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Testing equipment for shooting nighttime panos

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  • onezebra1
    I m practicing shooting nighttime panos using different lens and flash heads. So far my Canon 5D mk2 with the Nikon 10.5mm lens and canon 430EX II flash seems
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 3, 2010
      I'm practicing shooting nighttime panos using different lens and flash heads. So far my Canon 5D mk2 with the Nikon 10.5mm lens and canon 430EX II flash seems to be working best.
      I've tried the Tokina 10-17mm lens but the F/3.5 there's a big disadvantage, and using a Canon 580EX II the recycle time was slower that the 430EX II flash.
      Here's a test shot using the Nikon 10.5 @ F/2.8, Canon 5D mk2 shutter speed 60, ISO 400 and up about 14 feet high on a K-tek boom pole.
      http://www.indiavrtours.com/vrphotos/night_test3.html

      Roger Berry
    • Roger D. Williams
      ... Astonishingly good for a night-time panorama using a flashgun. What are the speckles in the sky? They don t look like out-of-focus stars, nor insects, nor
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 3, 2010
        On Mon, 04 Oct 2010 14:00:13 +0900, onezebra1 <onezebra1@...> wrote:

        >
        > I'm practicing shooting nighttime panos using different lens and flash
        > heads. So far my Canon 5D mk2 with the Nikon 10.5mm lens and canon 430EX
        > II flash seems to be working best.
        > I've tried the Tokina 10-17mm lens but the F/3.5 there's a big
        > disadvantage, and using a Canon 580EX II the recycle time was slower
        > that the 430EX II flash.
        > Here's a test shot using the Nikon 10.5 @ F/2.8, Canon 5D mk2 shutter
        > speed 60, ISO 400 and up about 14 feet high on a K-tek boom pole.
        > http://www.indiavrtours.com/vrphotos/night_test3.html
        >
        > Roger Berry

        Astonishingly good for a night-time panorama using a flashgun. What are
        the speckles in the sky? They don't look like out-of-focus stars, nor
        insects, nor even dust on the sensor!

        Have you tried playing with graphic controls for vignetting to compensate
        for light fall-off at the edges of the flashgun illumination? I got
        somewhere with that but it all proved too care intensive to bother with.

        Roger W.

        --
        Business: www.adex-japan.com
        Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
      • onezebra1
        For this photo I adjusted the vignetting compensate all of the way up in Photoshop. The speckles in the sky are from dust on or near the lens and the flash
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 3, 2010
          For this photo I adjusted the vignetting compensate all of the way up in Photoshop.
          The speckles in the sky are from dust on or near the lens and the flash slightly hitting it.

          Here is a shot from 5 feet high with the flash @ 1/4 and ISO 100. Looking at the tree you can see a lot of speckles, I think this was from dust the zebra kicked up.
          http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/night_test3.jpg

          Roger Berry

          >
          > Astonishingly good for a night-time panorama using a flashgun. What are
          > the speckles in the sky? They don't look like out-of-focus stars, nor
          > insects, nor even dust on the sensor!
          >
          > Have you tried playing with graphic controls for vignetting to compensate
          > for light fall-off at the edges of the flashgun illumination? I got
          > somewhere with that but it all proved too care intensive to bother with.
          >
          > Roger W.
          >
          > --
          > Business: www.adex-japan.com
          > Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
          >
        • Roger D. Williams
          ... I am happy to say that Zebras kicking up dust are not much of a problem here in Tokyo. Noise pollution from politicians? yes! Zebra dust? no! Roger
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 4, 2010
            On Mon, 04 Oct 2010 15:02:48 +0900, onezebra1 <onezebra1@...> wrote:

            > For this photo I adjusted the vignetting compensate all of the way up in
            > Photoshop.
            > The speckles in the sky are from dust on or near the lens and the flash
            > slightly hitting it.

            I am happy to say that Zebras kicking up dust are not much of a problem
            here in Tokyo. <grin> Noise pollution from politicians? yes! Zebra dust?
            no!

            Roger W.

            --
            Business: www.adex-japan.com
            Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
          • Thomas Kr├╝ger
            Quantum has external batteries for a faster recycling time. http://www.qtm.com/?page=2930&qmode=c -- View this message in context:
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 4, 2010
              Quantum has external batteries for a faster recycling time.
              http://www.qtm.com/?page=2930&qmode=c
              --
              View this message in context: http://panotoolsng.586017.n4.nabble.com/Testing-equipment-for-shooting-nighttime-panos-tp2953817p2953890.html
              Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
            • onezebra1
              I checked my photos from last night and figured out what those speckles where. There was some fog moving in and I remembered feeling some small water droplets
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 4, 2010
                I checked my photos from last night and figured out what those speckles where. There was some fog moving in and I remembered feeling some small water droplets hitting my face when the breeze blew. So the speckles you see are very small water droplets extremely close to the lens being illuminated by the flash.

                Roger Berry


                >
                > Astonishingly good for a night-time panorama using a flashgun. What are
                > the speckles in the sky? They don't look like out-of-focus stars, nor
                > insects, nor even dust on the sensor!
                >
                > Have you tried playing with graphic controls for vignetting to compensate
                > for light fall-off at the edges of the flashgun illumination? I got
                > somewhere with that but it all proved too care intensive to bother with.
                >
                > Roger W.
                >
                > --
                > Business: www.adex-japan.com
                > Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
                >
              • Roger D. Williams
                ... Aha! I thought it had to be something pretty unusual. Something to avoid if possible... Roger W. -- Business: www.adex-japan.com Pleasure:
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 5, 2010
                  On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 11:42:59 +0900, onezebra1 <onezebra1@...> wrote:

                  > I checked my photos from last night and figured out what those speckles
                  > where. There was some fog moving in and I remembered feeling some small
                  > water droplets hitting my face when the breeze blew. So the speckles you
                  > see are very small water droplets extremely close to the lens being
                  > illuminated by the flash.

                  Aha! I thought it had to be something pretty unusual. Something to avoid
                  if possible...

                  Roger W.

                  --
                  Business: www.adex-japan.com
                  Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
                • Rick Drew
                  You ll see the same thing in a dusty room or underwater. It s called backscatter. Rick Drew From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 5, 2010
                    You'll see the same thing in a dusty room or underwater. It's called
                    backscatter.



                    Rick Drew



                    From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf Of Roger D. Williams
                    Sent: 2010-10-05 3:02 AM
                    To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Testing equipment for shooting nighttime
                    panos





                    On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 11:42:59 +0900, onezebra1 <onezebra1@...
                    <mailto:onezebra1%40yahoo.com> > wrote:

                    > I checked my photos from last night and figured out what those speckles
                    > where. There was some fog moving in and I remembered feeling some small
                    > water droplets hitting my face when the breeze blew. So the speckles you
                    > see are very small water droplets extremely close to the lens being
                    > illuminated by the flash.

                    Aha! I thought it had to be something pretty unusual. Something to avoid
                    if possible...

                    Roger W.

                    --
                    Business: www.adex-japan.com
                    Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger





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