Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

iDome

Expand Messages
  • tom_a_sparks
    I am looking at the iDome (http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html), and wondering if there any smaller versions or inflatable versions ps:
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I am looking at the iDome (http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html), and wondering if there any smaller versions or inflatable versions


      ps: FAQ: Spherical mirror projection
      for hemispherical dome projection http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/miscellaneous/domemirror/faq.html
    • Aldo Hoeben
      ... (http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html ), ... I built one for the IVRPA
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 28, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        > I am looking at the iDome
        (http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html
        <http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html>),
        > and wondering if there any smaller versions or inflatable versions

        I built one for the IVRPA exhibition at Photokina 2008.
        http://photokina08.ivrpa.org/panoblog/last-visitors-dome-theater
        http://photokina08.ivrpa.org/panoblog/aldo-repairs-dome-theatre
        It consists of 3mm thick PVC gores taped together, which gets you an
        'ok-ish' surface, though Paul Bourke will say you really need the
        surfoace to be smoother. The build was relatively straightforward,
        though quite a bit of trial and error was involved. The second time
        round (... see that second link...) was better than the first. I did not
        have enough time to get the 'projection geometry' just right, and due to
        some extreme bad luck I did not have the projector I hoped for with me.

        Are you thinking about a 'permanent' setup, or something temporary?

        'do
      • tom_a_sparks
        ... I am think of a open of about 12cm or up to 26 cm so its portable
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 28, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Aldo Hoeben <aldo@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I am looking at the iDome
          > (http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html
          > <http://www.icinema.unsw.edu.au/projects/infra_dome.html>),
          > > and wondering if there any smaller versions or inflatable versions
          >
          > I built one for the IVRPA exhibition at Photokina 2008.
          > http://photokina08.ivrpa.org/panoblog/last-visitors-dome-theater
          > http://photokina08.ivrpa.org/panoblog/aldo-repairs-dome-theatre
          > It consists of 3mm thick PVC gores taped together, which gets you an
          > 'ok-ish' surface, though Paul Bourke will say you really need the
          > surfoace to be smoother. The build was relatively straightforward,
          > though quite a bit of trial and error was involved. The second time
          > round (... see that second link...) was better than the first. I did not
          > have enough time to get the 'projection geometry' just right, and due to
          > some extreme bad luck I did not have the projector I hoped for with me.
          >
          > Are you thinking about a 'permanent' setup, or something temporary?
          >
          > 'do
          >
          I am think of a open of about 12cm or up to 26 cm
          so its portable
        • ahoeben41
          ... Either you re missing a 0 there, or we re talking *really* small. At the *really* small scale, I wonder if you would need the dome-mirror to project on;
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 29, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            > I am think of a open of about 12cm or up to 26 cm
            > so its portable

            Either you're missing a 0 there, or we're talking *really* small.

            At the *really* small scale, I wonder if you would need the dome-mirror to project on; you could probably just use rear-projection on the dome. You might have some problem finding a projector that focusses on such a small area.

            If you're talking about a 120 - 260cm portable solution, an inflatable may be your best bet. Or if you don't mind scouring the web, for Photokina we briefly tried to get a large satellite dish. Problem with those is that they are not 'deep' enough.

            Take in mind though that for a good immersive effect, the horizon must be projected at eye's height. That would normally be about 160-180 cm off the floor (depending on local demographics). So even a 260cm high dome is going to feel somewhat cramped.
          • tom_a_sparks
            ... I have found this projector Aiptek Pocket Cinema V10 witch may be able to do it ... so do really need the dome to large enough to stand in? I was think of
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 29, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "ahoeben41" <aldo@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > > I am think of a open of about 12cm or up to 26 cm
              > > so its portable
              >
              > Either you're missing a 0 there, or we're talking *really* small.
              >
              > At the *really* small scale, I wonder if you would need the dome-mirror to project on; you could probably just use rear-projection on the dome. You might have some problem finding a projector that focusses on such a small area.
              >
              I have found this projector Aiptek Pocket Cinema V10 witch may be able to do it

              > If you're talking about a 120 - 260cm portable solution, an inflatable may be your best bet. Or if you don't mind scouring the web, for Photokina we briefly tried to get a large satellite dish. Problem with those is that they are not 'deep' enough.
              >
              > Take in mind though that for a good immersive effect, the horizon must be projected at eye's height. That would normally be about 160-180 cm off the floor (depending on local demographics). So even a 260cm high dome is going to feel somewhat cramped.
              >

              so do really need the dome to large enough to stand in?
              I was think of something head size
            • ahoeben41
              ... So you *were* talking about the small scale. You ll get a different effect with such a small sphere, but it could surely work. Because the radius of the
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 30, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                > > > I am think of a open of about 12cm or up to 26 cm
                > > > so its portable
                > >
                > > Either you're missing a 0 there, or we're talking *really* small.
                > >
                > > At the *really* small scale, I wonder if you would need the
                > > dome-mirror to project on; you could probably just use
                > > rear-projection on the dome.
                >
                > so do really need the dome to large enough to stand in?
                > I was think of something head size

                So you *were* talking about the small scale. You'll get a different effect with such a small sphere, but it could surely work. Because the radius of the sphere is a lot smaller, the position in which the perspective 'works' is going to be a lot tighter.

                On the other hand you get an attractive effect when walking past the installation, as the perspective changes with your movement. I have used this effect (on cylindrical surfaces) to attract spectators to the display-window of a gallery with great success.

                You will probably need a projector that emits more light than the Aiptek (ie: 2000 ANSI Lumen or more, especially if the room you're putting your installation in is not completely black). Like I said focus and depth of field might be an issue on a small 'screen', but I have had reasonable success with putting 'closeup'-type screwin filters in front of a projector (eg 1, 2 or 4 diopter). (Note that most projectors don't have filterthreads, you would have to be creative about that).

                Something that is going to annoy you about projectors is that most of them (the affordable ones anyway) don't project straight ahead, but slightly upwards instead (there's basically a shift lens in there). That is going to make the image you want to project from the rear a bit different from a simple 'fisheye'-like image. It may even look better just projecting a rectilinear image, even if that is not quite correct.

                For a rear projection surface, you could experiment with a cast made from a cheap-ish frying wok. Get a real asian one, without a flat bottom. Grease it with some nice clear oil on the outside so it does not 'stick' and see if you can poor an even layer of latex onto it. If that comes off easily, try another one and reenforce that one with an additional layer of liquid epoxy (after the latex has dried). It might just work. Or it could be a catastrophic failure ;-). I did not test any of this... Experiment!
              • panovrx
                ... Mini-dome personal theatres are a nice idea. It is a middle ground between domes and some kinds of HMDs. Luc Courchese uses a sort of wearable doughnut
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 30, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  >
                  > > > > I am think of a open of about 12cm or up to 26 cm
                  > > > > so its portable
                  > > >
                  > > > Either you're missing a 0 there, or we're talking *really* small.

                  Mini-dome "personal" theatres are a nice idea. It is a middle ground between domes and some kinds of HMDs. Luc Courchese uses a sort of wearable doughnut projection concept for some of his panoramic video pieces. See "Living by Numbers"
                  http://www.din.umontreal.ca/courchesne/

                  Peter M
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.