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Re: [PanoToolsNG] OT Help with Hot Pixels

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  • John Riley
    I don t know if this would work the same for a Canon, but with my Fuji S2 the hot pixels get mapped out in the RAW conversion. Hot pixels are there if I shoot
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 26, 2006
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      I don't know if this would work the same for a Canon, but with my
      Fuji S2 the hot pixels get mapped out in the RAW conversion. Hot
      pixels are there if I shoot a long exposure in jpeg and are also
      there before the conversion when I shoot in RAW, but gone after
      conversion. Do a long exposure with the lens cap on in jpeg and RAW
      and compare the two after converting the RAW.

      Almost all sensors have some hot and/or dead pixels. The cost of the
      sensor would be much higher if the QA was such that _no_ dead pixels
      were allowed. On some cameras, you can remap the dead pixels so that
      they are eliminated in the camera. When I was still using a Nikon
      995, I used a program that made the camera do just that. Before,
      lots of hot pixels; after, none (at least not showing.) I don't know
      if you can do that with a DSLR.

      If you are in a hot region of Mexico, that would exacerbate the
      problem, as sensor noise is temperature sensitive.

      John

      John Riley
      johnriley@...
      jriley@...




      On Nov 26, 2006, at 7:13 PM, Felipe González wrote:

      > Hi everyone
      >
      > I recently updated my Pano equipment and bought my first DSLR (a Canon
      > Rebel XT with a Peleng 8mm).
      >
      > Last week I was shooting a night pano on a restaurant and I noticed a
      > few white and a nasty magenta pixel. My exposure was of 2 seconds.
      > I guess the CMOS has "hot pixels" since all my pictures had exactly
      > the same pixels in the same position. Afterwards, back in my studio, I
      > made some test shots and this pixels appear starting at half second
      > exposures and worsen as the exposure time increases.
      >
      > I read that "hot pixels" are inevitable, but I'd rather ask (I'm not
      > even sure that this white pixels are hot pixels). Is there a method
      > (other than cloning the adjacent information in PS) to avoid having
      > this problem? Is it normal to have hot pixels or do I have to take my
      > camera to service (it's still in warranty)?
      >
      > Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
      >
      > Thanks from the subtropical regions of Mexico
      >
      > Felipe B.
      >
      >
      >



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