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restrictions on fisheye lens settings

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  • Briar
    There was a post recently about using fisheye lenses, and why one should not use them at settings above about f.10. I use a Canon 5d plus 15mm fisheye and find
    Message 1 of 27 , Jan 2, 2010
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      There was a post recently about using fisheye lenses, and why one should not
      use them at settings above about f.10. I use a Canon 5d plus 15mm fisheye
      and find the best settings to be f.8 with focus just off the infinity sign.



      There was a post recently giving the reasons for not using higher settings
      but I deleted it by mistake, and would really like to refer to it. So if
      anyone still has that, could they please re-post it? Thanks in
      anticipation...



      Briar Bentley,

      Agender Northland.

      316 Springfield Road.

      R D 8 Whangarei

      New Zealand

      09-432-2092

      0274-904-553

      briar_bentley@...





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Uri Cogan
      ... This has to do with the very small physical diameter of the aperture opening in a fisheye lens. At very small openings diffraction increases and degrades
      Message 2 of 27 , Jan 2, 2010
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        On 1/2/10 12:30 AM, Briar wrote:


        > There was a post recently about using fisheye lenses, and why one
        > should not
        > use them at settings above about f.10. I use a Canon 5d plus 15mm fisheye
        > and find the best settings to be f.8 with focus just off the infinity
        > sign.
        >
        > There was a post recently giving the reasons for not using higher settings
        > but I deleted it by mistake, and would really like to refer to it. So if
        > anyone still has that, could they please re-post it? Thanks in
        > anticipation...
        >


        This has to do with the very small physical diameter of the aperture
        opening in a fisheye lens. At very small openings diffraction increases
        and degrades sharpness.

        The best way to find the optimum aperture for any lens is to conduct
        some tests.

        --

        Uri Cogan
        http://www.uricogan.com

        *** My Karma Ran Over My Dogma ***



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Erik Krause
        ... Sorry, but diffraction does not depend on focal length, hence there is no big difference in diffraction blur from f/11 on a fisheye and f/11 on a telephoto
        Message 3 of 27 , Jan 2, 2010
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          Am 02.01.2010 18:47, schrieb Uri Cogan:

          > This has to do with the very small physical diameter of the aperture
          > opening in a fisheye lens. At very small openings diffraction increases
          > and degrades sharpness.

          Sorry, but diffraction does not depend on focal length, hence there is
          no big difference in diffraction blur from f/11 on a fisheye and f/11 on
          a telephoto lens. You can calculate the diffraction blur circle for
          different focal length on http://tinyurl.com/DOF-calculator

          > The best way to find the optimum aperture for any lens is to conduct
          > some tests.

          That's certainly true.

          Diffraction is less of a problem for larger sensors, that's why large
          format lenses can be stopped down to f/64 or even f/128. On a compact
          digital you shouldn't stop down beyond f/5.6, on an APS-C sized sensor
          about f/11 and on a full format about f/22

          See also
          http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/technical/diffraction.html
          http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/50-comparison/f-stops.htm

          --
          Erik Krause
        • Abraham Kielcz
          okay then what aperture are owners of Samyang 8mm are using to shoot panos? just want to compare your findings Abraham Kielcz Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. ...
          Message 4 of 27 , Jan 2, 2010
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            okay then what aperture are owners of Samyang 8mm are using to shoot panos?
            just want to compare your findings

            Abraham Kielcz

            Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.

            --- On Sat, 1/2/10, Erik Krause <erik.krause@...> wrote:

            From: Erik Krause <erik.krause@...>
            Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] restrictions on fisheye lens settings
            To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, January 2, 2010, 1:27 PM







             









            Am 02.01.2010 18:47, schrieb Uri Cogan:



            > This has to do with the very small physical diameter of the aperture

            > opening in a fisheye lens. At very small openings diffraction increases

            > and degrades sharpness.



            Sorry, but diffraction does not depend on focal length, hence there is

            no big difference in diffraction blur from f/11 on a fisheye and f/11 on

            a telephoto lens. You can calculate the diffraction blur circle for

            different focal length on http://tinyurl. com/DOF-calculat or



            > The best way to find the optimum aperture for any lens is to conduct

            > some tests.



            That's certainly true.



            Diffraction is less of a problem for larger sensors, that's why large

            format lenses can be stopped down to f/64 or even f/128. On a compact

            digital you shouldn't stop down beyond f/5.6, on an APS-C sized sensor

            about f/11 and on a full format about f/22



            See also

            http://www.bobatkin s.com/photograph y/technical/ diffraction. html

            http://www.kenrockw ell.com/nikon/ 50-comparison/ f-stops.htm



            --

            Erik Krause























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          • Wolfgang Lin
            My suggestion, you can find it yourself. Mount your camera on a tripod, use shutter remote, Manual control, Manual Focus, ISO100, then take shots on different
            Message 5 of 27 , Jan 2, 2010
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              My suggestion, you can find it yourself. Mount your camera on a tripod, use
              shutter remote, Manual control, Manual Focus, ISO100, then take shots on
              different aperture and then go to computer and open with 100% and compare
              and find the best aperture yourself.

              Wolf

              2010/1/3 Abraham Kielcz <roblee007@...>

              >
              >
              > okay then what aperture are owners of Samyang 8mm are using to shoot panos?
              > just want to compare your findings
              >
              > Abraham Kielcz
              >
              > Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
              >
              > --- On Sat, 1/2/10, Erik Krause <erik.krause@... <erik.krause%40gmx.de>>
              > wrote:
              >
              > From: Erik Krause <erik.krause@... <erik.krause%40gmx.de>>
              > Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] restrictions on fisheye lens settings
              > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com <PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com>
              > Date: Saturday, January 2, 2010, 1:27 PM
              >
              >
              >
              > Am 02.01.2010 18:47, schrieb Uri Cogan:
              >
              > > This has to do with the very small physical diameter of the aperture
              >
              > > opening in a fisheye lens. At very small openings diffraction increases
              >
              > > and degrades sharpness.
              >
              > Sorry, but diffraction does not depend on focal length, hence there is
              >
              > no big difference in diffraction blur from f/11 on a fisheye and f/11 on
              >
              > a telephoto lens. You can calculate the diffraction blur circle for
              >
              > different focal length on http://tinyurl. com/DOF-calculat or
              >
              > > The best way to find the optimum aperture for any lens is to conduct
              >
              > > some tests.
              >
              > That's certainly true.
              >
              > Diffraction is less of a problem for larger sensors, that's why large
              >
              > format lenses can be stopped down to f/64 or even f/128. On a compact
              >
              > digital you shouldn't stop down beyond f/5.6, on an APS-C sized sensor
              >
              > about f/11 and on a full format about f/22
              >
              > See also
              >
              > http://www.bobatkin s.com/photograph y/technical/ diffraction. html
              >
              > http://www.kenrockw ell.com/nikon/ 50-comparison/ f-stops.htm
              >
              > --
              >
              > Erik Krause
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Uri Cogan
              ... Ah, thanks for the correction. ... Thanks for the references. Yes, It was not unusual for me to shoot at f:64 with 4 x5 film, etc. (when I still used
              Message 6 of 27 , Jan 2, 2010
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                On 1/2/10 10:27 AM, Erik Krause wrote:


                > Sorry, but diffraction does not depend on focal length, hence there is
                > no big difference in diffraction blur from f/11 on a fisheye and f/11 on
                > a telephoto lens. You can calculate the diffraction blur circle for
                > different focal length on http://tinyurl.com/DOF-calculator
                > <http://tinyurl.com/DOF-calculator>
                >

                Ah, thanks for the correction.


                > Diffraction is less of a problem for larger sensors, that's why large
                > format lenses can be stopped down to f/64 or even f/128. On a compact
                > digital you shouldn't stop down beyond f/5.6, on an APS-C sized sensor
                > about f/11 and on a full format about f/22
                >
                > See also
                > http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/technical/diffraction.html
                > <http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/technical/diffraction.html>
                > http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/50-comparison/f-stops.htm
                > <http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/50-comparison/f-stops.htm>
                >

                Thanks for the references. Yes, It was not unusual for me to shoot at
                f:64 with 4"x5" film, etc. (when I still used film...)

                --

                Uri Cogan
                http://www.uricogan.com

                *** My Karma Ran Over My Dogma ***



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