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Underwater Camera Housing

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  • onezebra1
    Awhile back I was looking for an underwater camera housing for my Canon 5D-II that would go on the end of a pole. The problem was triggering the shutter with
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 12, 2010
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      Awhile back I was looking for an underwater camera housing for my Canon 5D-II that would go on the end of a pole. The problem was triggering the shutter with the camera underwater.

      Tomorrow I'm going down to AquaTech in Huntington Beach to check out their Aqua Tech DC-5 v2 Sport Housing. This housing is already set up to use a pole and external remote. Also, if I get it for use with the Tokina 10-17mm lens I can do normal shots and video too, which will make it much more useful.

      Next month I will have chance to shoot some tigers and elephants swimming if all goes well.

      Roger Berry
    • Robert C. Fisher
      Roger any idea what the cost of the case is? ... Cheers Robert C. Fisher VR Photography / Cinematography bob@rcfisher.com http://www.rcfisher.com Facebook -
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 12, 2010
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        Roger any idea what the cost of the case is?

        On Jul 12, 2010, at 7:24 PM, onezebra1 wrote:

        > Awhile back I was looking for an underwater camera housing for my
        > Canon 5D-II that would go on the end of a pole. The problem was
        > triggering the shutter with the camera underwater.
        >
        > Tomorrow I'm going down to AquaTech in Huntington Beach to check out
        > their Aqua Tech DC-5 v2 Sport Housing. This housing is already set
        > up to use a pole and external remote. Also, if I get it for use with
        > the Tokina 10-17mm lens I can do normal shots and video too, which
        > will make it much more useful.
        >
        > Next month I will have chance to shoot some tigers and elephants
        > swimming if all goes well.
        >
        > Roger Berry
        >
        >
        >

        Cheers
        Robert C. Fisher
        VR Photography / Cinematography
        bob@...
        http://www.rcfisher.com
        Facebook - Robert C. Fisher






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • onezebra1
        Hi Robert, I think they said something about an arm and leg, of course the large dome port and cable remote are extra, maybe just one more leg or something
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 12, 2010
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          Hi Robert,

          I think they said something about an arm and leg, of course the large dome port and cable remote are extra, maybe just one more leg or something like that.
          The DC-5 V2 Housing retails for $1,895.00 USD
          With luck I may get a price brake going to the supplier.

          I will be taking 4 lens with me for testing.
          Tokina 10-17mm
          Canon 24mm
          Carl Zeiss 28mm
          Nikon 10.5mm

          I'm hopeful the first 3 will all work with this housing and large dome port.

          Roger Berry


          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Robert C. Fisher" <bob@...> wrote:
          >
          > Roger any idea what the cost of the case is?
          >
          > On Jul 12, 2010, at 7:24 PM, onezebra1 wrote:
          >
          > > Awhile back I was looking for an underwater camera housing for my
          > > Canon 5D-II that would go on the end of a pole. The problem was
          > > triggering the shutter with the camera underwater.
          > >
          > > Tomorrow I'm going down to AquaTech in Huntington Beach to check out
          > > their Aqua Tech DC-5 v2 Sport Housing. This housing is already set
          > > up to use a pole and external remote. Also, if I get it for use with
          > > the Tokina 10-17mm lens I can do normal shots and video too, which
          > > will make it much more useful.
          > >
          > > Next month I will have chance to shoot some tigers and elephants
          > > swimming if all goes well.
          > >
          > > Roger Berry
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > Cheers
          > Robert C. Fisher
          > VR Photography / Cinematography
          > bob@...
          > http://www.rcfisher.com
          > Facebook - Robert C. Fisher
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Robert C. Fisher
          What s an arm or leg between friends. ... Cheers Robert C. Fisher VR Photography / Cinematography bob@rcfisher.com http://www.rcfisher.com Facebook - Robert C.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 12, 2010
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            What's an arm or leg between friends.

            On Jul 12, 2010, at 8:26 PM, onezebra1 wrote:

            >
            >
            > Hi Robert,
            >
            > I think they said something about an arm and leg, of course the
            > large dome port and cable remote are extra, maybe just one more leg
            > or something like that.
            > The DC-5 V2 Housing retails for $1,895.00 USD
            > With luck I may get a price brake going to the supplier.
            >
            > I will be taking 4 lens with me for testing.
            > Tokina 10-17mm
            > Canon 24mm
            > Carl Zeiss 28mm
            > Nikon 10.5mm
            >
            > I'm hopeful the first 3 will all work with this housing and large
            > dome port.
            >
            > Roger Berry
            > ._,___
            >

            Cheers
            Robert C. Fisher
            VR Photography / Cinematography
            bob@...
            http://www.rcfisher.com
            Facebook - Robert C. Fisher






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • onezebra1
            I ve been working on a bracket for the Aqua Tech underwater camera housing. You know how I like shooting panos using a pole, so this bracket s set up to be
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 27, 2010
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              I've been working on a bracket for the Aqua Tech underwater camera housing. You know how I like shooting panos using a pole, so this bracket's set up to be used with a K-Tek pole that telescopes around from 3 feet to 8 feet, and it also mounts on a tripod in portrait mode landscape mode.

              Here a photo of it yesterday:
              http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/housing.jpg

              And here's a photo of it today just about done, and the shutter cable is also hooked up here:
              http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/housing2.jpg

              This setup is for the Canon 5D II and Nikon 10.5mm lens, and it's adjustable where the Tokina 10-17mm lens will also work.

              Roger Berry
            • onezebra1
              With this underwater camera housing I m looking at shooting some split-level (over underwater) 360 degree spherical panoramas, Has anyone done this type
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 28, 2010
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                With this underwater camera housing I'm looking at shooting some split-level (over underwater) 360 degree spherical panoramas, Has anyone done this type before?

                I only have today to finish testing and learning how best to use this new setup, then next week I will be shooting 5 or more tigers swimming a large pool. I planning to shoot about a foot above the water, split-level and underwater panos.

                Here's some views of the housing on a tripod:
                http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/housing3.jpg
                http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/housing4.jpg

                Roger Berry
              • L.D.I. Felipe B. González
                Hi Roger! 2010/7/28 onezebra1 ... Cool Gear! Please share your results. -- L.D.I. Felipe B. González C. felipe@fpk.com.mx 1998-5246
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 28, 2010
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                  Hi Roger!



                  2010/7/28 onezebra1 <onezebra1@...>

                  > Here's some views of the housing on a tripod:
                  >
                  > http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/housing4.jpg
                  >

                  Cool Gear!

                  Please share your results.

                  --
                  L.D.I. Felipe B. González C.
                  felipe@...
                  1998-5246
                  www.fpk.com.mx
                  http://recorridosvirtualesmexico.blogspot.com/

                  Socio Director Maquetas Virtuales www.maquetasvirtuales.com
                  Socio Director Recorridos Virtuales www.recorridosvirtuales.com


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Scott Highton
                  Hi Roger, Split level over/underwater photography is a bit of a challenge to do well, particularly for panoramas. For an example, see one I did during the
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 28, 2010
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                    Hi Roger,

                    Split level over/underwater photography is a bit of a challenge to do
                    well, particularly for panoramas. For an example, see one I did
                    during the early days of QTVR. It's on the QTVR portfolio page of my
                    (now antiquated) highton.com web site at:
                    http://www.highton.com/pages/showqtvrport.html
                    (Scroll about halfway down the thumbnails on the left)


                    For traditional (single shot) over/under images, you need to clearly
                    understand and use hyperfocal distances. These are the focus
                    distances you set your lens to in order to get everything from
                    infinity to a closest distance in sharp focus. Hyperfocal distances
                    vary not only with your aperture setting, but also with the focal
                    length of your lens. There are lots of calculators available on the
                    web for this. There are also markings on many older (manual) lenses
                    that can help you determine these. The subject is also discussed in
                    detail in Chapter 4 of my Virtual Reality Photography book.


                    When shooting underwater with your camera in a dome port housing, as
                    seen in your photos, you have to remember that the dome/water
                    interface itself acts like another lens that your camera must shoot
                    through. The dome/water forms a virtual image (making it much closer)
                    which your camera's lens must be focused on in order to get sharp
                    images underwater. For subjects at or near infinity distance
                    underwater, your camera's lens will need to be focused at a distance
                    of approximately twice the diameter of the dome. If you are shooting
                    through an eight inch dome, your lens will need to be focused at about
                    16". If your subjects are closer than near infinity (which most
                    underwater subjects tend to be), your lens will need to be able to
                    focus even closer. I highly recommend doing a lot of preliminary
                    testing in a pool, or even a bath tub, to make sure your camera/lens/
                    housing combination will work the way you need it to.

                    You'll need to choose an aperture setting that provides a hyperfocal
                    sharpness range that includes both infinity (for the distant subjects
                    above the surface) and the closest focus for the virtual image of your
                    underwater subject(s). The wider the focal length of your lens and
                    the smaller the aperture you can use, the better. Then, make sure
                    that you focus your lens at the hyperfocal distance specified for such
                    combination (of focal length and aperture), rather than at infinity or
                    at the closest focus distance. Avoid using autofocus. Set and hold
                    the hyperfocal distance on your lens manually.


                    Shooting a panoramic sequence using this technique is even more
                    complicated. You need to apply all the above AND make sure that your
                    housing is positioned so that for each shot in the sequence, the water
                    line goes through the exact center of the dome (and is level).
                    Otherwise, stitching can be a nightmare � much like having a moving
                    horizon between shots in a topside panorama sequence. If the water
                    that your camera is in is rough or is being splashed (such as when
                    swimming animals disturb the surface), you may find this next to
                    impossible. Obviously, you'll want the camera mounted on a tripod so
                    you can precisely position (and hold) it at the proper level in the
                    water. I find it very helpful to wrap a weight belt with 15-20 pounds
                    around the tripod in order to stabilize it on the bottom of the
                    underwater surface you're shooting from.

                    Double check all the lubrication and seals on your housing before
                    immersing it in the water with a camera in it (including making sure
                    the dome port is tightened � I flooded a housing once by forgetting
                    this in a rush to get in the water). And remember that your first
                    priority in the water should always be safety, rather than getting
                    pictures.

                    Again, the best thing to do is to test your entire setup and work flow
                    in the controlled confines of a swimming pool before you need to shoot
                    an assignment like this with it.

                    Best of luck with your efforts.






                    Scott Highton
                    Author, Virtual Reality Photography
                    Web: http://www.vrphotography.com



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • onezebra1
                    Hi Scott, I ve been doing a lot of reading up on the subject and have a few ideas of my own. For one I hope to get my tripod setup in the pool and while the
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 28, 2010
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                      Hi Scott,
                      I've been doing a lot of reading up on the subject and have a few ideas of my own. For one I hope to get my tripod setup in the pool and while the water's smooth, I will shoot some shots, then shot more with the animals swimming around. Use the smooth water shots to make the pano and then Photoshop the animals in from the rough water shots.
                      Also have some other tricks I think may help in the rough water.

                      I put my underwater setup in a pool today checking for leaks, focus and buoyancy. I need to add a few pounds to it, and for an angle shots like this it would work much better with my longer pole. Would also be helpful throwing some gravel or something on the bottom for control points.
                      Anyway, here's my rough test shot. The line of decorative tile is at the top of the water, above is the reflection.
                      http://www.indiavrtours.com/vrphotos/pool3.html


                      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Scott Highton <scott@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Roger,
                      >
                      > Split level over/underwater photography is a bit of a challenge to do
                      > well, particularly for panoramas. For an example, see one I did
                      > during the early days of QTVR. It's on the QTVR portfolio page of my
                      > (now antiquated) highton.com web site at:
                      > http://www.highton.com/pages/showqtvrport.html
                      > (Scroll about halfway down the thumbnails on the left)
                      >
                      >
                      > For traditional (single shot) over/under images, you need to clearly
                      > understand and use hyperfocal distances. These are the focus
                      > distances you set your lens to in order to get everything from
                      > infinity to a closest distance in sharp focus. Hyperfocal distances
                      > vary not only with your aperture setting, but also with the focal
                      > length of your lens. There are lots of calculators available on the
                      > web for this. There are also markings on many older (manual) lenses
                      > that can help you determine these. The subject is also discussed in
                      > detail in Chapter 4 of my Virtual Reality Photography book.
                      >
                      >
                      > When shooting underwater with your camera in a dome port housing, as
                      > seen in your photos, you have to remember that the dome/water
                      > interface itself acts like another lens that your camera must shoot
                      > through. The dome/water forms a virtual image (making it much closer)
                      > which your camera's lens must be focused on in order to get sharp
                      > images underwater. For subjects at or near infinity distance
                      > underwater, your camera's lens will need to be focused at a distance
                      > of approximately twice the diameter of the dome. If you are shooting
                      > through an eight inch dome, your lens will need to be focused at about
                      > 16". If your subjects are closer than near infinity (which most
                      > underwater subjects tend to be), your lens will need to be able to
                      > focus even closer. I highly recommend doing a lot of preliminary
                      > testing in a pool, or even a bath tub, to make sure your camera/lens/
                      > housing combination will work the way you need it to.
                      >
                      > You'll need to choose an aperture setting that provides a hyperfocal
                      > sharpness range that includes both infinity (for the distant subjects
                      > above the surface) and the closest focus for the virtual image of your
                      > underwater subject(s). The wider the focal length of your lens and
                      > the smaller the aperture you can use, the better. Then, make sure
                      > that you focus your lens at the hyperfocal distance specified for such
                      > combination (of focal length and aperture), rather than at infinity or
                      > at the closest focus distance. Avoid using autofocus. Set and hold
                      > the hyperfocal distance on your lens manually.
                      >
                      >
                      > Shooting a panoramic sequence using this technique is even more
                      > complicated. You need to apply all the above AND make sure that your
                      > housing is positioned so that for each shot in the sequence, the water
                      > line goes through the exact center of the dome (and is level).
                      > Otherwise, stitching can be a nightmare – much like having a moving
                      > horizon between shots in a topside panorama sequence. If the water
                      > that your camera is in is rough or is being splashed (such as when
                      > swimming animals disturb the surface), you may find this next to
                      > impossible. Obviously, you'll want the camera mounted on a tripod so
                      > you can precisely position (and hold) it at the proper level in the
                      > water. I find it very helpful to wrap a weight belt with 15-20 pounds
                      > around the tripod in order to stabilize it on the bottom of the
                      > underwater surface you're shooting from.
                      >
                      > Double check all the lubrication and seals on your housing before
                      > immersing it in the water with a camera in it (including making sure
                      > the dome port is tightened – I flooded a housing once by forgetting
                      > this in a rush to get in the water). And remember that your first
                      > priority in the water should always be safety, rather than getting
                      > pictures.
                      >
                      > Again, the best thing to do is to test your entire setup and work flow
                      > in the controlled confines of a swimming pool before you need to shoot
                      > an assignment like this with it.
                      >
                      > Best of luck with your efforts.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Scott Highton
                      > Author, Virtual Reality Photography
                      > Web: http://www.vrphotography.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • onezebra1
                      When shooting in the water with the camera in a housing you won t be able to change the memory card easily, so I got some 16GB cards. As for keeping things
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 28, 2010
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                        When shooting in the water with the camera in a housing you won't be able to change the memory card easily, so I got some 16GB cards.

                        As for keeping things level I added this bubble level today, it's mounted to the bracket nicely out of the way under the housing and swings out for easy use and good visibility. I have a better bubble level on order and will probably change it out later.
                        http://www.indiavrtours.com/pic/housing5.jpg

                        Roger Berry
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