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Lone Pine Lake and Whitney Portal

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  • onezebra1
    Here s something a little different where I was perched on a large granite rock with awesome views down a heavily glaciated canyon to Whitney Portal while on
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 2, 2010
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      Here's something a little different where I was perched on a large granite rock with awesome views down a heavily glaciated canyon to Whitney Portal while on the opposite side is the beautiful Lone Pine Lake. Use the next button to move over to the lake. http://www.indiavrtours.com/vrphotos/lone_pine4.html
    • Paul Fretheim
      There are several views of Lone Pine Lake on my new product, Take Home Mt. Whitney in Virtual Reality. There is a tremendous amount of snow this year and the
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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        There are several views of Lone Pine Lake on my new product, "Take Home
        Mt. Whitney in Virtual Reality."

        There is a tremendous amount of snow this year and the snowpack is deep
        and ubiquitous for this time of year. I live in Independence, which is
        a popular resupply point for trekkers on the Pacific Crest Trail. I
        have yet to see my first trekker this spring.

        There is a very high and difficult pass between the Mt. Whitney area and
        Kearsarge Pass, which is the pass above Independence. The dangerous
        pass is Forester Pass which is just about exactly 4,000 meters high nad
        lies on the Kings/Kern divide. It's the highest pass on the trail
        between Mexico and Canada.

        I plan to cross it later this summer. I have been to the foot of the
        pass on both sides, but never over it. There are parts of the pass that
        require ice axes and glacier travel skills when the switchbacks are
        still covered with the ice clad drifts of the winter snowpack, as they
        must be now, June 3rd.

        I talked to a guy last spring who had saved a young woman's life after
        she managed to self arrest at the edge of a big sheer drop but could not
        climb back up. She had lost her footing while crossing one of the snow
        covered sections of the trail. He lowered a rope down and with a few
        people pulling they managed to pull her back up to a safer location. If
        she had not been carrying an ice ax which she was able to use for self
        arrest she would have catapulted over the edge to her death.

        http://inyopro.com/images/sheperds_alpine_meadow.html

        http://inyopro.com/images/tyndall_plateau_boulders.html

        http://inyopro.com/images/overlooking_forester_pass.html
      • Ron Rack
        Nice panos from the Mt Whitney area by Paul and Roger and the other week from Jürgen so I thought I would throw some into the mix. Just recently spent 1 day
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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          Nice panos from the Mt Whitney area by Paul and Roger and the other
          week from J�rgen so I thought I would throw some into the mix. Just
          recently spent 1 day in the area so I could hit only the major tourist
          areas. Actually, I was on the other side (west) of the Sierras in
          Sequoia National Park only a few miles as the crow flies from Mt.
          Whitney. The big trees are on the west side of Sequoia NP and Mt
          Whitney is also in Sequoia NP on the eastern edge. I shot about a
          dozen panos but only have a few posted as of yet. Of course I have
          "General Sherman" the largest tree in the world and a couple other
          sequoias. Also in the pano from the top of Moro Rock, I was able to
          get a few interesting features such as a passing thunderstorm, a
          passing Swift (bird), and a kinda' rare phenomena called a
          "circumhorizontal arc" all in the same pano!

          Moro Rock
          <http://rackphoto.com/pp/2010/05/22/moro-rock-sequoia-national-park/>

          Sequoia Trees
          <http://rackphoto.com/pp/special-projects/sequoia-national-park/>


          ron rack
          http://360around.com



          On Jun 3, 2010, at 11:46 AM, Paul Fretheim wrote:

          > There are several views of Lone Pine Lake on my new product, "Take
          > Home
          > Mt. Whitney in Virtual Reality."
          >
          > There is a tremendous amount of snow this year and the snowpack is
          > deep
          > and ubiquitous for this time of year. I live in Independence, which is
          > a popular resupply point for trekkers on the Pacific Crest Trail. I
          > have yet to see my first trekker this spring.
          >
          > There is a very high and difficult pass between the Mt. Whitney area
          > and
          > Kearsarge Pass, which is the pass above Independence. The dangerous
          > pass is Forester Pass which is just about exactly 4,000 meters high
          > nad
          > lies on the Kings/Kern divide. It's the highest pass on the trail
          > between Mexico and Canada.
          >
          > I plan to cross it later this summer. I have been to the foot of the
          > pass on both sides, but never over it. There are parts of the pass
          > that
          > require ice axes and glacier travel skills when the switchbacks are
          > still covered with the ice clad drifts of the winter snowpack, as they
          > must be now, June 3rd.
          >
          > I talked to a guy last spring who had saved a young woman's life after
          > she managed to self arrest at the edge of a big sheer drop but could
          > not
          > climb back up. She had lost her footing while crossing one of the snow
          > covered sections of the trail. He lowered a rope down and with a few
          > people pulling they managed to pull her back up to a safer location.
          > If
          > she had not been carrying an ice ax which she was able to use for self
          > arrest she would have catapulted over the edge to her death.
          >
          > http://inyopro.com/images/sheperds_alpine_meadow.html
          >
          > http://inyopro.com/images/tyndall_plateau_boulders.html
          >
          > http://inyopro.com/images/overlooking_forester_pass.html
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Pat Swovelin
          On 6-3-2010 1:17 PM, Ron Rack s hamster got loose on the keyboard and ... For those of you who have never been standing in front of the General Sherman tree
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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            On 6-3-2010 1:17 PM, Ron Rack's hamster got loose on the keyboard and
            typed ...:
            > Nice panos from the Mt Whitney area by Paul and Roger and the other
            > week from Jürgen so I thought I would throw some into the mix. Just
            > recently spent 1 day in the area so I could hit only the major tourist
            > areas. Actually, I was on the other side (west) of the Sierras in
            > Sequoia National Park only a few miles as the crow flies from Mt.
            > Whitney. The big trees are on the west side of Sequoia NP and Mt
            > Whitney is also in Sequoia NP on the eastern edge. I shot about a
            > dozen panos but only have a few posted as of yet. Of course I have
            > "General Sherman" the largest tree in the world and a couple other
            > sequoias. Also in the pano from the top of Moro Rock, I was able to
            > get a few interesting features such as a passing thunderstorm, a
            > passing Swift (bird), and a kinda' rare phenomena called a
            > "circumhorizontal arc" all in the same pano!
            >
            > Moro Rock
            > <http://rackphoto.com/pp/2010/05/22/moro-rock-sequoia-national-park/>
            >
            > Sequoia Trees
            > <http://rackphoto.com/pp/special-projects/sequoia-national-park/>

            For those of you who have never been standing in front of the General
            Sherman tree it's impossible to grasp the magnificence of this tree, no
            matter how well it's shot (thank you, Ron), its sheer size is
            staggering. This will put it into perspective for you. Before it broke
            off in January of 2006 the largest branch of the tree was 6.8 *FEET* in
            diameter and was 130 FEET above the ground. That's a full-sized tree as
            far as I'm concerned and it was merely a branch of the General Sherman tree.

            This tree, as well as the National Park its in, should be on your
            things-I-must-see/do-before-I-die list. Up near the top.

            > ron rack
            > http://360around.com
            >
            >
            >
            > On Jun 3, 2010, at 11:46 AM, Paul Fretheim wrote:
            >
            >> There are several views of Lone Pine Lake on my new product, "Take
            >> Home
            >> Mt. Whitney in Virtual Reality."
            >>
            >> There is a tremendous amount of snow this year and the snowpack is
            >> deep
            >> and ubiquitous for this time of year. I live in Independence, which is
            >> a popular resupply point for trekkers on the Pacific Crest Trail. I
            >> have yet to see my first trekker this spring.
            >>
            >> There is a very high and difficult pass between the Mt. Whitney area
            >> and
            >> Kearsarge Pass, which is the pass above Independence. The dangerous
            >> pass is Forester Pass which is just about exactly 4,000 meters high
            >> nad
            >> lies on the Kings/Kern divide. It's the highest pass on the trail
            >> between Mexico and Canada.
            >>
            >> I plan to cross it later this summer. I have been to the foot of the
            >> pass on both sides, but never over it. There are parts of the pass
            >> that
            >> require ice axes and glacier travel skills when the switchbacks are
            >> still covered with the ice clad drifts of the winter snowpack, as they
            >> must be now, June 3rd.
            >>
            >> I talked to a guy last spring who had saved a young woman's life after
            >> she managed to self arrest at the edge of a big sheer drop but could
            >> not
            >> climb back up. She had lost her footing while crossing one of the snow
            >> covered sections of the trail. He lowered a rope down and with a few
            >> people pulling they managed to pull her back up to a safer location.
            >> If
            >> she had not been carrying an ice ax which she was able to use for self
            >> arrest she would have catapulted over the edge to her death.
            >>
            >> http://inyopro.com/images/sheperds_alpine_meadow.html
            >>
            >> http://inyopro.com/images/tyndall_plateau_boulders.html
            >>
            >> http://inyopro.com/images/overlooking_forester_pass.html




            Pat Swovelin
            Cool Guy @ Large


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Trausti Hraunfjord
            A tree that size is truly impossible to understand... be it through pictures, panos or video. One will have to see and feel it in real life. ... on another
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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              A tree that size is truly impossible to understand... be it through
              pictures, panos or video. One will have to see and feel it in real life.

              ... on another thought... if there were trees of this size in Denmark, there
              would probably be a law prohibiting them to exist.
              There is a law that prohibits natural woods to exist there. Everything has
              to be clean and nice. If trees fall, they have to be removed, paths can not
              be overgrown etc. If you own land on which you have trees, you can receive
              a fine if you don't keep it manicured to the standards of the law.

              It is great to see nature's incredible things... and not only having to see
              clean and clear paths of pavement going between the trees.

              Trausti

              On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 5:07 PM, Pat Swovelin <panoramas@...>wrote:

              >
              > For those of you who have never been standing in front of the General
              > Sherman tree it's impossible to grasp the magnificence of this tree, no
              > matter how well it's shot (thank you, Ron), its sheer size is
              > staggering. This will put it into perspective for you. Before it broke
              > off in January of 2006 the largest branch of the tree was 6.8 *FEET* in
              > diameter and was 130 FEET above the ground. That's a full-sized tree as
              > far as I'm concerned and it was merely a branch of the General Sherman
              > tree.
              >
              > This tree, as well as the National Park its in, should be on your
              > things-I-must-see/do-before-I-die list. Up near the top.
              >
              >
              > Pat Swovelin
              > Cool Guy @ Large
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • pedro_silva58
              well, at least they have real trees... if they get lost in the forest they have to do more than stand up :-P
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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                well, at least they have real trees... if they get lost in the forest they have to do more than stand up :-P


                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Trausti Hraunfjord <trausti.hraunfjord@...> wrote:
                >
                > A tree that size is truly impossible to understand... be it through
                > pictures, panos or video. One will have to see and feel it in real life.
                >
                > ... on another thought... if there were trees of this size in Denmark, there
                > would probably be a law prohibiting them to exist.
                > There is a law that prohibits natural woods to exist there. Everything has
                > to be clean and nice. If trees fall, they have to be removed, paths can not
                > be overgrown etc. If you own land on which you have trees, you can receive
                > a fine if you don't keep it manicured to the standards of the law.
                >
                > It is great to see nature's incredible things... and not only having to see
                > clean and clear paths of pavement going between the trees.
                >
                > Trausti
                >
                > On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 5:07 PM, Pat Swovelin <panoramas@...>wrote:
                >
                > >
                > > For those of you who have never been standing in front of the General
                > > Sherman tree it's impossible to grasp the magnificence of this tree, no
                > > matter how well it's shot (thank you, Ron), its sheer size is
                > > staggering. This will put it into perspective for you. Before it broke
                > > off in January of 2006 the largest branch of the tree was 6.8 *FEET* in
                > > diameter and was 130 FEET above the ground. That's a full-sized tree as
                > > far as I'm concerned and it was merely a branch of the General Sherman
                > > tree.
                > >
                > > This tree, as well as the National Park its in, should be on your
                > > things-I-must-see/do-before-I-die list. Up near the top.
                > >
                > >
                > > Pat Swovelin
                > > Cool Guy @ Large
                > >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • onezebra1
                I ve been up there years ago; maybe on my next week off I will drive up there and use my pole setup to shoot some photos of the General Sherman tree along with
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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                  I've been up there years ago; maybe on my next week off I will drive up there and use my pole setup to shoot some photos of the General Sherman tree along with other places around there. Now if I just had a longer pole!
                  It is so beautiful up there, I should really try and get up there more often as it's only about a 5 hour drive from here.

                  Roger Berry
                • Bostjan Burger
                  Panos of sequoias are great! Tree is an amazing creature... yes I am proud that I live in country which 63% of area is covered with the forest. In last 15
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 3, 2010
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                    Panos of sequoias are great! Tree is an amazing creature... yes I am proud that I live in country which 63% of area is covered with the forest. In last 15 years the coverage with the forest has increased from 54% to present 63% ... and we are in the Central Europe...
                    :) Bostjan

                    --- On Fri, 6/4/10, Trausti Hraunfjord <trausti.hraunfjord@...> wrote:

                    From: Trausti Hraunfjord <trausti.hraunfjord@...>
                    Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Sequoia National Park panos (not Mt Whitney!)
                    To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Friday, June 4, 2010, 12:27 AM
















                     









                    A tree that size is truly impossible to understand... be it through

                    pictures, panos or video. One will have to see and feel it in real life.



                    ... on another thought... if there were trees of this size in Denmark, there

                    would probably be a law prohibiting them to exist.

                    There is a law that prohibits natural woods to exist there. Everything has

                    to be clean and nice. If trees fall, they have to be removed, paths can not

                    be overgrown etc. If you own land on which you have trees, you can receive

                    a fine if you don't keep it manicured to the standards of the law.



                    It is great to see nature's incredible things... and not only having to see

                    clean and clear paths of pavement going between the trees.



                    Trausti




















                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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