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Construction Project

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  • Alan Ritter
    Our church is in the midst of a major construction project. I had a chance to walk through parts of it today and shot the following pan:
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 1, 2006
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      Our church is in the midst of a major construction project. I had a
      chance to walk through parts of it today and shot the following pan:

      http://www.mtritter.org/FHIP/

      D200, 10.5 mm fisheye, 8 shots, portrait orientation plus zenith and
      nadir shots. Everything except the nadir was shot on a pano bracket of
      my own design/construction.

      Stitching using PTGui, QTVR conversion (see link at the bottom of the
      web page) using Pano2QTVR.

      Yes, I should have done a high-dynamic range set of images but I had
      just a few minutes to take the pan, so was limited in how much I could
      play around. Hopefully, I can get back into the construction zone a bit
      more as work progresses and have more time to spend on future pans.
      Ultimately, I'd like to set up a full VR tour of the new facility.

      ...anyway, an example of what's possible with minimal hand editing (a
      few mask adjustments and a little cleanup of the nadir image area)...

      /s/jar (Alan Ritter, jar@...)
      http://www.mtritter.org
    • Roger D. Williams
      Alan, I m always interested in seeing what other churches are doing. I agree HDR would have helped with the high contrast but on the other hand this early
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2006
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        Alan, I'm always interested in seeing what other churches are doing.
        I agree HDR would have helped with the high contrast but on the
        other hand this early stage of the reconstruction is probably OK
        shown as it is.

        One thing I did find unsettling, though, is that your horizon is
        not level. In other words, as you pan around, the walls lean in
        different directions. It is usually possible to get the horizon
        right when working with PTgui and it is well worth doing. Was
        there a problem with using the horizon leveling function? You do
        need to re-optimize afterwards but PTgui should flag you about
        this.

        Roger W.

        On Mon, 02 Oct 2006 11:39:38 +0900, Alan Ritter <jar@...> wrote:

        > Our church is in the midst of a major construction project. I had a
        > chance to walk through parts of it today and shot the following pan:
        >
        > http://www.mtritter.org/FHIP/
        >
        > D200, 10.5 mm fisheye, 8 shots, portrait orientation plus zenith and
        > nadir shots. Everything except the nadir was shot on a pano bracket of
        > my own design/construction.
        >
        > Stitching using PTGui, QTVR conversion (see link at the bottom of the
        > web page) using Pano2QTVR.
        >
        > Yes, I should have done a high-dynamic range set of images but I had
        > just a few minutes to take the pan, so was limited in how much I could
        > play around. Hopefully, I can get back into the construction zone a bit
        > more as work progresses and have more time to spend on future pans.
        > Ultimately, I'd like to set up a full VR tour of the new facility.
        >
        > ...anyway, an example of what's possible with minimal hand editing (a
        > few mask adjustments and a little cleanup of the nadir image area)...
        >
        > /s/jar (Alan Ritter, jar@...)
        > http://www.mtritter.org


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      • John Houghton
        ... Automatic levelling features will not usually guarantee to accurately level the panorama. Their success depends upon how accurately the panorama head was
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 2, 2006
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          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Roger D. Williams" <roger@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > It is usually possible to get the horizon right when working with
          > PTgui and it is well worth doing. Was there a problem with using
          > the horizon leveling function? You do need to re-optimize
          > afterwards.

          Automatic levelling features will not usually guarantee to accurately
          level the panorama. Their success depends upon how accurately the
          panorama head was levelled. In a subject like this, accurate
          levelling can be performed in no more than a couple of minutes using
          the optimizer by adding some vertical line (t1) control points.
          (Note that you must use the Panorama Tools optimizer, though, as
          PTGui's optimizer doesn't support t1,t2 and tn points). You can also
          level the finished panorama image using exactly the same technique.
          There's no shortage of tutorials for guiding you through these
          processes:

          http://www.dffe.at/pano360/pano-horizont-360_en.html
          http://wiki.panotools.org/Leveling_a_Finished_Panorama
          http://homepage.ntlworld.com/j.houghton/levtut.htm

          John
        • Roger D. Williams
          That s true, John. I have solved difficult ones using that technique. But I m pretty careful leveling my camera/head and often find the simple PTgui
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 2, 2006
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            That's true, John. I have solved difficult ones using that technique.
            But I'm pretty careful leveling my camera/head and often find the
            simple PTgui horizontalisation function is good enough.

            Roger W.

            On Mon, 02 Oct 2006 17:05:59 +0900, John Houghton
            <j.houghton@...> wrote:

            > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Roger D. Williams" <roger@...>
            > wrote:
            >>
            >> It is usually possible to get the horizon right when working with
            >> PTgui and it is well worth doing. Was there a problem with using
            >> the horizon leveling function? You do need to re-optimize
            >> afterwards.
            >
            > Automatic levelling features will not usually guarantee to accurately
            > level the panorama. Their success depends upon how accurately the
            > panorama head was levelled. In a subject like this, accurate
            > levelling can be performed in no more than a couple of minutes using
            > the optimizer by adding some vertical line (t1) control points.
            > (Note that you must use the Panorama Tools optimizer, though, as
            > PTGui's optimizer doesn't support t1,t2 and tn points). You can also
            > level the finished panorama image using exactly the same technique.
            > There's no shortage of tutorials for guiding you through these
            > processes:
            >
            > http://www.dffe.at/pano360/pano-horizont-360_en.html
            > http://wiki.panotools.org/Leveling_a_Finished_Panorama
            > http://homepage.ntlworld.com/j.houghton/levtut.htm
            >
            > John
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >



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