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New York skyline panoramas -- historic comparisons

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  • panovrx
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg or http://tiny.cc/jz2j0 four versions from 1876 ... My
    Message 1 of 10 , May 22, 2010
      http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg

      or http://tiny.cc/jz2j0

      four versions from 1876 ...

      My understanding is that rotating lens or rotating camera panorama cameras were not popular until flexible film was invented. These cameras produce cylindrical perspectives (unless you are talking about a digital scanning camera with a fisheye lens). So the earliest one at least must be a print composite or a digital stitch from a print composite scan I would say.

      Peter M
    • John Riley
      ... The http://tiny.cc URL: You fail at it! LOL! Unless, of course, you wanted to link to this article: SJSU professor helps foil attempted bank robbery
      Message 2 of 10 , May 22, 2010
        On May 23, 2010, at 12:03 AM, panovrx wrote:

        > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg
        >
        > or http://tiny.cc/jz2j0
        >
        > four versions from 1876 ...
        >
        > My understanding is that rotating lens or rotating camera panorama cameras were not popular until flexible film was invented. These cameras produce cylindrical perspectives (unless you are talking about a digital scanning camera with a fisheye lens). So the earliest one at least must be a print composite or a digital stitch from a print composite scan I would say.
        >
        > Peter M

        The http://tiny.cc URL: You fail at it! LOL! Unless, of course, you wanted to link to this article: SJSU professor helps foil attempted bank robbery

        Those panos are quite cool though. I wonder if the first was shot from a balloon?


        John Riley
        johnriley@...
        (h)864-461-3504
        (c)864-431-7075
        (w)864-503-5775

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • panovrx
        ... http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg ... Yes that had me puzzled too. If it was from a
        Message 3 of 10 , May 23, 2010
          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, John Riley <johnriley@...> wrote:

          http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg
          > >


          > The http://tiny.cc URL: You fail at it! LOL! Unless, of course, you wanted to link to this article: SJSU professor helps foil attempted bank robbery

          > Those panos are quite cool though. I wonder if the first was shot from a balloon?
          >
          >
          Yes that had me puzzled too. If it was from a balloon the photographer did well to join the pictures. What strikes me about the first one too is how enormous a construction the bridge pylon was compared to the existing buildings then.

          Peter M
        • Michel Thoby
          ... Hi Peter, IMHO the earliest panorama that you have shown us is an original print composite, the seams of which were cleaned by a (recent) digital
          Message 4 of 10 , May 23, 2010
            Le 23 mai 2010 à 06:03, panovrx a écrit :

            > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg
            ...
            >
            > four versions from 1876 ...
            >
            > My understanding is that rotating lens or rotating camera panorama cameras were not popular until flexible film was invented. These cameras produce cylindrical perspectives (unless you are talking about a digital scanning camera with a fisheye lens). So the earliest one at least must be a print composite or a digital stitch from a print composite scan I would say.
            >
            > Peter M


            Hi Peter,

            IMHO the earliest panorama that you have shown us is an original print composite, the seams of which were cleaned by a (recent) digital treatment.
            You probably know that a brief history of panoramic photography is presented by the Library of Congress:
            http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/panoramic_photo/
            This history is along with thousands (!) of wonderful old panoramic images dated from 1851 to 1991 (including many of the New York water front and skyline BTW ;-)
            All these panoramic photographies can be downloaded at will and at a respectable large resolution.
            There is also a "Seeing change over time" sequence and a vintage (Dec. 1992) video lesson for "Shooting a Panoramic Photography" (with a Cirkut camera)!

            That is a real and fascinating treasure to explore IMO. The link has been shared several times on this list and on other forums but I think it is worthwhile to repeat once more.

            Michel

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Trausti Hraunfjord
            In a way one can truthfully say that the traffic net in NY is still in the same state it was back in 1880... (assuming the bridge was operational by then) The
            Message 5 of 10 , May 23, 2010
              In a way one can truthfully say that the traffic net in NY is still in the
              same state it was back in 1880... (assuming the bridge was operational by
              then)

              The oldest pano offers the most friendly view. With the highrises, the city
              looks cold and distant and dead - impersonal.

              Trausti

              On Sat, May 22, 2010 at 11:03 PM, panovrx <panovrx@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              >
              > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg
              >
              > or http://tiny.cc/jz2j0
              >
              > four versions from 1876 ...
              >
              > My understanding is that rotating lens or rotating camera panorama cameras
              > were not popular until flexible film was invented. These cameras produce
              > cylindrical perspectives (unless you are talking about a digital scanning
              > camera with a fisheye lens). So the earliest one at least must be a print
              > composite or a digital stitch from a print composite scan I would say.
              >
              > Peter M
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ian Wood
              They weren t popular, but there were swing-lens camera using the daguerrotype process, using a curved metal plate. That was around 1850 so before the first of
              Message 6 of 10 , May 23, 2010
                They weren't popular, but there were swing-lens camera using the
                daguerrotype process, using a curved metal plate. That was around 1850
                so before the first of those NY panoramas, but like Michel says, I'm
                fairly sure that's one of the Library of Congress's digitally cleaned
                up ones from separate images.

                Ian

                On 23 May 2010, at 05:03, panovrx wrote:

                > My understanding is that rotating lens or rotating camera panorama
                > cameras were not popular until flexible film was invented.
              • cyberneddy
                ... Most likely, the first pano was shot from the bridge tower on the Brooklyn side. The bridge opened on May 24, 1883. And when the 1876 pano was shot, there
                Message 7 of 10 , May 23, 2010
                  On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 4:39 AM, panovrx <panovrx@...> wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  Most likely, the first pano was shot from the bridge tower on the Brooklyn
                  side.
                  The bridge opened on May 24, 1883. And when the 1876 pano was shot, there
                  were pigs roaming the streets of Manhattan. ;-)

                  > mb
                  >
                  > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com <PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com>, John
                  > Riley <johnriley@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_0X1ggm5ZqsA/S-gOXI6cYVI/AAAAAAAAFC8/9LIc9SI1xb8/s1600/ny-panoramic-900.jpg
                  > > >
                  >
                  > > Those panos are quite cool though. I wonder if the first was shot from a
                  > balloon?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > Yes that had me puzzled too. If it was from a balloon the photographer did
                  > well to join the pictures. What strikes me about the first one too is how
                  > enormous a construction the bridge pylon was compared to the existing
                  > buildings then.
                  >
                  > Peter M
                  >
                  >
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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Trausti Hraunfjord
                  On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 4:11 PM, cyberneddy wrote: ...when the 1876 pano was shot, there were pigs roaming the streets of Manhattan. ;-) ...
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 23, 2010
                    On Sun, May 23, 2010 at 4:11 PM, cyberneddy <bazura@...> wrote:
                    ...when the 1876 pano was shot, there were pigs roaming the streets of
                    Manhattan. ;-)

                    :) ... the pigs are still there... only thing that has changed; now they
                    are called "Investment Bankers" :)


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • jeffreycb2000
                    I d say they were taken from the pylon as well - as a rule of thumb if the tops of near and far objects are level with the horizon then they are level with
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 26, 2010
                      I'd say they were taken from the pylon as well - as a rule of thumb if the tops of near and far objects are level with the horizon then they are level with your eye (roughly) then you are about the same height as that object.
                      It's a rule of thumb we use for architectural perspectives in setting up urban street views, etc.
                      Its a great example of the importance of historical panoramas to record the changes over time.
                      Regards
                      Jeffrey Briant.

                      Ps there is a delightful study "Biographical Note" booklet of a photographer in Australia and New Zealand called Melvin Vaniman 1866-1912. The book is by Alan Tierney in Sydney for around $20 Aust. Melvin was an adventurer who specialised in taking balloon and pole panoramas around 1900- 1910. The balloons were generally tethered while the pole shots were taken a top a 60 foot mobile pole contraption! Of course he climbed to the top to take the photos. The images in the booklet are only photocopies, but are amazing considering when and how they were taken. He took the famous panorama images of sydney, newcastle, katoomba, bathurst, etc, etc.
                      Let me know if your interested and I can dig out Alan's contact details.
                      JB



                      > Most likely, the first pano was shot from the bridge tower on the Brooklyn
                      > side.
                      > The bridge opened on May 24, 1883. And when the 1876 pano was shot, there
                      > were pigs roaming the streets of Manhattan. ;-)
                      >

                      > >
                      > > > Those panos are quite cool though. I wonder if the first was shot from a
                      > > balloon?
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > Yes that had me puzzled too. If it was from a balloon the photographer did
                      > > well to join the pictures. What strikes me about the first one too is how
                      > > enormous a construction the bridge pylon was compared to the existing
                      > > buildings then.
                      > >
                      > > Peter M
                    • Pat Swovelin
                      On 5-26-2010 3:46 AM, jeffreycb2000 s hamster got loose on the keyboard ... Yes, please. ... Pat Swovelin Cool Guy @ Large [Non-text portions of this message
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 28, 2010
                        On 5-26-2010 3:46 AM, jeffreycb2000's hamster got loose on the keyboard
                        and typed ...:
                        > I'd say they were taken from the pylon as well - as a rule of thumb if
                        > the tops of near and far objects are level with the horizon then they
                        > are level with your eye (roughly) then you are about the same height
                        > as that object.
                        > It's a rule of thumb we use for architectural perspectives in setting
                        > up urban street views, etc.
                        > Its a great example of the importance of historical panoramas to
                        > record the changes over time.
                        > Regards
                        > Jeffrey Briant.
                        >
                        > Ps there is a delightful study "Biographical Note" booklet of a
                        > photographer in Australia and New Zealand called Melvin Vaniman
                        > 1866-1912. The book is by Alan Tierney in Sydney for around $20 Aust.
                        > Melvin was an adventurer who specialised in taking balloon and pole
                        > panoramas around 1900- 1910. The balloons were generally tethered
                        > while the pole shots were taken a top a 60 foot mobile pole
                        > contraption! Of course he climbed to the top to take the photos. The
                        > images in the booklet are only photocopies, but are amazing
                        > considering when and how they were taken. He took the famous panorama
                        > images of sydney, newcastle, katoomba, bathurst, etc, etc.
                        > Let me know if your interested and I can dig out Alan's contact details.

                        Yes, please.

                        > JB
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >> Most likely, the first pano was shot from the bridge tower on the
                        >> Brooklyn
                        >> side.
                        >> The bridge opened on May 24, 1883. And when the 1876 pano was shot, there
                        >> were pigs roaming the streets of Manhattan. ;-)
                        >>
                        >
                        >>>
                        >>>> Those panos are quite cool though. I wonder if the first was shot
                        >>>> from a
                        >>> balloon?
                        >>>>
                        >>>>
                        >>> Yes that had me puzzled too. If it was from a balloon the
                        >>> photographer did
                        >>> well to join the pictures. What strikes me about the first one too
                        >>> is how
                        >>> enormous a construction the bridge pylon was compared to the existing
                        >>> buildings then.
                        >>>
                        >>> Peter M



                        Pat Swovelin
                        Cool Guy @ Large


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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