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Re: [PanoToolsNG] oh God they're using GSV already :-(

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  • Greg Nuspel
    I guess he should be called the Accidental Artist. ... From: AYRTON To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, January 01, 2010 11:51 PM Subject:
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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      I guess he should be called the Accidental Artist.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: AYRTON
      To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, January 01, 2010 11:51 PM
      Subject: [PanoToolsNG] oh God they're using GSV already :-(



      Ge
      read this about
      a photo exposition using scenes and parts from GSV scenes:

      <
      http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/10/view/8402/jon-rafman-google-street-views.html
      >

      [ ]s
      AYRTON

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      + 55 21 9982 6313
      http://ayrton360.com
      follow-me : twitter.com/ayrton360

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    • Keith Martin
      ... I ll add my tuppence if that s ok, as this is an area that s not disconnected with what I do in my day job. ;-) Part of what can turn something into art is
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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        Sometime around 2/1/10 (at 01:06 -0800) Wim Koornneef said:

        >IMO, only the words above are real art ;-)

        I'll add my tuppence if that's ok, as this is an area that's not
        disconnected with what I do in my day job. ;-)

        Part of what can turn something into art is the conscious selection
        and change of context.

        Take, for example, Eugenie Scrase's 'Trunkated Trunk', which is the
        remains of a treetrunk and the metal fence it fell on. This artwork,
        the winning piece of the recent School of Saatchi reality TV show, is
        the result of seeing the thing itself, imagining it in the context of
        art rather than mundane physical object or event, and finally
        actually taking it from the original location and presenting it in
        its new context.

        Although it is fun to argue the toss of what makes art 'art', and
        also the perceived value difference between 'found' art and year-long
        painting or sculpting efforts, this was clearly the best piece of the
        whole show.

        BBC news article:
        http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/arts_and_culture/8412705.stm

        Insightful comment responding to a slightly bitchy blog post:
        http://coxsoft.blogspot.com/2009/12/trunk-wins-saatchi.html#c6305851199802655674

        -

        Anyway, I found the GSV-sourced artwork to be interesting and
        provocative. Selecting images and presenting them out of context in
        this way, not to mention using them to provoke debate, is a worthy
        effort. What's interesting, as well, is how this underlines the need
        to consider the artist as someone not necessarily involved in the
        original creation of the source image.

        This also raises interesting questions about copyright - but whatever
        the result of *that* debate, it doesn't change the fact that Rafman
        applied some creative thinking, selection and context-changing ideas
        in a way that, I feel, qualifies as art. Much like Marcel Duchamp did
        with his 'fountain'
        (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fountain_%28Duchamp%29) in 1917,
        although I don't mean to drawn any kind of qualitative comparison.

        Whether you *like* what Rafman has done or not is a separate issue;
        that is a totally individual subjective thing. And whether the
        GSV-sourced work is *great* (or even good) art is yet another
        question, of course, and one I'm not about to jump into! But, again,
        I don't feel that it is *not* art.

        k
      • Wim Koornneef
        Hello Keith, You made your point ;-) and you are right, it is impossible to discuss if something is art or not because Art is in the mind of the beholder. I
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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          Hello Keith,

          You made your point ;-) and you are right, it is impossible to discuss if
          something is art or not because Art is in the mind of the beholder.

          I found the words that described the use of GSV for art funny and over the
          top. When I read this kind of text (this author isn't unique for doing so) I
          always have the feeling that those people are using there well choosen
          combination of words to pimp there products up to a "higher level".
          Making people accept this is for me real Art :-)

          Wim




          Keith Martin-2 wrote:
          >
          > ....I don't feel that it is *not* art.....
          >

          --
          View this message in context: http://n4.nabble.com/oh-God-they-re-using-GSV-already-tp997102p997206.html
          Sent from the PanoToolsNG mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
        • Keith Martin
          ... Yes, there is definitely a lot of pimp my art going on in this industry. Sometimes the descriptions really *are* the most creative thing. :-) k
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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            Sometime around 2/1/10 (at 04:32 -0800) Wim Koornneef said:

            >well choosen
            >combination of words to pimp there products up to a "higher level".

            Yes, there is definitely a lot of "pimp my art" going on in this
            industry. Sometimes the descriptions really *are* the most creative
            thing. :-)

            k
          • luca vascon
            montreal based artist jon rafman has been working on a series of photographic pieces that use images sourced from google’s street view map system. afman has
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 2, 2010
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              montreal based artist jon rafman has been working on a series of
              photographic pieces that use images
              sourced from google�s street view map system. afman has selected odd and
              intriguing still frames
              captured by the car-mounted cameras google uses to take images of cities
              with. each work is mounted
              and blown up to larger scale for the final presentation. rafman isn�t the
              original photographer but instead
              searches through google street views, taking screenshots of images. he
              explains, �the world captured by
              google appears to be more truthful and more transparent because of the
              weight accorded to external
              reality, the perception of a neutral, unbiased recording, and even the
              vastness of the project�.
              ----

              >well choosen
              > >combination of words to pimp there products up to a "higher level".
              >

              I reject New Topography
              Please, go and watch Wim Veinders'movie Lisbon Story once again.
              And two times the worlds by Manoel de Oliveira. at the end of the movie.
              My friend Lewis Baltz, however would find it "interesting". Let's ask him...


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