Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

One shot Panos

Expand Messages
  • jwynne164
    Hi Guys looking for some advice again. I want to move over to some one shot panos, 8 and 16 is excellent for detailed stuff but need one shot to get in and
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Guys looking for some advice again.

      I want to move over to some one shot panos, 8 and 16 is excellent for detailed stuff but need one shot to get in and get out quickly.

      Can anyone suggest the best equipment for the job Pano Pro etc and a good lens to go with it.

      I have two Canon bodies 1D and 5D I usually use a 8mm Fish eye and 14mm Canon lens.

      I also have a RICOH GX-200

      Thank you for any help or advice

      James
    • Keith Martin
      ... One big problem with one-shot panos is the limited maximum resolution you get. A true one-shot solution (ignoring rotating camera solutions) will involve a
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 27, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Sometime around 27/8/09 (at 08:54 +0000) jwynne164 said:

        >I want to move over to some one shot panos, 8 and 16 is excellent
        >for detailed stuff but need one shot to get in and get out quickly.

        One big problem with one-shot panos is the limited maximum resolution
        you get. A true one-shot solution (ignoring rotating camera
        solutions) will involve a dome-style mirror and capturing the whole
        scene in a single frame. You'll need a very high-megapixel camera to
        get something suitable for full-screen work, and because of the
        natural limitations of these devices it'll still be a relatively
        restricted cylinder with sub-optimal optical qualities.

        As for actual products... the 360 One VR 'lens' was sold by Kaidan,
        but Kaidan is no longer selling products at this time. However,
        EyeSee360 (co-developers of the 360 One) has the
        essentially-identical GoPano offered on their site for $599
        (http://store.eyesee360.com/).

        It looks like you'll need to trawl the EyeSee360 forums
        (http://www.eyesee360.com/forum/) to find recommendations for cameras
        and lenses, but from memory: a dSLR with a close-focusing standard
        lens (preferably prime and around the 35-80mm mark) should work well
        with the right bracket (additional $199), but your wide and fisheye
        lenses are too short for effective work. Some point-and-shoot cameras
        (again with the appropriate bracket) are said to work acceptably too.

        I recommend looking at the alternatives before splashing the cash.
        With a good pano head and your existing equipment (5D and Sigma 8mm)
        you should, I think, be able to shoot just three around and turn out
        a perfectly acceptable panorama with the flexibility of an all-but
        complete spherical image (croppable to a cylinder if preferred) and
        at least fair resolution. It'll be better in optical terms too. It
        will require three shots and some stitching (which can be templated
        and more-or-less automated with a precise head) but you'll get better
        results. AND you won't have to figure out how to get out of the shot,
        which should be considered with one-shot solutions.

        It depends in the end on what you're after - at what point speed and
        simplicity trumps quality, or vice versa. My personal bias is pretty
        clear, but please don't take this to mean that a true one-shot
        solution is always the bad choice!

        k
      • panoramicsdk
        ... Why do you believe that shooting oneshot is faster. You still need a good tripod. You need to find the best view when you enter the room. You still need to
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 27, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "jwynne164" <jwynne164@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Guys looking for some advice again.
          >
          > I want to move over to some one shot panos, 8 and 16 is excellent for detailed stuff but need one shot to get in and get out quickly.
          >
          > Can anyone suggest the best equipment for the job Pano Pro etc and a good lens to go with it.
          >
          > I have two Canon bodies 1D and 5D I usually use a 8mm Fish eye and 14mm Canon lens.
          >
          > I also have a RICOH GX-200
          >

          Why do you believe that shooting oneshot is faster.

          You still need a good tripod.

          You need to find the best view when you enter the room.
          You still need to do leveling. Actually that is much more important with the oneshot unless you want to do special levelling of the final pano in PTGui.

          You need to choose the exposure.
          With the oneshot you need to have a wireless remote or use timer and get out of the room.

          The shooting may take only 5-10 second with the oneshot including hiding .

          Taking 4 around with a Sigma 87mm for example takes 60 seconds including mirror up and 3 image bracketing. A simple 4 around is less than 30 sec.

          I would say that the first steps until actual exposure takes 5 minutes per pano wether you use oneshot or a 4 around setup.

          So your actual saving is less than 20% time for the shot.
          Todays stitching is so fast that the difference per pano using a good batch stitching setup is practically none.

          But the difference in quality is huge.

          Hans
        • Keith Martin
          ... Perhaps slightly overstated. :-) Stitching isn t really a zero-time process, and getting to the point of having a reliable batching workflow in the first
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 27, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            >Todays stitching is so fast that the difference per pano using a
            >good batch stitching setup is practically none.

            Perhaps slightly overstated. :-) Stitching isn't really a zero-time
            process, and getting to the point of having a reliable batching
            workflow in the first place can take a little while and requires that
            things are done in a very specific manner. Whereas a one-shot device
            delivers images that bypass that whole multiple image stitch process
            completely.


            >But the difference in quality is huge.

            THIS is the big point as far as I'm concerned. Hans is SO right; the
            quality difference is dramatic.

            It all depends on what's needed. And what the budget is too, I
            suppose. I have a 360One VR mirror lens, but I never use it except
            occasionally as part of teaching. The quality was simply too
            disappointing compared to what I can get with stitched workflows.

            k
          • Roger D. Williams
            On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 17:54:35 +0900, jwynne164 ... Well, James, I don t know if this will be any help, but I used to be keen on the
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 27, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 17:54:35 +0900, jwynne164 <jwynne164@...>
              wrote:

              > Hi Guys looking for some advice again.
              >
              > I want to move over to some one shot panos, 8 and 16 is excellent for
              > detailed stuff but need one shot to get in and get out quickly.
              >
              > Can anyone suggest the best equipment for the job Pano Pro etc and a
              > good lens to go with it.
              >
              > I have two Canon bodies 1D and 5D I usually use a 8mm Fish eye and 14mm
              > Canon lens.
              >
              > I also have a RICOH GX-200

              Well, James, I don't know if this will be any help, but I used to be keen
              on the one-shot panorama, and used a rotary camera with 120 (or 220) film.

              With the Nikon f/2.8 lens I was using, I got vertical coverage of about
              90 degrees, which is fine if you are content with a cylindrical panorama
              that only leaves out the ground and sky (seldom of interest).

              But as I moved to digital and learned how to stitch spherical panoramas
              the quipment has been gathering dust...

              However, like you, I am now considering the Pano Pro to get back to the
              speed and simplicity of the one-shot panorama with quality good enough
              for many web applications (and possibly for video, which is surely the
              coming thing).

              I have been in correspondence with their technical guy (very well informed
              and helpful) and feel that one of the new Olympus neo-F series would be
              a good choice.

              The lens needs to have the right focal length = field-of-view to cover the
              mirror, and for the Olympus 4/3 sensor that works out at about 40mm to
              42mm. On a 1.5x sensor it would be within the normal zoom range. They
              normally talk about zoom lenses but that's only because there are so few
              primes at about the right FL (60mm on a Canon 1.6x sensor).

              I have an excellent (read "prime") 40mm lens, and with the right adaptor
              I could use it with the Olympus body. Of course you need to stop well
              down to get the depth of focus needed to cover the entire mirror image,
              but hopefully you wouldn't need to go up to f/22 where diffraction would
              soften the image.

              Roger W.

              --
              Work: www.adex-japan.com
            • Roger D. Williams
              ... This is not necessarily so, given that you can hide in the nadir blind spot. This is a valid point, though, as I frequently appear in the cylindrical
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 27, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 19:49:26 +0900, panoramicsdk <hans@...> wrote:

                > With the oneshot you need to have a wireless remote or use timer and get
                > out of the room.

                This is not necessarily so, given that you can hide in the nadir blind
                spot.

                This is a valid point, though, as I frequently appear in the cylindrical
                panoramas taken with my Voyageur rotary camera. <g>

                Roger


                --
                Work: www.adex-japan.com
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.