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What's better for a 1.6x crop factor body, 8mm or 4.5mm?

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  • dburton97128
    For full 360/180 panorama s on a 1.6x crop factor body (Canon 50D), what will work better, a 4.5mm or an 8mm lens? What are the trade offs between these two
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 30, 2009
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      For full 360/180 panorama's on a 1.6x crop factor body (Canon 50D), what will work better, a 4.5mm or an 8mm lens?

      What are the trade offs between these two choices?

      Any opinions?

      Thanks.
    • Roger D. Williams
      On Tue, 01 Dec 2009 14:05:46 +0900, dburton97128 ... The trade offs are pretty clear. The 4.5mm lens will give you a full circular
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2009
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        On Tue, 01 Dec 2009 14:05:46 +0900, dburton97128 <dburton97128@...>
        wrote:

        >
        >
        > For full 360/180 panorama's on a 1.6x crop factor body (Canon 50D), what
        > will work better, a 4.5mm or an 8mm lens?
        >
        > What are the trade offs between these two choices?

        The trade offs are pretty clear. The 4.5mm lens will give you a full
        circular
        image and allow you to make a spherical panorama in three shots or more
        safely four. On the other hand it will "waste" quite a large area of
        your image sensor, effectively reducing the pixel count of your final
        panorama.

        The 8mm lens will require at least four shots, more safely six, and at
        least
        one additional shot, maybe two, for zenith and/or nadir. It will use a
        larger
        area of your image sensor, giving a higher pixel count for the final
        panorama.

        You have to weigh the convenient of fewer shots to make and less stitching
        to do against the loss of pixels. However, if you are shooting for the
        web, the difference may not be

        There will also be differences between the lenses dependent upon the
        choices
        you are considering, but the above considerations will apply whatever the
        lenses.

        Roger W.

        By "safely" I mean with a larger margin for error.

        --
        Business: www.adex-japan.com
        Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
      • prague
        DON T BUY A 4.5MM if you do, you ll feel REALLY bad when you click view fullscreen and your pano isn t sharp enough. I ve heard this a few times already from
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2009
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          DON'T BUY A 4.5MM

          if you do, you'll feel REALLY bad when you click "view fullscreen" and your pano isn't sharp enough. I've heard this a few times already from people who bought the 4.5mm.

          get an 8mm and don't look back. :-)


          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Roger D. Williams" <roger@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Tue, 01 Dec 2009 14:05:46 +0900, dburton97128 <dburton97128@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > For full 360/180 panorama's on a 1.6x crop factor body (Canon 50D), what
          > > will work better, a 4.5mm or an 8mm lens?
          > >
          > > What are the trade offs between these two choices?
          >
          > The trade offs are pretty clear. The 4.5mm lens will give you a full
          > circular
          > image and allow you to make a spherical panorama in three shots or more
          > safely four. On the other hand it will "waste" quite a large area of
          > your image sensor, effectively reducing the pixel count of your final
          > panorama.
          >
          > The 8mm lens will require at least four shots, more safely six, and at
          > least
          > one additional shot, maybe two, for zenith and/or nadir. It will use a
          > larger
          > area of your image sensor, giving a higher pixel count for the final
          > panorama.
          >
          > You have to weigh the convenient of fewer shots to make and less stitching
          > to do against the loss of pixels. However, if you are shooting for the
          > web, the difference may not be
          >
          > There will also be differences between the lenses dependent upon the
          > choices
          > you are considering, but the above considerations will apply whatever the
          > lenses.
          >
          > Roger W.
          >
          > By "safely" I mean with a larger margin for error.
          >
          > --
          > Business: www.adex-japan.com
          > Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
          >
        • dburton97128
          Thanks, this is what I was looking for. David B
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 1, 2009
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            Thanks, this is what I was looking for.

            David B
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