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Re: [PanoToolsNG] OmniGlobe projector

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  • Roger Howard
    It was a meeting of the American Association of Museums, but this years theme was Museums Without Borders and there were a large number of attendees from
    Message 1 of 6 , May 27 1:31 PM
      It was a meeting of the American Association of Museums, but this years
      theme was "Museums Without Borders" and there were a large number of
      attendees from institutions from outside the US, including a number of
      presenters speaking in Spanish and Chinese (with realtime translation).
      There was a focus on reducing the obsession with new technology except as a
      means to an end - museums, like most of us, have a tendency to get impressed
      with the latest "shiny object" and spend lots of their limited funds on
      dead-end tech-driven projects... some of the most refressing sessions were
      about how to better focus on the objectives/mission of an installation, and
      then fit technology to the problem (or, in many cases, avoid it entirely)
      rather than someone saying "hey, let's use iPads - that'd be cool! Now...
      what can we do with them?".

      The OmniGlobe projectors were on display by a few science museums, mainly,
      as a means to display geographic data in a natural format.

      As for the display in Munich, haven't seen it but sounds like a
      straightforward AR (augmented reality) application. I've seen great examples
      of this technology, but also many lame ones (Denver Art Museum talked about
      their use of AR which, after installation, it became obvious did not do
      anything to enhance the understanding of art, but rather became a fun toy
      for kids to play with and avoid the art).


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Wim Koornneef
      ... Hello Roger, Some time ago I had a PC tablet from Aldo Hoeben in my hands, on the display was a spherical pano. When I moved the tablet around the pano was
      Message 2 of 6 , May 28 1:01 AM
        Roger Howard wrote:
        > .....it became obvious did not do
        > anything to enhance the understanding of art, but rather became a fun toy
        > for kids to play with and avoid the art)......

        Hello Roger,

        Some time ago I had a PC tablet from Aldo Hoeben in my hands, on the display
        was a spherical pano.
        When I moved the tablet around the pano was also moving in sync.
        The combination of the pano content, the hardware and the technology is art
        and moving the tablet in all directions, from close to the floor to high
        above me with stretched arms was really fun to do so that is why I like the
        combination of art and fun a lot.
        For me there is absolutely no need to understand the art, it is all about
        what art is doing for/with/in me.

        Some time ago I made a series of panos for a nature reserve parc, the panos
        where displayed on touch screen monitors in an exhibition to inform the
        visitors about the parc.
        Instead of exploring the scenes a large group of young school children
        played with the touch sceens and explored all the possibilities of the
        screens, they didn't care about the panos and all they did was playing.

        I really loved it to see there enthusiasm and I was glad to see how they mis
        used the intentional purpose of the screens and the panos because I knew
        that those kids where exploring the world in their own way.

        Wim
        --
        View this message in context: http://panotoolsng.586017.n4.nabble.com/OmniGlobe-projector-tp2233690p2234238.html
        Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
      • michael crane
        ... The thing I saw was some years ago and done with mirrors. I have never figured out how it is done. you are stood on a little balustrade and look into a
        Message 3 of 6 , May 28 9:05 AM
          On Thu, May 27, 2010 9:31 pm, Roger Howard wrote:

          > As for the display in Munich, haven't seen it but sounds like a
          > straightforward AR (augmented reality) application.
          The thing I saw was some years ago and done with mirrors. I have never
          figured out how it is done.
          you are stood on a little balustrade and look into a scene and there you
          are tiny in the duplicate balustrade in front of you.
        • Roger Howard
          ... By this I was referring to art museums, where there mission is, afterall, to educate about art - where technology is used for its own sake in this context
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 1, 2010
            On Fri, May 28, 2010 at 1:01 AM, Wim Koornneef <wim.koornneef@...>wrote:

            >
            > For me there is absolutely no need to understand the art, it is all about
            > what art is doing for/with/in me.
            >
            >
            >

            By this I was referring to art museums, where there mission is, afterall, to
            educate about art - where technology is used for its own sake in this
            context (like in schools) it's a failure, even if it is novel and fun for
            the user.

            -R


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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