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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Invisible light...

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  • Pat Swovelin
    On 9-26-2010 10:20 PM, Christian Bloch s hamster got loose on the ... If you re driving at the speed of light and turn on your headlights what would happen? I
    Message 1 of 34 , Sep 26, 2010
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      On 9-26-2010 10:20 PM, Christian Bloch's hamster got loose on the
      keyboard and typed ...:
      > Haha, good one.
      > Here are two more head scratchers:

      If you're driving at the speed of light and turn on your headlights what
      would happen? I mean other than getting one hell of a speeding
      ticket. =8^)

      > Since light travels at lightspeed, it falls under the laws of
      > relativity. So from the perspective of the light itself, there is no
      > time passing between hitting the object and hitting your eye.

      According to Jonathan Livingston Seagull that's the perfect speed:

      "You will begin to touch heaven, Jonathan, in the moment that you touch
      perfect speed. And that isn't flying a thousand miles an hour, or a
      million, or flying at the speed of light. Because any number is a limit,
      and perfection doesn't have limits. Perfect speed, my son, is being
      there." -- /From Jonathan Livingston Seagull/

      > When you say light, you're talking about a narrow band of the
      > electromagnetic spectrum, that just happens to be receptacle with our
      > eyes. What makes this band so special? Only that we see it. And how
      > would it look if we could see the band that WiFi routers transmit in?
      > Or microwaves?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On Sep 25, 2010, at 1:16 AM, Ken Warner wrote:
      >
      >> Light. It's all around us all the time. But we don't
      >> see the light. But we see the objects it is reflected
      >> from. Where is the light between objects and my eye?





      Pat Swovelin
      Cool Guy @ Large


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Pat Swovelin
      On 9-26-2010 10:20 PM, Christian Bloch s hamster got loose on the ... If you re driving at the speed of light and turn on your headlights what would happen? I
      Message 34 of 34 , Sep 26, 2010
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        On 9-26-2010 10:20 PM, Christian Bloch's hamster got loose on the
        keyboard and typed ...:
        > Haha, good one.
        > Here are two more head scratchers:

        If you're driving at the speed of light and turn on your headlights what
        would happen? I mean other than getting one hell of a speeding
        ticket. =8^)

        > Since light travels at lightspeed, it falls under the laws of
        > relativity. So from the perspective of the light itself, there is no
        > time passing between hitting the object and hitting your eye.

        According to Jonathan Livingston Seagull that's the perfect speed:

        "You will begin to touch heaven, Jonathan, in the moment that you touch
        perfect speed. And that isn't flying a thousand miles an hour, or a
        million, or flying at the speed of light. Because any number is a limit,
        and perfection doesn't have limits. Perfect speed, my son, is being
        there." -- /From Jonathan Livingston Seagull/

        > When you say light, you're talking about a narrow band of the
        > electromagnetic spectrum, that just happens to be receptacle with our
        > eyes. What makes this band so special? Only that we see it. And how
        > would it look if we could see the band that WiFi routers transmit in?
        > Or microwaves?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Sep 25, 2010, at 1:16 AM, Ken Warner wrote:
        >
        >> Light. It's all around us all the time. But we don't
        >> see the light. But we see the objects it is reflected
        >> from. Where is the light between objects and my eye?





        Pat Swovelin
        Cool Guy @ Large


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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