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Once in a Blue Moon

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  • Paul Fretheim
    I m not sure who the photographer was but the page says to credit NASA. Anyway, here is an image at Wired that shows the blue moon during a total eclipse of
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 27, 2009
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      I'm not sure who the photographer was but the page says to credit NASA.
      Anyway, here is an image at Wired that shows the blue moon during a
      total eclipse of the Sun.

      Paul Fretheim

      http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/01/stereosun/
    • Ron Rack
      That s actually a picture of the dark side of the Sun. ron rackphoto.com http://360around.com ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 27, 2009
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        That's actually a picture of the "dark" side of the Sun.

        ron
        rackphoto.com
        http://360around.com


        On Jul 27, 2009, at 10:06 PM, Paul Fretheim wrote:

        > I'm not sure who the photographer was but the page says to credit
        > NASA.
        > Anyway, here is an image at Wired that shows the blue moon during a
        > total eclipse of the Sun.
        >
        > Paul Fretheim
        >
        > http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/01/stereosun/
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Erik Krause
        ... - http://spaceweather.com/glossary/bluemoonstories.html best regards -- Erik Krause http://www.erik-krause.de
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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          Paul Fretheim wrote:

          > Anyway, here is an image at Wired that shows the blue moon during a
          > total eclipse of the Sun.

          -> http://spaceweather.com/glossary/bluemoonstories.html

          best regards
          --
          Erik Krause
          http://www.erik-krause.de
        • Paul Fretheim
          There is no Dark Side of the Sun, although the author of that piece did use that phrase. I assure you the nuclear furnace and resulting ionized ball of gas
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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            There is no "Dark Side of the Sun," although the author of that piece
            did use that phrase. I assure you the nuclear furnace and resulting
            ionized ball of gas is hot on both sides. Those fingers of fire
            emerging from behind the cratered blue sphere are solar flares and that
            picture was taken during a total eclipse of the Sun and the blue,
            cratered surface is the Moon.

            Paul Fretheim
          • Keith Martin
            ... Dang. I was hoping for a volume 2 of the Pink Floyd classic... k
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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              Sometime around 28/7/09 (at 10:44 -0700) Paul Fretheim said:

              >There is no "Dark Side of the Sun,"

              Dang. I was hoping for a 'volume 2' of the Pink Floyd classic...

              k
            • Ron Rack
              Sorry about that, I only know what the article says: First View of the Dark Side of the Sun Well, no, there’s no actual dark side of a luminous ball of
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                Sorry about that, I only know what the article says:

                "First View of the Dark Side of the Sun"
                "Well, no, there�s no actual dark side of a luminous ball of burning
                gas, but there is an effective dark side, as in, the side of the sun
                we can�t see at any given time."

                There is no mention of the moon at all in the article.
                That is not the cratered surface of the moon but the hot swirling
                surface of the sun.
                if you go to this site you can see this blue sun in stereo and in red,
                green and yellow too.

                http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/multimedia/LeftRightImages.html


                ron rack




                On Jul 28, 2009, at 1:44 PM, Paul Fretheim wrote:

                > There is no "Dark Side of the Sun," although the author of that piece
                > did use that phrase. I assure you the nuclear furnace and resulting
                > ionized ball of gas is hot on both sides. Those fingers of fire
                > emerging from behind the cratered blue sphere are solar flares and
                > that
                > picture was taken during a total eclipse of the Sun and the blue,
                > cratered surface is the Moon.
                >
                > Paul Fretheim
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Ron Rack
                Since we are on this Blue Moon/Sun topic and due to the recent discussion on 3-d panos. I did further investigating and found some super cool 3-d movies of the
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                  Since we are on this Blue Moon/Sun topic and due to the recent
                  discussion on 3-d panos. I did further investigating and found some
                  super cool 3-d movies of the sun and it's flares. If you have your
                  trusty 3-d glasses you can check it out here:
                  <http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/multimedia/
                  Active171Movie.html>


                  ron rack



                  On Jul 28, 2009, at 1:44 PM, Paul Fretheim wrote:

                  > There is no "Dark Side of the Sun," although the author of that piece
                  > did use that phrase. I assure you the nuclear furnace and resulting
                  > ionized ball of gas is hot on both sides. Those fingers of fire
                  > emerging from behind the cratered blue sphere are solar flares and
                  > that
                  > picture was taken during a total eclipse of the Sun and the blue,
                  > cratered surface is the Moon.
                  >
                  > Paul Fretheim
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Erik Krause
                  ... Very unlikely. During a total eclipse there is no light source to light the moon except the light reflecting from earth. This light is a thousand times
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                    Paul Fretheim wrote:

                    > Those fingers of fire
                    > emerging from behind the cratered blue sphere are solar flares and that
                    > picture was taken during a total eclipse of the Sun and the blue,
                    > cratered surface is the Moon.

                    Very unlikely. During a total eclipse there is no light source to light
                    the moon except the light reflecting from earth. This light is a
                    thousand times darker even than the solar flares. The moon looks simply
                    black during an eclipse. What you see in the image is the sun itself
                    using special filters, most likely an extreme ultraviolet image:
                    http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/images/latest.html

                    There is a technique to look at the far side of the sun without using a
                    spacecraft: http://spaceweather.com/glossary/farside.html

                    BTW.: Noctilucent cloud season isn't over yet. Who is the first to shoot
                    a NLC spherical: http://tinyurl.com/mw242n

                    best regards
                    --
                    Erik Krause
                    http://www.erik-krause.de
                  • AYRTON
                    ... Sorry Paul I couldn t resist :-) How can you ASSURE is the moon ??? best AYRTON ... -- ... http://ayrton360.com | http://vrfolio.com |
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                      On Tue, Jul 28, 2009 at 2:44 PM, Paul Fretheim <paul@...> wrote:

                      > There is no "Dark Side of the Sun," although the author of that piece
                      > did use that phrase. I assure you the nuclear furnace and resulting
                      > ionized ball of gas is hot on both sides. Those fingers of fire
                      > emerging from behind the cratered blue sphere are solar flares and that
                      > picture was taken during a total eclipse of the Sun and the blue,
                      > cratered surface is the Moon.


                      Sorry Paul
                      I couldn't resist :-)

                      How can you ASSURE is the moon ???

                      best
                      AYRTON



                      >
                      >
                      > Paul Fretheim
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > --
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      --
                      ------------
                      | A Y R |
                      | T O N |
                      ------------ + 55 21 9982 6313
                      http://ayrton360.com | http://vrfolio.com | http://ayrton.com
                      follow me :
                      http://twitter.com/ayrton360


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Paul Fretheim
                      On Tue, Jul 28, 2009 at 2:44 PM, Paul Fretheim
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                        On Tue, Jul 28, 2009 at 2:44 PM, Paul Fretheim <paul@...
                        <mailto:paul%40inyopro.com>> wrote:

                        > There is no "Dark Side of the Sun," although the author of that piece
                        > did use that phrase. I assure you the nuclear furnace and resulting
                        > ionized ball of gas is hot on both sides. Those fingers of fire
                        > emerging from behind the cratered blue sphere are solar flares and that
                        > picture was taken during a total eclipse of the Sun and the blue,
                        > cratered surface is the Moon.

                        Sorry Paul
                        I couldn't resist :-)

                        How can you ASSURE is the moon ???

                        best
                        AYRTON


                        We are too far from Mercury for it's shadow to cover the Sun. There are
                        no other candidates but the Moon. Aren't those the familiar craters of
                        the Moon? I expected people to comment on the obvious use of blue
                        filters, but no one mentioned that.

                        I know without a doubt that the Moon looks blue from the Earth during a
                        total eclipse because I witnessed one and one of the most eerie things
                        about it, aside from the monster shadow sweeping at 1000 miles an hour
                        across first the Front Range of the Rockies and then the Great Plains of
                        Eastern Montana toward us was the Moon appearing blue in the reflected
                        light from Earth's oceans. I have never seen that in a photo, but maybe
                        with HDR it could be captured. Other strange things were the automatic
                        yard lights at the widely spaced ranches coming on in the moment of
                        totality as the monster shadow swept over them and the sound of roosters
                        crowing at the onset of the "night." After the moment of totality, the
                        monster shadow could be seen from our vantage point racing eastward into
                        the distance. It's by far the biggest thing I have ever seen moving
                        over the surface of the Earth.

                        Paul Fretheim
                      • Erik Krause
                        ... No, they aren t. As I wrote 3 hours before, this most likely is the sun in extreme ultraviolet light. Go and have a look:
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                          Paul Fretheim wrote:

                          > Aren't those the familiar craters of
                          > the Moon?

                          No, they aren't. As I wrote 3 hours before, this most likely is the sun
                          in extreme ultraviolet light. Go and have a look:
                          http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/images/latest.html

                          best regards
                          --
                          Erik Krause
                          http://www.erik-krause.de
                        • Kathy Wheeler
                          ... The image on wired is the sun. Albeit filtered, it is still the sun in all it s scarey glory. I ve seen video sequences of the sun s magnetic storms in
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                            On 29/07/2009, at 7:46 AM, Paul Fretheim wrote:
                            > Aren't those the familiar craters of
                            > the Moon?

                            The image on wired is the sun. Albeit filtered, it is still the sun
                            in all it's scarey glory. I've seen video sequences of the sun's
                            magnetic storms in which the whole disc of the sun appears green.
                            It's just the filters or colours they chose to use. The power in
                            those storms and solar flares is plain awesomely scarey

                            > I know without a doubt that the Moon looks blue from the Earth
                            > during a
                            > total eclipse because I witnessed one ... the Moon appearing blue
                            > in the reflected
                            > light from Earth's oceans.

                            I have no doubt a visibly "blue moon" is possible. Whether it is
                            reflected light, atmospheric conditions or the spectral response /
                            white balance of the human eye (interesting reading) will most
                            probably depend on lots of influencing factors. Whether it could be
                            captured on film or digitally ... in the context of a full pano it's
                            just too damn small.

                            > After the moment of totality, the
                            > monster shadow could be seen from our vantage point racing eastward
                            > into
                            > the distance. It's by far the biggest thing I have ever seen moving
                            > over the surface of the Earth.

                            I've seen coverage of that from an observatory somewhere in a
                            mountain range. Not sure if it was Hawaii or somewhere in South
                            America ... but it was fascinating. Do you think it moves too fast to
                            capture in a pano?

                            KathyW.
                          • Ron Rack
                            I found what some call the best picture ever taken of a solar eclipse . It is a composite of a lot of images so you can see the sun s corona and detail in the
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 28, 2009
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                              I found what some call "the best picture ever taken of a solar
                              eclipse". It is a composite of a lot of images so you can see the
                              sun's corona and detail in the surface of the moon, sweet!
                              <http://www.zam.fme.vutbr.cz/~druck/Eclipse/Ecl2008m/Tse2008_200_mo1/0-info.htm
                              >

                              ron rack
                              http://360around.com

                              On Jul 28, 2009, at 7:52 PM, Kathy Wheeler wrote:

                              >
                              > On 29/07/2009, at 7:46 AM, Paul Fretheim wrote:
                              > > Aren't those the familiar craters of
                              > > the Moon?
                              >
                              > The image on wired is the sun. Albeit filtered, it is still the sun
                              > in all it's scarey glory. I've seen video sequences of the sun's
                              > magnetic storms in which the whole disc of the sun appears green.
                              > It's just the filters or colours they chose to use. The power in
                              > those storms and solar flares is plain awesomely scarey
                              >
                              > > I know without a doubt that the Moon looks blue from the Earth
                              > > during a
                              > > total eclipse because I witnessed one ... the Moon appearing blue
                              > > in the reflected
                              > > light from Earth's oceans.
                              >
                              > I have no doubt a visibly "blue moon" is possible. Whether it is
                              > reflected light, atmospheric conditions or the spectral response /
                              > white balance of the human eye (interesting reading) will most
                              > probably depend on lots of influencing factors. Whether it could be
                              > captured on film or digitally ... in the context of a full pano it's
                              > just too damn small.
                              >
                              > > After the moment of totality, the
                              > > monster shadow could be seen from our vantage point racing eastward
                              > > into
                              > > the distance. It's by far the biggest thing I have ever seen moving
                              > > over the surface of the Earth.
                              >
                              > I've seen coverage of that from an observatory somewhere in a
                              > mountain range. Not sure if it was Hawaii or somewhere in South
                              > America ... but it was fascinating. Do you think it moves too fast to
                              > capture in a pano?
                              >
                              > KathyW.
                              >
                              >



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Paul Fretheim
                              OK, it s the Sun. I should have looked more closely. But the blue moon during a total eclipse was my point of interest. That is a fantastic image of an
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 29, 2009
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                                OK, it's the Sun. I should have looked more closely. But the blue moon
                                during a total eclipse was my point of interest. That is a fantastic
                                image of an eclipse, but why do you think that the blue color of the
                                reflected light striking the moon which is striking when you are looking
                                at it live does not show up in even this really great photo?

                                Paul

                                >
                                >
                                > I found what some call "the best picture ever taken of a solar
                                > eclipse". It is a composite of a lot of images so you can see the
                                > sun's corona and detail in the surface of the moon, sweet!
                                > <http://www.zam.fme.vutbr.cz/~druck/Eclipse/Ecl2008m/Tse2008_200_mo1/0-info.htm
                                > <http://www.zam.fme.vutbr.cz/%7Edruck/Eclipse/Ecl2008m/Tse2008_200_mo1/0-info.htm>
                                >
                                > >
                              • Kathy Wheeler
                                ... I wonder *if* it s this effect: Blue Moon Stories http://spaceweather.com/glossary/bluemoonstories.html There are other reasons for odd-looking moons,
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 29, 2009
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                                  On 29/07/2009, at 11:25 PM, Paul Fretheim wrote:
                                  > but why do you think that the blue color of the
                                  > reflected light striking the moon which is striking when you are
                                  > looking
                                  > at it live does not show up in even this really great photo?


                                  I wonder *if* it's this effect:

                                  Blue Moon Stories
                                  http://spaceweather.com/glossary/bluemoonstories.html

                                  There are other reasons for odd-looking moons, notes atmospheric
                                  optics expert Les Cowley. "Our eyes have automatic 'white balances'
                                  just like digital cameras. Go outdoors from a cosy cabin lit by an
                                  oil lamp (yellow light) and the moon will appear blue until your eyes
                                  adjust."

                                  I wonder whether your eyes were still in "daylight" mode and although
                                  the moon "appeared" blue, it actually wasn't so wouldn't record
                                  photographically when cameras adjusted (much faster than the eye) for
                                  the white balance change?

                                  Cheers,
                                  KathyW.
                                • Paul Fretheim
                                  ... Maybe that s it. But it was pretty constant for the entire minute and a half, or whatever it was, of totality. Paul
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jul 30, 2009
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                                    > There are other reasons for odd-looking moons, notes atmospheric
                                    > optics expert Les Cowley. "Our eyes have automatic 'white balances'
                                    > just like digital cameras. Go outdoors from a cosy cabin lit by an
                                    > oil lamp (yellow light) and the moon will appear blue until your eyes
                                    > adjust."
                                    >
                                    > I wonder whether your eyes were still in "daylight" mode and although
                                    > the moon "appeared" blue, it actually wasn't so wouldn't record
                                    > photographically when cameras adjusted (much faster than the eye) for
                                    > the white balance change?
                                    >
                                    > Cheers,
                                    > KathyW.

                                    Maybe that's it. But it was pretty constant for the entire minute and
                                    a half, or whatever it was, of totality.

                                    Paul
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