > The 10.5mm lens can be easily "shaved"; this will permit you to take full spherical panoramas with just 4 shots all around. For a D3 and a stock, unshaved 10.5mm I would recommend 6 shots all around (60 degree steps) plus 1 straight up and 1 straight down.
                  >
                  > I shaved my lens the same way as shown at:
                  > http://www.singaporevr.com/blog/?p=659
                  >
                  > Another tutorial:
                  > http://tinyurl.com/26dfo78
                  >
                  > > The client needs to zoom in keeping a good image quality but at the same time have a not too big a file to upload on their website. Any advise this matter?
                  >
                  > Here is a panorama, taken inside an antique store, using a Nikon D70 with a stock Nikon 10.5mm fisheye. 6 shots all around, 1 up and 1 down. I don'e remember if I used PTGui or PTMac. Flash panorama created with Pano2VR, size 2.2 Mb:
                  > http://www.uricogan.com/trip/trip_pages/sami.html
                  >
                  > For a panorama taken with 4 shots all around, and a nadir shot, using a Nikon D700 and a shaved 10.5mm lens, size 3.4Mb:
                  > http://www.uricogan.com/qtvr/nursing_swf.html
                  >
                  > > software used: APG and Pano2Vr
                  >
                  > APG? what's that?
                  >
                • David UmbertoZ
                  Very useful thank you!!!!!
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 7, 2010
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                    Very useful thank you!!!!!

                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Krüger <th.krueger@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > I'm using a shaved 10.5 Nikon on a Canon 5D. Four images around, one image
                    > for the zenith and another image to cover the small patch for the tripod.
                    >
                    > Check the multiresolution feature of Pano2VR. You can provide the client
                    > with a small swf (for example 500x300px). Switching to fullscreen the swf
                    > will load the bigger tiles.
                    > --
                    > View this message in context: http://panotoolsng.586017.n4.nabble.com/Advice-VR-tour-in-a-Antiques-shop-tp3075365p3075901.html
                    > Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
                    >
                  • prague
                    i ve used a shaved 10.5 and 5d for about 4 years.... you only need THREE shots around, period! shooting handheld, 4 around +1 up (and 1 down) is ideal. like
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 8, 2010
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                      i've used a shaved 10.5 and 5d for about 4 years....

                      you only need THREE shots around, period!

                      shooting handheld, 4 around +1 up (and 1 down) is ideal.
                      like these for example
                      http://www.360cities.net/image/farmers-market-in-old-havana-onions#23.59,14.45,86.2

                      it is my favorite camera/lens for shooting handheld panos. a bit easier than 5d/samyang.

                      cheers
                      jeffrey


                      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Krüger <th.krueger@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > I'm using a shaved 10.5 Nikon on a Canon 5D. Four images around, one image
                      > for the zenith and another image to cover the small patch for the tripod.
                      >
                      > Check the multiresolution feature of Pano2VR. You can provide the client
                      > with a small swf (for example 500x300px). Switching to fullscreen the swf
                      > will load the bigger tiles.
                      > --
                      > View this message in context: http://panotoolsng.586017.n4.nabble.com/Advice-VR-tour-in-a-Antiques-shop-tp3075365p3075901.html
                      > Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
                      >
                    • Uri
                      ... Yes. 3 shots all-around is tricky but possible - it s reliable if there are lots of details that will provide enough control points with little overlap. I
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 8, 2010
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                        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "prague" <360cities@...> wrote:>
                        >
                        > i've used a shaved 10.5 and 5d for about 4 years....>
                        > you only need THREE shots around, period!
                        > > shooting handheld, 4 around +1 up (and 1 down) is ideal.

                        Yes. 3 shots all-around is tricky but possible - it's reliable if there are lots of details that will provide enough control points with little overlap.

                        I discovered that if I take just 4 shots using the 10.5mm shaved lens with the camera tilted up about 1-2 degrees, there is no need for a zenith shot. A separate nadir shot is optional - unless it's critical, I just use a small round patch at the nadir with copyright and contact info.
                      • Eric O'Brien
                        Just using a normal, unmodified nikon 10.5mm fisheye, six shots around the horizon (in portrait orientation), plus a zenith and nadir shot works fine. And is
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 10, 2010
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                          Just using a normal, unmodified nikon 10.5mm fisheye, six shots around
                          the horizon (in portrait orientation), plus a zenith and nadir shot
                          works fine. And is the "standard" approach, I believe.

                          eo

                          On Dec 6, 2010, at 1:28 PM, David UmbertoZ wrote:

                          > Hi, I have a client who owns an antiques shop who would like to have
                          > a virtual tour of it. I have already done several ones but, although
                          > the quality was very satisfying, I believe I've complicated my life
                          > too much when acquiring the photos.
                          >
                          > I'll be using a Nikon D3 with (unfortunately) a DX lens - fisheye
                          > Nikkor 10.5mm - So far I've always taken a shot a zenith - a row at
                          > +45º (with 50ºsteps), a row at -45º and one at nadir but, could I
                          > have done simply one row vertical plus zenith and nadir? Would that
                          > have been sufficient to cover the whole ground? I've not had too
                          > great misalignment problems but avoiding multirow shooting would
                          > reduce the risk even more, right?
                          >
                          > The client needs to zoom in keeping a good image quality but at the
                          > same time have a not too big a file to upload on their website. Any
                          > advise this matter?
                          >
                          > software used: APG and Pano2Vr
                          >
                          > Thank you in advance.
                          > David
                          >
                          > ___
                          >



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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