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Nat. Geographic mosaic of huge redwood tree

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  • sdubose99
    Hi all, I wanted to share a couple of links to an amazing, but not technically perfect, mosaic of a 300-foot tall old-growth redwood tree in the Oct 2009
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 25, 2009
      Hi all, I wanted to share a couple of links to an amazing, but not technically perfect, mosaic of a 300-foot tall old-growth redwood tree in the Oct 2009 National Geographic magazine. This is a centerfold which folds out of the magazine in 5 panels.

      Michael Nichols and a team produced this image
      http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/intelligenttravel/redwood_007.jpg

      Comprised of 84 images, using a cable-hoisted camera rig http://www.cameraturret.com/ controlled remotely by Pocket Wizards. There's no mention of the software used.

      Here's a short video documenting the shoot: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/video/player#/?titleID=nichols-redwoods-gatefold

      Scott
    • michel thoby
      ... Not absolutely sure, but running Exiftool on the redwood007.jpg image seems to show that alignment of 84 images on stacked layers was made with PS-CS4
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 26, 2009
        Le 26 sept. 09 à 07:40, sdubose99 a écrit :

        > Hi all, I wanted to share a couple of links to an amazing, but not
        > technically perfect, mosaic of a 300-foot tall old-growth redwood
        > tree in the Oct 2009 National Geographic magazine. This is a
        > centerfold which folds out of the magazine in 5 panels.
        >
        > Michael Nichols and a team produced this image
        > http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/intelligenttravel/
        > redwood_007.jpg
        >
        > Comprised of 84 images, using a cable-hoisted camera righttp://
        > www.cameraturret.com/ controlled remotely by Pocket Wizards.
        > There's no mention of the software used.
        >
        > Here's a short video documenting the shoot: http://
        > ngm.nationalgeographic.com/video/player#/?titleID=nichols-redwoods-
        > gatefold
        >
        > Scott

        Not absolutely sure, but running Exiftool on the redwood007.jpg image
        seems to show that alignment of 84 images on stacked layers was made
        with PS-CS4 Macintosh before conversion from PSD to a (large) JPEG
        image.
        It may then have been scaled down to the final smaller image with PS-
        CS3 Macintosh before posting on the web.

        Michel

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Paul Fretheim
        Have you seen any of my HDRs from Sequoia National Park I have been doing this summer? I have posted a few here. I will be presenting several of them at
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 26, 2009
          Have you seen any of my HDRs from Sequoia National Park I have been
          doing this summer? I have posted a few here. I will be presenting
          several of them at Albuquerque at the upcoming IVRPA conference. It
          kind of makes me smile to see how hard they made things with an entire
          crew and all that equipment. If you just want to photograph a tree from
          top to bottom, that is any old Giant Sequoia (if there is such a thing)
          and you want to be about at the middle of the tree I would suggest
          finding one growing on the side of slope so you just climb up the hill
          above the tree. The pano below is of the General Grant tree, the 2nd
          largest of the Giant Trees.

          http://inyopro.com/images/grant_tree_in_sunshine.html

          And Circle Meadow in the Giant Forest

          http://inyopro.com/images/giant_forest_meadow.html

          In his book on traveling across the United States with his dog Charlie,
          _Travels with Charlie_, John Steinbeck wrote: "No one has ever
          successfully painted or photographed one of the Giant Sequoia trees."

          "Until now," I have been saying all summer.

          My talk is entitled "The Throne Room of the Mountain Gods in Virtual
          Reality" because I will be showing panoramas from the Karakoram
          Mountains of tribal Pakistan from my trip there in the summer of 2007.
          That is the mountain range where K2 is and several other of the world's
          tallest peaks are clustered in the most mountainous place on the
          planet. Our camp on the glacier below K2 was at 15,263 feet or 4,572
          meters. We encountered several make-shift roadblocks manned by Pashtun
          tribesmen with AK-47s on the two day drive through Pashtunistan and the
          Indus Gorge, the deepest canyon in the world on our way to Baltistan,
          the tribal area where the Karakoram pierce the sky. It may be too
          dangerous for an American to travel through the Indus gorge today after
          so many Pashtuns have been killed by U.S. missiles fired from the drone
          aircraft we have sent there. And the Pakistani government plans to
          build a dam in the gorge to be completed in 2016, so it gets more and
          more complicated to bring back VRs of that most amazing geography.

          I am also going to show several panoramas from the groves of Giant
          Sequoias on the west side of the Sierra Nevada mountains and talk
          briefly about High Dynamic Range photography.

          Paul Fretheim
          Inyo Pro
        • moraféria
          Hello, i´m new to pano, and looking to buy a sigma 8mm f3.5 for my canon. Can anyone help me telling me were i can find a safe online store in Europe? I found
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 27, 2009
            Hello,

            i´m new to pano, and looking to buy a sigma 8mm f3.5 for my canon.

            Can anyone help me telling me were i can find a safe online store in Europe?

            I found some places, but it are all out of stock.

            Thank you

            moraféria


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Erik Krause
            ... I personally find the tree portrait photo mosaics of James Balog more convincing: http://www.jamesbalog.com/portfolio/index.html (Flash navigation
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 29, 2009
              sdubose99 wrote:

              > Michael Nichols and a team produced this image
              > http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/intelligenttravel/redwood_007.jpg

              I personally find the "tree portrait" photo mosaics of James Balog more
              convincing:
              http://www.jamesbalog.com/portfolio/index.html (Flash navigation
              unfortunately,
              select second image "Tree", then look for "Stratosphere Giant" f.e.)

              best regards
              --
              Erik Krause
              http://www.erik-krause.de
            • crane@ukonline.co.uk
              ... there nice. I made a couple of a flowering horsechestnut in 40 pics but it didn t look so good ( the shape wasn t right). regards mick ... This mail sent
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 29, 2009
                Quoting Erik Krause <erik.krause@...>:

                > sdubose99 wrote:
                >
                > > Michael Nichols and a team produced this image
                > >
                > http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/intelligenttravel/redwood_007.jpg
                >
                > I personally find the "tree portrait" photo mosaics of James Balog more
                > convincing:
                > http://www.jamesbalog.com/portfolio/index.html (Flash navigation
                > unfortunately,
                > select second image "Tree", then look for "Stratosphere Giant" f.e.)

                there nice. I made a couple of a flowering horsechestnut in 40 pics but it
                didn't look so good ( the shape wasn't right).

                regards

                mick

                ----------------------------------------------
                This mail sent through http://www.ukonline.net
              • Paul Fretheim
                I commented on this last week, but I am not sure if the comment ever appeared. I had to smile when I saw all the work the National Geographic team did to
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 30, 2009
                  I commented on this last week, but I am not sure if the comment ever
                  appeared. I had to smile when I saw all the work the National
                  Geographic team did to photograph a Redwood tree. I have spent the
                  summer photographing the Sequoiadendron Gigantia, the Giant Sequoia
                  trees of the western Sierra Nevada. When doing the production work on
                  the images from my first expedition I realized that I needed to use HDR
                  in the Sequoia groves. So I have been perfecting my HDR techniques and
                  now have it down pretty well, I think.

                  http://inyopro.com/images/muir_cathedral_HDR.html

                  http://inyopro.com/images/circle_meadow.html

                  http://inyopro.com/images/grant_tree_in_sunshine.html


                  There are some strange blurry areas in the Muir Cathedral pano that are
                  caused by the shadows being in different places when succeeding rows
                  were shot. I have learned to stitch the final equirectangular image as
                  a composite of the rows in Photoshop and I can use layers and the
                  erasure tool to keep the sharp focus instead of PTGui blending the
                  different shadow areas into what comes out as blurry areas.

                  Some of the flowers are not sharp in the Circle Meadow panorama because
                  there was a slight breeze and the flowers moved while the bracketed
                  shots were being exposed. Not much you can do about that.

                  John Steinbeck wrote in Travels with Charlie that "No one has ever
                  successfully painted or photographed the Giant Sequoia trees."

                  All summer I have been saying, "Until now!" And I can do it much more
                  easily and simply than the National Geographic team. If I want a shot
                  from midway up a tree I will find one growing on a hillside and then
                  just walk up the hill a way to place my tripod.

                  Please come to my presentation in Albuquerque next Thursday. I will be
                  showing panoramas shot in the Karakoram mountains of Pakistan and also
                  HDR panoramas from the Giant Sequoia groves of California and talking a
                  bit about HDR photography and HDR processing.

                  Paul Fretheim
                • Ron Rack
                  Paul, those are great trees. Thanks for putting a person in there for scale that really helps. FYI- I did see several stitching errors in the muir_cathedral
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 30, 2009
                    Paul, those are great trees. Thanks for putting a person in there for
                    scale that really helps. FYI- I did see several stitching errors in
                    the muir_cathedral image.

                    thanks
                    ronrack



                    On Sep 30, 2009, at 1:11 PM, Paul Fretheim wrote:

                    > I commented on this last week, but I am not sure if the comment ever
                    > appeared. I had to smile when I saw all the work the National
                    > Geographic team did to photograph a Redwood tree. I have spent the
                    > summer photographing the Sequoiadendron Gigantia, the Giant Sequoia
                    > trees of the western Sierra Nevada. When doing the production work on
                    > the images from my first expedition I realized that I needed to use
                    > HDR
                    > in the Sequoia groves. So I have been perfecting my HDR techniques and
                    > now have it down pretty well, I think.
                    >
                    > http://inyopro.com/images/muir_cathedral_HDR.html
                    >
                    > http://inyopro.com/images/circle_meadow.html
                    >
                    > http://inyopro.com/images/grant_tree_in_sunshine.html
                    >
                    > There are some strange blurry areas in the Muir Cathedral pano that
                    > are
                    > caused by the shadows being in different places when succeeding rows
                    > were shot. I have learned to stitch the final equirectangular image as
                    > a composite of the rows in Photoshop and I can use layers and the
                    > erasure tool to keep the sharp focus instead of PTGui blending the
                    > different shadow areas into what comes out as blurry areas.
                    >
                    > Some of the flowers are not sharp in the Circle Meadow panorama
                    > because
                    > there was a slight breeze and the flowers moved while the bracketed
                    > shots were being exposed. Not much you can do about that.
                    >
                    > John Steinbeck wrote in Travels with Charlie that "No one has ever
                    > successfully painted or photographed the Giant Sequoia trees."
                    >
                    > All summer I have been saying, "Until now!" And I can do it much more
                    > easily and simply than the National Geographic team. If I want a shot
                    > from midway up a tree I will find one growing on a hillside and then
                    > just walk up the hill a way to place my tripod.
                    >
                    > Please come to my presentation in Albuquerque next Thursday. I will be
                    > showing panoramas shot in the Karakoram mountains of Pakistan and also
                    > HDR panoramas from the Giant Sequoia groves of California and
                    > talking a
                    > bit about HDR photography and HDR processing.
                    >
                    > Paul Fretheim
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Daniel Reetz
                    ... Beautifully done. One aesthetic comment -- the sky looks a little cyan, to my eyes. Otherwise, great. Regards, DR
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 30, 2009
                      On Wed, Sep 30, 2009 at 12:11 PM, Paul Fretheim <paul@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I commented on this last week, but I am not sure if the comment ever
                      > appeared. I had to smile when I saw all the work the National
                      > Geographic team did to photograph a Redwood tree. I have spent the
                      > summer photographing the Sequoiadendron Gigantia, the Giant Sequoia
                      > trees of the western Sierra Nevada.

                      Beautifully done. One aesthetic comment -- the sky looks a little
                      cyan, to my eyes. Otherwise, great.
                      Regards,
                      DR
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