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>2gb images?

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  • Zoran Zorkic
    I finally got to make 1gp stitched images, but I m at loss how to open them in Photoshop? The final image is under 4gb. 3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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      I finally got to make >1gp stitched images, but I'm at loss how to open them in Photoshop?
      The final image is under 4gb.
      3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel tiff.

      After I wrapped my head around Nip2, I can actually do stuff with the image, so I tried PNG and radiance but no go.
      Funny thing though, the radiance file came out as 1.9gb but PS CS4 still doesn't open it.

      Nip2 says that the uncompressed is 5.9gb, which could be the problem for importing to PS :(
      I have 8gb of ram which should be enough, but also plan to do a major upgrade so memory won't be a problem.
      Damn I hate it when the software is lagging behind hardware! :(
      Any suggestions?

      BTW: win7 x64 PS CS4 x64 here
    • bohonus
      can you render it out as a .psb file (Photoshop Large Document Format)?
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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        can you render it out as a .psb file (Photoshop Large Document Format)?


        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Zoran Zorkic" <zomba@...> wrote:
        >
        > I finally got to make >1gp stitched images, but I'm at loss how to open them in Photoshop?
        > The final image is under 4gb.
        > 3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel tiff.
      • Zoran Zorkic
        ... Erm, no? If I could, there would be no problem. Maybe you know of a PNG (or TIF or radiance) to PSB converter? Why PNG? AFAIK PNG doesn t have the
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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          >can you render it out as a .psb file (Photoshop Large Document Format)?

          Erm, no? If I could, there would be no problem.

          Maybe you know of a PNG (or TIF or radiance) to PSB converter?
          Why PNG?
          AFAIK PNG doesn't have the limitations on filesize likeTIF and supports up to 64bpp images.





          >--- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Zoran Zorkic" <zomba@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> I finally got to make >1gp stitched images, but I'm at loss how to open them in Photoshop?
          >> The final image is under 4gb.
          >> 3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel tiff.





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Roger Howard
          ... Photoshop CS4 here opens 3+GB TIFFs fine, though many apps can t. Do you really have 16 bits worth of useful data in those tiles? If not, save on memory
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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            On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 2:44 PM, bohonus <bradford@...> wrote:

            >
            > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com <PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com>, "Zoran
            > Zorkic" <zomba@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I finally got to make >1gp stitched images, but I'm at loss how to open
            > them in Photoshop?
            > > The final image is under 4gb.
            > > 3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel tiff
            >

            Photoshop CS4 here opens 3+GB TIFFs fine, though many apps can't.

            Do you really have 16 bits worth of useful data in those tiles? If not, save
            on memory and storage and drop them down to 8bit per channel.

            Is the TIFF compressed? If not, try compressing using deflate/ZIP - that's
            pretty good for 16 bit data and may well help Photoshop open the file by
            bringing it down under 2GB, where some of the mysteries seem to stop
            (Photoshop seems to have no problem with <2GB TIFFs, but seems to have
            problems with SOME TIFFs that are 2 to 4GB).

            IIRC, some large TIFFs are not openable in Photoshop for some reason - do
            you have tiffinfo installed? It's part of tifflib. If you have tifflib, you
            might also try using tiffcp to convert the TIFF to another flavor.

            Or you could use Photoshop tiling as I mentioned before and just skip right
            past this all :)

            -R


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Roger Howard
            One final thought - you can (IIRC) generate raw RGB data, without header, from VIPS... you would open this in Photoshop using the Photoshop RAW option (this is
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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              One final thought - you can (IIRC) generate raw RGB data, without header,
              from VIPS... you would open this in Photoshop using the Photoshop RAW option
              (this is not related to digital camera raw formats). I don't believe there's
              any specific limit as there is no format to speak of - just a bunch of raw
              RGB triplets.

              -R


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Zoran Zorkic
              ... Not here, and not for some other people. ... At the moment it s only ~12 bits, but I hope to work out the kinks in my workflow and do HDR later. ... It s
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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                >--Original Message Text---
                >From: Roger Howard
                >Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 15:34:20 -0800

                >
                >On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 2:44 PM, bohonus <bradford@...> wrote:

                >>
                >> --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com <PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com>, "Zoran
                >> Zorkic" <zomba@...> wrote:
                >> >
                >> > I finally got to make >1gp stitched images, but I'm at loss how to open
                >> them in Photoshop?
                >> > The final image is under 4gb.
                >> > 3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel tiff
                >>

                >Photoshop CS4 here opens 3+GB TIFFs fine, though many apps can't.

                Not here, and not for some other people.

                >Do you really have 16 bits worth of useful data in those tiles? If not, save
                >on memory and storage and drop them down to 8bit per channel.

                At the moment it's only ~12 bits, but I hope to work out the kinks in my workflow and do HDR later.

                >Is the TIFF compressed? If not, try compressing using deflate/ZIP - that's
                >pretty good for 16 bit data and may well help Photoshop open the file by
                >bringing it down under 2GB, where some of the mysteries seem to stop
                >(Photoshop seems to have no problem with <2GB TIFFs, but seems to have
                >problems with SOME TIFFs that are 2 to 4GB).

                It's compressed already, uncompressed comes to 5.9gb.


                >IIRC, some large TIFFs are not openable in Photoshop for some reason - do
                >you have tiffinfo installed? It's part of tifflib. If you have tifflib, you
                >might also try using tiffcp to convert the TIFF to another flavor.

                Yeah tried that one first, thinking I didn't compressed it by error. Tried other compression options, all yeild the same result :/

                >Or you could use Photoshop tiling as I mentioned before and just skip right
                >past this all :)

                I'll certanely look into Photoshop scripting, but I'm not sure how well it'll scale.
                Sure, up to 2 gp feasible, but more, I doubt it, unless I threw ungodly amount of ram at it :D







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Zoran Zorkic
                ... Nice! Thanks! I totally forgot about raw RAW! :D I ll try it out at once! Thanks again!
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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                  >--Original Message Text---
                  >From: Roger Howard
                  >Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 15:37:14 -0800

                  >

                  >One final thought - you can (IIRC) generate raw RGB data, without header,
                  >from VIPS... you would open this in Photoshop using the Photoshop RAW option
                  >(this is not related to digital camera raw formats). I don't believe there's
                  >any specific limit as there is no format to speak of - just a bunch of raw
                  >RGB triplets.

                  Nice! Thanks!
                  I totally forgot about raw RAW! :D
                  I'll try it out at once!
                  Thanks again!
                • bohonus
                  ... And how am I to know that?
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 24, 2010
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                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Zoran Zorkic" <zomba@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > >can you render it out as a .psb file (Photoshop Large Document Format)?
                    >
                    > Erm, no? If I could, there would be no problem.

                    And how am I to know that?
                  • Roger Howard
                    ... Sorry I wasn t more clear - I don t remember the TIFF options that make/break this support, but Photoshop can generate TIFFs up to 4GB and will read those;
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 25, 2010
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                      On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 4:11 PM, Zoran Zorkic <zomba@...> wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > >--Original Message Text---
                      > >From: Roger Howard
                      > >Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 15:34:20 -0800
                      >
                      >
                      > >
                      > >On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 2:44 PM, bohonus <bradford@...<bradford%40vrseattle.com>>
                      > wrote:
                      >
                      > >>
                      > >> --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com <PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com><PanoToolsNG%
                      > 40yahoogroups.com>, "Zoran
                      >
                      > >> Zorkic" <zomba@...> wrote:
                      > >> >
                      > >> > I finally got to make >1gp stitched images, but I'm at loss how to
                      > open
                      > >> them in Photoshop?
                      > >> > The final image is under 4gb.
                      > >> > 3.6gb 24000x44000 16bpc 3 channel tiff
                      > >>
                      >
                      > >Photoshop CS4 here opens 3+GB TIFFs fine, though many apps can't.
                      >
                      > Not here, and not for some other people.
                      >

                      Sorry I wasn't more clear - I don't remember the TIFF options that
                      make/break this support, but Photoshop can generate TIFFs up to 4GB and will
                      read those; but it can't read *all* 2-4GB TIFFs. I'm not sure if this is
                      related to the compression method, tiling vs strips, planar vs. interleaved
                      samples, or what.



                      > >Do you really have 16 bits worth of useful data in those tiles? If not,
                      > save
                      > >on memory and storage and drop them down to 8bit per channel.
                      >
                      > At the moment it's only ~12 bits, but I hope to work out the kinks in my
                      > workflow and do HDR later.
                      >
                      >
                      > >Is the TIFF compressed? If not, try compressing using deflate/ZIP - that's
                      > >pretty good for 16 bit data and may well help Photoshop open the file by
                      > >bringing it down under 2GB, where some of the mysteries seem to stop
                      > >(Photoshop seems to have no problem with <2GB TIFFs, but seems to have
                      > >problems with SOME TIFFs that are 2 to 4GB).
                      >
                      > It's compressed already, uncompressed comes to 5.9gb.
                      >
                      >
                      > >IIRC, some large TIFFs are not openable in Photoshop for some reason - do
                      > >you have tiffinfo installed? It's part of tifflib. If you have tifflib,
                      > you
                      > >might also try using tiffcp to convert the TIFF to another flavor.
                      >
                      > Yeah tried that one first, thinking I didn't compressed it by error. Tried
                      > other compression options, all yeild the same result :/
                      >

                      How about the strips vs. tiles? try using the -s and -t options.



                      >Or you could use Photoshop tiling as I mentioned before and just skip right
                      >past this all :)

                      I'll certanely look into Photoshop scripting, but I'm not sure how well
                      > it'll scale.
                      > Sure, up to 2 gp feasible, but more, I doubt it, unless I threw ungodly
                      > amount of ram at it :D
                      >

                      Well if your goal is to get the file into Photoshop anyway, I'm not sure why
                      you wouldn't just do it directly in Photoshop - it greatly simplifies the
                      workflow with large files. Photoshop scaling is well known - run it on a 64
                      bit system with lots of main memory, put a fast volume as scratch. Granted,
                      opening and merging in throusands of tiles wont be as fast as with more
                      dedicated apps, but ultimately you're hitting a wall with your workflow that
                      you wouldn't if you did it directly in PS. So do you want fast and not
                      working, or somewhat slower and working?

                      -R


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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