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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Historical details embedded in present day photos in perspective

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  • Matt Smith
    One way or the other, thanks for showing, I just spent 20 minutes looking at them. Matt Smith PhotoSpherix 317.396.5791 360 Product Photography Indianapolis,
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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      One way or the other, thanks for showing, I just spent 20 minutes
      looking at them.

      Matt Smith
      PhotoSpherix
      317.396.5791
      360 Product Photography
      Indianapolis, Indiana USA
      http://www.photospherix.com

      On Aug 3, 2010, at 8:11 AM, paul womack wrote:

      > panovrx wrote:
      >> This is nicely done I thought -- scenes from Russian(?) history
      >> overlaid in perspective on contemporary images. In a panorama they
      >> could fade in and out.
      >> http://sergey-larenkov.livejournal.com/
      >
      > I suspect the artist has chosen the selections of the image to
      > represent
      > the different eras with care.
      >
      > I don't think that allowing the viewer to do it would be better.
      >
      > And I don't see how it could be a panorama at all - I'm guessing
      > the OLD images are single images, with no scope for shooting more (!)
      >
      > BugBear
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > --
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • paul womack
      ... OK, after some googling, this is what I have so far. This has been all over the web-sphere in the last few days. There s some new software out
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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        Matt Smith wrote:
        >>> http://sergey-larenkov.livejournal.com/
        > One way or the other, thanks for showing, I just spent 20 minutes
        > looking at them.

        OK, after some googling, this is what I have so far.

        This has been all over the web-sphere in the last few days.

        There's some new software out

        http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/07/camera-software-lets-you-see-into-the-past/

        Which was then followed up by Sergey Larenkov's site.

        http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/07/gallery-of-rephotography-shows-wwii-in-todays-cities/

        But I Larenkov's work is much earlier than the recent buzz:

        http://englishrussia.com/index.php/2009/01/26/2235/

        Note the date.

        The ACM paper on the software is June 2010

        So - does anyone know what Larenkov's technique is?

        BugBear
      • paul womack
        ... http://www.flickr.com/photos/36383814@N00/3202721568/ Bruno - you holdin out on us? BugBear
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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          paul womack wrote:
          >
          > So - does anyone know what Larenkov's technique is?

          http://www.flickr.com/photos/36383814@N00/3202721568/

          Bruno - you holdin' out on us?

          BugBear
        • bryant_arnett
          Hi. Neat stuff! I tried my hand at this a few years ago for the WWP.... http://www.worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp306/html/BryantArnett-1902.html
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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            Hi. Neat stuff! I tried my hand at this a few years ago for the WWP....

            http://www.worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp306/html/BryantArnett-1902.html

            The hard part was finding the location! Then it was just a matter of lining up points on the buildings. I found that if my camera is in the exact location as the camera used for the original shot, the focal length and lens settings don't matter.

            ````````Bryant
          • Robert Slade
            ... That s because the perception of the scene is defined entirely by perspective. A 24mm lens has the same perspective as a 300mm lens for any given camera
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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              bryant_arnett wrote:

              > The hard part was finding the location! Then it was just a matter of
              > lining up points on the buildings. I found that if my camera is in the
              > exact location as the camera used for the original shot, the focal
              > length and lens settings don't matter.

              That's because the perception of the scene is defined entirely by
              perspective. A 24mm lens has the same perspective as a 300mm lens for
              any given camera position.

              I also tried this type of project in 1997 with a series of old B&W
              postcards from the early 1900s. As you said, the hard part was finding
              the exact same location!

              Regards,
              Rob

              --
              Robert Slade, Photographer
              Manor Photography 07890 564889
              http://www.manor-photography.com
            • guillaume_fulchiron
              ... Funny, I watched a 2009 video the other day about Patrick Chauvel, one of the greatest war photographer (still alive), who is preparing an exhibition
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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                "panovrx" <panovrx@...> wrote:
                >
                > This is nicely done I thought -- scenes from Russian(?) history overlaid in perspective on contemporary images. In a panorama they could fade in and out.
                > http://sergey-larenkov.livejournal.com/
                >
                > Peter M
                >

                Funny, I watched a 2009 video the other day about Patrick Chauvel, one of the greatest war photographer (still alive), who is preparing an exhibition combining his war photos with views of Paris :
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfQWrsQGBiI&feature=player_embedded

                You will all recognize the software they used...

                Cheers,

                G.
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