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Thinking like publishers...

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  • Mathew Hargreaves
    Hi, I, like a lot of others end up giving away the prints to friends and making no money. I use a quality lab for panoramic images when printing for myself and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 28, 2010
      Hi,

      I, like a lot of others end up giving away the prints to friends
      and making no money. I use a quality lab for panoramic images when
      printing for myself and framing them. Its the cost that can be a killer,
      when a 12x50 is $150 and about $100 for a 12x36 giclee Epson print. Its
      not cost effective for a framed consumer print.
      There is an art gallery interested in handling my panoramic photos
      and they think they can sell them. They do not compete against the other
      types of art they have or other photographers. Hence it is a good fit.
      So I have sized the images to 17", 23", and 35". The smallest size
      allows me to print them two up. The actual paper length is one inch
      longer as I build in white borders for mounting to mats.
      I have shown them Costco prints and they loved them. I love them
      because they are low cost to print and look great when they turn off the
      "auto color correct". The weak point is the paper choices are gloss and
      lustre. I prefer a satin finish paper but it is not available. I have a
      possible but limited market field to sell to.
      So try taking a look at the art galleries in your area and catering
      your images to the tourist trade. The images in serveral sizes will
      allow the customer a greater choice in size. Obviously the completely
      framed photo will command the highest price especially if you make it
      look its best. You can still have some available at lower cost if it is
      only matted, or if tube rolled. If you do tubes for selling, it is
      advisable to place the print into a plastic bag inside. This is due to
      the high acid content in cardboard papers.
      Mail order the frames and mats. But cut the mats yourself if you
      have the space and equipment. The glass can be pricey even for single
      thickness, and archival glass is probably prohibitive due to cost.
      My first rule on images or photos is the computer screen version
      means nothing until you actually print the picture. None of my images is
      on the web because computer monitors just do not do them justice for
      viewing.
      I doubt there is a web based market for panoramics. Their fit into
      normal publishing is just not there. All the publishers are trying to
      make a web based profit model work - and failing mostly. Everyone wants
      everything free, or so cheap the content provider cannot make enough to
      make it worthwhile. Driving a potential buyer to your images will be
      very difficult. This is why I recommend the gallery approach taylored to
      your market.
      If I do not go broke being unemployed, then I plan on getting a
      decent monitor like the NEC or HP Dreamcolor. I bought a 64 bit quadcore
      with 8 gigs of ram to replace my Windows 98 'puter. These barely
      affordable upgrades will also allow me to finally work in 16 bit and
      stitch more photos than four. I also added a second hardrive for backup
      along with a portable. Before doing the monitor I will probably go for
      the software ubgrades.

      CHEERS...Mathew
    • Crane
      ... On 28 Jan 2010, at 21:48, Mathew Hargreaves ... Dohh
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 28, 2010
        ...

        On 28 Jan 2010, at 21:48, Mathew Hargreaves
        <mathewdh@...> wrote:
        >
        > I doubt there is a web based market for panoramics.
        Dohh
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