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Joining tiled images?

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  • Zoran Zorkic
    Hi! I have an array of tiles which I d like to join in a big (gigapixel) image. They connect perfectly so no need of transforming or blending. They re order in
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 24, 2010
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      Hi!
      I have an array of tiles which I'd like to join in a big (gigapixel) image.
      They connect perfectly so no need of transforming or blending.

      They're order in a 2d array like:
      a-0-0.tif
      a-0-1.tif
      a-0-2.tif
      a-1-0.tif
      a-1-1.tif
      a-1-2.tif
      ...

      I was thinking of writing a Ptstitcher script, but got stuck thinking :)
      How would one go about it?

      I did try Nip2 and Fiji, but Nip2 documentation is barely here.
      Fiji doesn't handle alpha channels (which the images have) and when if I do strip the alpha and try stitch there it tries to load the whole thing into memory which, well doesn't quite work as I only have 8gb
      of ram.

      Maybe if someone here knows it's way around Nip2 can enlighten me :)
      TIA!
    • Roger Howard
      ... Photoshop and a JavaScript to handle the opening and placement of each tile into a master image. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 24, 2010
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        On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 9:28 AM, Zoran Zorkic <zomba@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hi!
        > I have an array of tiles which I'd like to join in a big (gigapixel) image.
        > They connect perfectly so no need of transforming or blending.
        >
        > They're order in a 2d array like:
        > a-0-0.tif
        > a-0-1.tif
        > a-0-2.tif
        > a-1-0.tif
        > a-1-1.tif
        > a-1-2.tif
        > ...
        >
        > I was thinking of writing a Ptstitcher script, but got stuck thinking :)
        > How would one go about it?
        >

        Photoshop and a JavaScript to handle the opening and placement of each tile
        into a master image.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Zoran Zorkic
        ... Hmm, could be, but Nip2 should be faster and more efficient. Anyway got it working in Nip2. The lack of documentation is unbelivable. But alas, got stuck
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 24, 2010
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          >--Original Message Text---
          >From: Roger Howard
          >Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:48:49 -0800

          >On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 9:28 AM, Zoran Zorkic <zomba@...> wrote:

          >> I have an array of tiles which I'd like to join in a big (gigapixel) image.
          >> They connect perfectly so no need of transforming or blending.

          >> I was thinking of writing a Ptstitcher script, but got stuck thinking :)
          >> How would one go about it?
          >>

          >Photoshop and a JavaScript to handle the opening and placement of each tile
          >into a master image.

          Hmm, could be, but Nip2 should be faster and more efficient.
          Anyway got it working in Nip2. The lack of documentation is unbelivable.
          But alas, got stuck on the output format :(
          Can Photoshop open anything bigger than 2gb in a format besides PSB?



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Roger Howard
          ... I used to use VIPS for large tiling work about 8 years ago at a museum, but more recently I ve found photoshop to be more than adequate for my needs - it s
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 24, 2010
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            On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 12:43 PM, Zoran Zorkic <zomba@...> wrote:

            >
            > Hmm, could be, but Nip2 should be faster and more efficient.
            > Anyway got it working in Nip2. The lack of documentation is unbelivable.
            > But alas, got stuck on the output format :(
            > Can Photoshop open anything bigger than 2gb in a format besides PSB?
            >

            I used to use VIPS for large tiling work about 8 years ago at a museum, but
            more recently I've found photoshop to be more than adequate for my needs -
            it's on every workstation I touch, deals OK (finally) with very large
            images. If you need >2GB you can still use TIFF up to 4GB (looking forward
            to BigTIFF support someday), or you can just use PSB and not worry about any
            practical limits. Since TIFF supports several useful compression options and
            varying bit depths, a 4GB TIFF can well be quite larger than it would
            suggest if you were using only uncompressed data.

            Of course Photoshop is still not ideal for extremely large work, but it has
            the benefits of being popular and having several excellent scripting options
            (a few Saturday nights ago I put together a tile merging script for a friend
            halfway across the planet, sent it to him, and let him run on a large tile
            set without needing to deal with any installation issues, training, etc). If
            you're working beyond its limits, by all means go with something
            specialized.

            -R


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Zoran Zorkic
            ... Ah, therein I think lies the problem. It s not 4gb compressed, but 4gb UNCOPRESSED limit. All TIFFs under 4gb uncopressed opened OK, but compressed no,
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 24, 2010
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              >--Original Message Text---
              >From: Roger Howard
              >Date: Wed, 24 Feb 2010 15:23:50 -0800

              >images. If you need >2GB you can still use TIFF up to 4GB (looking forward
              >to BigTIFF support someday), or you can just use PSB and not worry about any
              >practical limits. Since TIFF supports several useful compression options and
              >varying bit depths, a 4GB TIFF can well be quite larger than it would
              >suggest if you were using only uncompressed data.

              Ah, therein I think lies the problem. It's not 4gb compressed, but 4gb UNCOPRESSED limit.
              All TIFFs under 4gb uncopressed opened OK, but compressed no, even though the filesize is below 4gb.

              >Of course Photoshop is still not ideal for extremely large work, but it has

              Yup, but it's indispensible. I'll probaly end up using both Nip2 and Photoshop.
              I'll just crop the image into the biggest sensible parts and use that in Photoshop, merge back later.
            • Roger Howard
              ... Nope, the limit is on the final compressed TIFF, because the limit has to do with the internal TIFF tag addresses, which are calculated based on the
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 25, 2010
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                On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 3:50 PM, Zoran Zorkic <zomba@...> wrote:

                >
                >
                > >images. If you need >2GB you can still use TIFF up to 4GB (looking forward
                > >to BigTIFF support someday), or you can just use PSB and not worry about
                > any
                > >practical limits. Since TIFF supports several useful compression options
                > and
                > >varying bit depths, a 4GB TIFF can well be quite larger than it would
                > >suggest if you were using only uncompressed data.
                >
                > Ah, therein I think lies the problem. It's not 4gb compressed, but 4gb
                > UNCOPRESSED limit.
                > All TIFFs under 4gb uncopressed opened OK, but compressed no, even though
                > the filesize is below 4gb.
                >

                Nope, the limit is on the final compressed TIFF, because the limit has to do
                with the internal TIFF tag addresses, which are calculated based on the
                location of the stored (compressed) samples, which are 32 bit unsigned. It
                would be easier if the limit were on the uncompressed - at least then you'd
                always know if a file was going to be too big to save (it's impossible to
                know if your 10GB uncompressed image will fit in a 4GB compressed TIFF until
                you try - and sometimes fail!



                >
                > >Of course Photoshop is still not ideal for extremely large work, but it
                > has
                >
                > Yup, but it's indispensible. I'll probaly end up using both Nip2 and
                > Photoshop.
                > I'll just crop the image into the biggest sensible parts and use that in
                > Photoshop, merge back later.
                >

                Yes, if you want the best of both you might using nip2 to merge tiles
                together up to a size you know can be opened (as a TIFF) in Photoshop. Then
                open those super-tiles in Photoshop and merge... that way you'd avoid the
                overhead of lots of small file operations which Photoshop isn't the most
                efficient at.

                -R


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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