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Will HD change the way we take take panoramas?

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  • Rey Mendoza,Jr.
    I just saw some hotels features 360 videos of their rooms and facilities. Videos, not VR s. Maybe because it s easier to take videos rather than create
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2009
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      I just saw some hotels features 360 videos of their rooms and facilities. Videos, not VR's. Maybe because it's easier to take videos rather than create panoramas.

      With the entry of HD capable cameras, would the workflow change? I mean we can just take HD videos and then capture the frames that we need for the VR, right? As a photographer I cringe at that thought, but if it is true, then we should adapt to what technology will be available to us at a much easier workflow (maybe, I dont know that for now)
    • crane@ukonline.co.uk
      ... When I was at college in the 60 s learning how to make black and white prints our lecturer said. and one day you will be able to go out and take photos
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2009
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        Quoting "Rey Mendoza,Jr." <reymendoza@...>:

        > I just saw some hotels features 360 videos of their rooms and facilities.
        > Videos, not VR's. Maybe because it's easier to take videos rather than create
        > panoramas.
        >
        > With the entry of HD capable cameras, would the workflow change? I mean we
        > can just take HD videos and then capture the frames that we need for the VR,
        > right? As a photographer I cringe at that thought, but if it is true, then we
        > should adapt to what technology will be available to us at a much easier
        > workflow (maybe, I dont know that for now)

        When I was at college in the 60's learning how to make black and white prints
        our lecturer said.
        " and one day you will be able to go out and take photos your camera will radio
        your pictures back to the studio and when you get back your prints will be waiting."

        we thought, "Oh yeah ? fat chance of that happening!"

        regards

        mick



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      • Paul D. DeRocco
        ... Well, the one thing you can t possibly get around is the need to maintain a fixed nodal point, especially in a confined space. Video doesn t free you from
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2009
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          > From: Rey Mendoza,Jr.
          >
          > I just saw some hotels features 360 videos of their rooms and
          > facilities. Videos, not VR's. Maybe because it's easier to take
          > videos rather than create panoramas.
          >
          > With the entry of HD capable cameras, would the workflow change?
          > I mean we can just take HD videos and then capture the frames
          > that we need for the VR, right? As a photographer I cringe at
          > that thought, but if it is true, then we should adapt to what
          > technology will be available to us at a much easier workflow
          > (maybe, I dont know that for now)

          Well, the one thing you can't possibly get around is the need to maintain a
          fixed nodal point, especially in a confined space. Video doesn't free you
          from the need for a tripod and pano head. Furthermore, if you snatch frames
          from a video, you'll find they're likely to be of poorer quality than
          comparable stills, because stills can be taken at a lower shutter speed, and
          thus capture more light with more depth of field. Those are limits of
          physics, not technology.

          --

          Ciao, Paul D. DeRocco
          Paul mailto:pderocco@...
        • Scott Highton
          Couple of quick comments... First, the no-parallax point about which we rotate a camera lens when shooting panoramas should properly be referred to as the
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1, 2009
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            Couple of quick comments...

            First, the no-parallax point about which we rotate a camera lens when
            shooting panoramas should properly be referred to as the "entrance
            pupil", rather than nodal point. The confusion is understandable.
            There are two (front and rear) nodal points within a lens system, and
            one of them is even used for the rotation alignment of a swing lens
            panoramic camera,. But the term "entrance pupil" is what we should be
            using to describe the no-parallax point of a lens for properly
            shooting a sequence of images for stitching together as a panorama.
            (There is still lots of confusion about this, since the term "nodal
            point" was improperly described back at the beginning of QTVR in
            Apple's documentation.)



            Secondly, if you are going to shoot wide angle images for stitching
            with a video camera, it is wise to also align the pan axis of the
            camera/lens with the entrance pupil of that lens. However, the longer
            the focal length of the lens, and/or the greater the distance (of the
            nearest subject) from the lens, the less critical this entrance pupil
            alignment is for stitching. Stitching applications such as PanoTools
            and PTGUI have gotten fairly good at compensating for minor
            misalignments in many instances.

            However, consider that "video VR" does not necessarily require
            stiching, in a number of instances. One example is the use of one-
            shot parabolic mirror optics, such as EyeSee360's GoPano. Every frame
            shot already comprises a complete 360-degree view.



            Furthermore, I have seen traditional video movies used on web sites
            that very much had the look and feel of an interactive VR panorama,
            but were simply a wide angle video recording done on a fluid video
            head tripod. The result looked very much like an auto-panning VR
            panoramic movie. In one instance, the viewer could even click on the
            movie window to drag left or right. The result was that the video
            scrolled forward or backward, essentially increasing the forward speed
            or reversing the pan direction.

            With a setup like this, entrance pupil alignment is irrelevant,
            because there's no stitching involved -- just an old-fashioned video
            stream (that happens to be a slowly panning camera movement).



            Sometimes, it's good to take a step back and look again at what we're
            trying to do. On occasion, one might find that it's better to go with
            a different, existing technology than it is to spend endless hours and
            energies trying to make a proverbial round peg fit into a square
            hole. Figure out what it is that you want (or need) to do -- your
            desired end result -- before choosing the tool(s) that will help you
            best create it.

            Regards,



            Scott Highton
            Author, Virtual Reality Photography
            Web: http://www.vrphotography.com



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