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OT Question about Epson Pigment Inks and GLossy Prints

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  • Roger D. Williams
    When I got one of Epson s first pigment-based printers some years ago I knew not to expect glossy prints. Sure enough, colours were soft, natural, but strictly
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 15, 2010
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      When I got one of Epson's first pigment-based printers some
      years ago I knew not to expect glossy prints. Sure enough,
      colours were soft, natural, but strictly matte or a strange
      "semi-matte" that was still far from glossy.

      I recently started using it to print some holiday photos, and was
      surprised to see Epson "glossy" paper recommended for use with
      the pigment inks it uses. I got a set of the six ink cartridges
      needed at the same time as I purchased 50 sheets of this paper.

      The prints really do have a nice gloss. And thanks to advice
      I got from list members here they have good colour, quite close
      to those of my LCD display.

      However, I notice that the glossy surface of the prints is dull
      (non-reflective) where black is used in dark shadow areas. If
      you hold the prints up to the light at the right angle you can
      see exactly where the darkest areas are by their dull surface.

      I am still using up a photo-black ink cartridge from years ago,
      and I wonder if the glossy surface is only obtained with the
      newest inks? I guess I'll find out when it comes time to replace
      the photo-black cartridge. At the rate I'm going that could be
      months away...

      Epson sell both a "photo-black" and a "matte-black" cartridge,
      so I can't think why my photo-black cartridge gives a localized
      matte finish. I *have* checked that the right ink is being
      used!

      Can anyone throw light on this? Sorry for the OT post although
      colour printing is not completely unconnected with panoramas!

      Roger W.

      --
      Business: www.adex-japan.com
      Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
    • Thomas Krüger
      Jump over to the Printer Forum at luminous-landscape.com and post your question with all details like printer type, paper type and used ink set:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 16, 2010
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        Jump over to the Printer Forum at luminous-landscape.com and post your
        question with all details like printer type, paper type and used ink set:
        http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?s=b096ddc40b4895ffdf201749869a79ef&showforum=6


        --
        View this message in context: http://panotoolsng.586017.n4.nabble.com/OT-Question-about-Epson-Pigment-Inks-and-GLossy-Prints-tp2290978p2291041.html
        Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
      • Roger D. Williams
        Excellent suggestion, Thomas. If anyone is interested in the answer, contact me privately and I ll share any replies. The only problem is that Epson products
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 16, 2010
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          Excellent suggestion, Thomas. If anyone is interested in the answer,
          contact me privately and I'll share any replies. The only problem is
          that Epson products are identified differently in the US from the
          ones I am using here in Japan. <sigh>

          On Fri, 16 Jul 2010 16:36:04 +0900, Thomas Krüger <th.krueger@...>
          wrote:

          > Jump over to the Printer Forum at luminous-landscape.com and post your
          > question with all details like printer type, paper type and used ink set:
          > http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?s=b096ddc40b4895ffdf201749869a79ef&showforum=6

          Oh, I found it can take 48 hours to get approval for posting privileges,
          and was warned that 80% of applications are rejected. Here's hoping...

          Roger W.

          --
          Business: www.adex-japan.com
          Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
        • Bjørn K Nilssen
          ... While you re waiting for the luminous answer: My old Epson R800 uses pigment inks too, and it uses 8 cartridges. One of them is called Gloss Optimizer. Its
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 16, 2010
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            On 16 Jul 2010 at 17:21, Roger D. Williams wrote:

            > Excellent suggestion, Thomas. If anyone is interested in the answer,
            > contact me privately and I'll share any replies. The only problem is
            > that Epson products are identified differently in the US from the
            > ones I am using here in Japan. <sigh>

            While you're waiting for the luminous answer:
            My old Epson R800 uses pigment inks too, and it uses 8 cartridges.
            One of them is called Gloss Optimizer.
            Its purpose is to hide the blotchiness you get when printing on glossy paper. The
            ink/pigments typically have a different glossiness from the paper, and when viewed at
            certain angles that difference is pretty visible, and most visible in dark areas because
            that's where you have the highest densities of ink. If you have an area that is filled
            completely with magenta, cyan etc it will show the same effect.
            It's like viewing a film negatives, emulsion side up, at a certain angle with a dark
            background you can make the photo look like a positive.


            > On Fri, 16 Jul 2010 16:36:04 +0900, Thomas Krüger <th.krueger@...>
            > wrote:
            >
            > > Jump over to the Printer Forum at luminous-landscape.com and post your
            > > question with all details like printer type, paper type and used ink set:
            > >
            > http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?s=b096ddc40b4895ffdf201749869a79ef&showfor
            > um=6
            >
            > Oh, I found it can take 48 hours to get approval for posting privileges,
            > and was warned that 80% of applications are rejected. Here's hoping...

            --
            Bjørn K Nilssen - http://bknilssen.no - panoramas and 3D
          • Roger D. Williams
            On Fri, 16 Jul 2010 19:19:41 +0900, Bjørn K Nilssen ... Yes, that s pretty much what I am seeing. My PM4000-PX must predate your R800. No
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 16, 2010
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              On Fri, 16 Jul 2010 19:19:41 +0900, Bjørn K Nilssen <bk@...>
              wrote:

              > On 16 Jul 2010 at 17:21, Roger D. Williams wrote:
              >
              >> Excellent suggestion, Thomas. If anyone is interested in the answer,
              >> contact me privately and I'll share any replies. The only problem is
              >> that Epson products are identified differently in the US from the
              >> ones I am using here in Japan. <sigh>
              >
              > While you're waiting for the luminous answer:
              > My old Epson R800 uses pigment inks too, and it uses 8 cartridges.
              > One of them is called Gloss Optimizer.
              > Its purpose is to hide the blotchiness you get when printing on glossy
              > paper. The
              > ink/pigments typically have a different glossiness from the paper, and
              > when viewed at
              > certain angles that difference is pretty visible, and most visible in
              > dark areas because
              > that's where you have the highest densities of ink. If you have an area
              > that is filled
              > completely with magenta, cyan etc it will show the same effect.
              > It's like viewing a film negatives, emulsion side up, at a certain angle
              > with a dark
              > background you can make the photo look like a positive.

              Yes, that's pretty much what I am seeing. My PM4000-PX must predate your
              R800. No gloss optimizer on mine...

              I played with the ink density, reducing it by 5% or so, and this greatly
              reduced the effect. Still visible though. I largely see it for black,
              not for other colours.

              Roger W.

              --
              Business: www.adex-japan.com
              Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
            • Bjørn K Nilssen
              ... It is much more visible on black areas. They are covered not only with black ink, but usually also with all the other inks at the same place, to make it as
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 16, 2010
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                On 16 Jul 2010 at 19:35, Roger D. Williams wrote:

                > > that's where you have the highest densities of ink. If you have an area
                > > that is filled
                > > completely with magenta, cyan etc it will show the same effect.
                > > It's like viewing a film negatives, emulsion side up, at a certain angle
                > > with a dark
                > > background you can make the photo look like a positive.
                >
                > Yes, that's pretty much what I am seeing. My PM4000-PX must predate your
                > R800. No gloss optimizer on mine...
                >
                > I played with the ink density, reducing it by 5% or so, and this greatly
                > reduced the effect. Still visible though. I largely see it for black,
                > not for other colours.

                It is much more visible on black areas. They are covered not only with black ink, but
                usually also with all the other inks at the same place, to make it as black and dense as
                possible.

                --
                Bjørn K Nilssen - http://bknilssen.no - panoramas and 3D
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