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Re: A stereo panorama kiosk

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  • panovrx
    ... There are lots of ways of showing stereo panoramas but I used object movies because the PC I could use was kind of old and I wanted to used interlaced
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 28, 2010
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      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Scott Witte <scottw@...> wrote:

      > Could you give us a comparison? What is the size of the object movie in
      > MB and what would it be as a simple cylindrical VR. Also, what are the
      > dimensions in pixels? I'm trying to understand how much more it takes in
      > resources to make stereo VR vs a standard one.
      >
      > You weren't happy with the smoothness of the playback and feel the CPU
      > was the bottleneck. What CPU are you using. i.e. could you have used
      > something much better and gotten better results or are you at the limit
      > of technology currently?
      >
      There are lots of ways of showing stereo panoramas but I used object movies because the PC I could use was kind of old and I wanted to used interlaced frames because that was what the monitor supported. Each object movie (90 frames 1920*1080) was about 20 meg. It was smooth enough but not like butter like we expect now with regular panos.

      Other ways include the glpanorama stereo player
      http://www.gali-3d.com/archive/articles/VFX3D_headtracking/Headtracking.php
      which is quite fast for interlaced panoramas even on old hardware but it has interface issues for a kiosk

      Then you could use anaglyph panoramas where there are no hardware restrictions.

      It is possible to do interlaced Flash panos directly as a user on the Pano2VR forum has shown but he has not released his scripting and it seemed a little slow.

      Other methods include using hardware OpenGl stereo hardware and shutter glasses and players like BSContact Stereo (which supports stereo textures in 3d worlds), or you can use Director and output side by side synced panoramas on a double width desktop and send the monitor output to two polarized projectors showing on a silver screen.
      Both are fine for stereo panoramas on modern hardware but have various issues for public kiosks.

      Peter M
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