Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [PanoToolsNG] Mildly OT: installing Flash on OS X without password

Expand Messages
  • mick crane
    ... It is the way things are these days. you have to take that leap of trust. probably there are ways to protect sensitive stuff but generally everything is
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 29, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      On Tue, June 29, 2010 5:43 am, Kathy Wheeler wrote:
      > My Firefox (beta) just updated itself to 3.6, and told me I should
      > update my Flash plugin to prevent "security and stability" issues. Security
      > issues yet again. How wonderful ... not. I already run Flashblock and
      > Flashkiller and I only allow Flash to run to see stuff
      > I really want to (like the panos posted here). But the damn Flash
      > installer wants my password, and for "security and stability" reasons and
      > the poor track record Flash has in that area I'm not prepared to give it.
      >
      > So ... does any Mac user here know how to install the current Flash
      > plugin by-passing the password requirement?? I found a windows related
      > page, but it doesn't translate well to OS X. I can't see one good reason
      > for Flash to need an administrator/system password. But at the moment as
      > I've disabled the old insecure/unstable plugin I'm
      > flying blind as far as most pano content is concerned :-(
      >
      > Suggestions appreciated, off-list if you prefer.

      It is the way things are these days. you have to take that leap of trust.
      probably there are ways to protect sensitive stuff but generally
      everything is done over the net and it wants root access. So you can be
      safe and have stuff that doesn't work very well or take the risk.
    • Roger Howard
      ... Just a note - admin isn t root (thank god!), and all Flash Player (or any app) needs is admin... and unlike root, admin access does *not* imply full access
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 29, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        On Tue, Jun 29, 2010 at 12:07 PM, mick crane <mick.crane@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        > On Tue, June 29, 2010 5:43 am, Kathy Wheeler wrote:
        > > My Firefox (beta) just updated itself to 3.6, and told me I should
        > > update my Flash plugin to prevent "security and stability" issues.
        > Security
        > > issues yet again. How wonderful ... not. I already run Flashblock and
        > > Flashkiller and I only allow Flash to run to see stuff
        > > I really want to (like the panos posted here). But the damn Flash
        > > installer wants my password, and for "security and stability" reasons and
        > > the poor track record Flash has in that area I'm not prepared to give it.
        > >
        > > So ... does any Mac user here know how to install the current Flash
        > > plugin by-passing the password requirement?? I found a windows related
        > > page, but it doesn't translate well to OS X. I can't see one good reason
        > > for Flash to need an administrator/system password. But at the moment as
        > > I've disabled the old insecure/unstable plugin I'm
        > > flying blind as far as most pano content is concerned :-(
        > >
        > > Suggestions appreciated, off-list if you prefer.
        >
        > It is the way things are these days. you have to take that leap of trust.
        > probably there are ways to protect sensitive stuff but generally
        > everything is done over the net and it wants root access. So you can be
        > safe and have stuff that doesn't work very well or take the risk.
        >

        Just a note - admin isn't root (thank god!), and all Flash Player (or any
        app) needs is admin... and unlike root, admin access does *not* imply full
        access to any files on your filesystem. Likewise, most all of us should be
        running our day to day login as a regular user - not admin... though I'd be
        willing to be not 10% of us do. This simple step is something that'll go a
        long way to limiting the damage of trojan horses and other malware, and is
        not nearly as limiting as it might sound.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Robert C. Fisher
        Ok Roger I have one user Me how do I set up an admin acct, or do I set up another user acct without admin privileges? If I do the later how do I get my user
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 29, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Ok Roger I have one user "Me" how do I set up an admin acct, or do I
          set up another user acct without admin privileges? If I do the later
          how do I get my user info into the new user acct?

          >
          > Just a note - admin isn't root (thank god!), and all Flash Player
          > (or any
          > app) needs is admin... and unlike root, admin access does *not*
          > imply full
          > access to any files on your filesystem. Likewise, most all of us
          > should be
          > running our day to day login as a regular user - not admin... though
          > I'd be
          > willing to be not 10% of us do. This simple step is something
          > that'll go a
          > long way to limiting the damage of trojan horses and other malware,
          > and is
          > not nearly as limiting as it might sound.
          >
          >

          Cheers
          Robert C. Fisher
          VR Photography / Cinematography
          bob@...
          http://www.rcfisher.com
          Facebook - Robert C. Fisher






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Trausti Hraunfjord
          Absolutely correct. I have been preaching this to Windows users for years... saves people from buying antivirus software and saves them from crashes and saves
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 29, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Absolutely correct. I have been preaching this to Windows users for
            years... saves people from buying antivirus software and saves them from
            crashes and saves them from frustration ... and would also save me from
            having to fix their machines all the time... but unfortunately such an
            advice is not heeded by normal users.

            Me personally... never use a normal user account... but *that* is a
            different story :)

            Trausti

            On Tue, Jun 29, 2010 at 2:34 PM, Roger Howard <rogerhoward@...> wrote:


            most all of us should be
            running our day to day login as a regular user - not admin... though I'd be
            willing to be not 10% of us do. This simple step is something that'll go a
            long way to limiting the damage of trojan horses and other malware, and is
            not nearly as limiting as it might sound.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.