Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

huuuuge panohead :-)

Expand Messages
  • Carl von Einem
    Is that a pinhole camera? ;-)
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Is that a pinhole camera?
      <http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090401.html>
      ;-)
    • Andrei Zdetovetchi
      Nah, I think this is how the 4 Gigabytes of flash memory looks in space due to the lack of pressure and vacuum... ;) Best regards, Andrei Zdetovetchi the
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Nah, I think this is how the 4 Gigabytes of flash memory looks in space due to the lack of pressure and vacuum... ;)

        Best regards,
        Andrei Zdetovetchi

        the panoblogus - http://www.csvd.ro/panoblog/
        flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/zdeto/
        ---





        ________________________________
        From: Carl von Einem <einem@...>
        To: PanoTools NG List <PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, April 2, 2009 1:46:15 AM
        Subject: [PanoToolsNG] huuuuge panohead :-)


        Is that a pinhole camera?
        <http://antwrp. gsfc.nasa. gov/apod/ ap090401. html>
        ;-)

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Fabio Bustamante
        This photo left me thinking... I suppose telescopes may request some considerably long exposures to shoot stars, galaxies, etc. They must need an extremely
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          This photo left me thinking...

          I suppose telescopes may request some considerably long exposures to
          shoot stars, galaxies, etc. They must need an extremely precise
          gyroscope system to stop all rotations and get an absolutely steady
          image. Sometimes we have trouble steading long objectives even with
          tripods... imagine how hard it must be to get a steady shot in the
          telescope scale!


          Carl von Einem wrote:
          > Is that a pinhole camera?
          > <http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090401.html>
          > ;-)
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          >
        • Paul Trippett
          Never thought about that before, ignorance is bliss. I guess its like your camera and tripod is moving at 35,000 miles an hour and your trying to focus on a
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Never thought about that before, ignorance is bliss. I guess its like your
            camera and tripod is moving at 35,000 miles an hour and your trying to focus
            on a pin head a mile away :/

            On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 7:53 PM, Fabio Bustamante <
            contato@...> wrote:

            > This photo left me thinking...
            >
            > I suppose telescopes may request some considerably long exposures to
            > shoot stars, galaxies, etc. They must need an extremely precise
            > gyroscope system to stop all rotations and get an absolutely steady
            > image. Sometimes we have trouble steading long objectives even with
            > tripods... imagine how hard it must be to get a steady shot in the
            > telescope scale!
            >
            >
            > Carl von Einem wrote:
            > > Is that a pinhole camera?
            > > <http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090401.html>
            > > ;-)
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • paul womack
            ... Since the rotation of the earth is known, they either use a fixed clockwork (normally a very precise worm wheel and drive) or are guided . This is done
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 2, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Fabio Bustamante wrote:
              > This photo left me thinking...
              >
              > I suppose telescopes may request some considerably long exposures to
              > shoot stars, galaxies, etc. They must need an extremely precise
              > gyroscope system to stop all rotations and get an absolutely steady
              > image.

              Since the rotation of the earth is known, they either
              use a fixed "clockwork" (normally a very precise worm wheel
              and drive) or are "guided".

              This is done by pointing a guide telescope (on the same mount
              as the "real" telescope) at a nice bright star,
              and using a feedback loop (on the scope drive) to keep the bright
              star fixed.

              This allows long exposures on stars (and other things) which are
              not so bright.

              BugBear
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.