Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

1st post - align 2 photos (not pano) a century apart?

Expand Messages
  • Jeff
    Hello! This may be the wrong forum for this question, I apologize now if so.. I m trying retake historic photos in my neighborhood. I printed out a few and
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 13, 2009
      Hello!

      This may be the wrong forum for this question, I apologize now if so..

      I'm trying retake historic photos in my neighborhood. I printed out a few and went out to try some test shots (nikon d70, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5). I knew it would be hard to sync them up. I first tried just massaging them in photoshop, but the distortion between the photos is greater than scale & rotation. I would guess it's an issue with my lens or my methodology.

      here's a sample of what i've got, school on Russell Ave in 1940:
      http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj48yl6tI/AAAAAAAAJz8/AfdHIEjCa90/s800/school%20-%202156%20russell.jpg
      and last weekend:
      http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj5tYa4uI/AAAAAAAAJ0E/nSEROmpJi0Q/s800/DSC_0009.jpg

      I should probably try to match the lighting better

      I had used huggin in the past, and armed with this tutorial
      http://hugin.sourceforge.net/tutorials/perspective/en.shtml
      I thought could somehow distort one or both of the photos to make them mostly align. I'll state what I did in huggin:
      - imported both photos (rectilinear), and matched the exif data from the new photo, for the old photo also, since I can't know anything about that old photo
      - I assign the old photo as the position anchor
      - I start manually picking some control points that match in both photos, end up with maybe 15
      - optimize for y,p,r,b
      - and stitch exporting the 'remapped images' only

      the generated image is only of the non-anchor'ed (new) photo. it certainly alters it, but still doesn't align.

      i'm in over my head on this, is huggin the right tool? any advise is greatly appreciated, Jeff
    • Bruno Postle
      ... The old photo is taken with a shift lens, to align this with the new photo you need to optimise the vertical shift e parameters. General advice with
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 13, 2009
        On Fri 13-Mar-2009 at 23:36 -0000, Jeff wrote:
        >here's a sample of what i've got, school on Russell Ave in 1940:
        >http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj48yl6tI/AAAAAAAAJz8/AfdHIEjCa90/s800/school%20-%202156%20russell.jpg
        >and last weekend:
        >http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj5tYa4uI/AAAAAAAAJ0E/nSEROmpJi0Q/s800/DSC_0009.jpg

        The old photo is taken with a shift lens, to align this with the new
        photo you need to optimise the vertical shift 'e' parameters.

        General advice with lining up old photos is they are almost always
        cropped, i.e. the optical centre isn't in the middle of the image.
        So it is probably a good idea to optimise the horizontal shift 'd'
        parameter too.

        >- imported both photos (rectilinear), and matched the exif data from the new photo, for the old photo also, since I can't know anything about that old photo
        >- I assign the old photo as the position anchor
        >- I start manually picking some control points that match in both photos, end up with maybe 15
        >- optimize for y,p,r,b
        >- and stitch exporting the 'remapped images' only

        This technique should be fine.

        --
        Bruno
      • paul womack
        ... As a side issue, if there s lots of traffic, you can take multiple shots (from a locked out tripod) and use layers to remove the cars. Like this:
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 24, 2009
          Jeff wrote:
          > Hello!
          >
          > This may be the wrong forum for this question, I apologize now if so..
          >
          > I'm trying retake historic photos in my neighborhood. I printed out a few and went out to try some test shots (nikon d70, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5). I knew it would be hard to sync them up. I first tried just massaging them in photoshop, but the distortion between the photos is greater than scale & rotation. I would guess it's an issue with my lens or my methodology.
          > and last weekend:
          > http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj5tYa4uI/AAAAAAAAJ0E/nSEROmpJi0Q/s800/DSC_0009.jpg


          As a side issue, if there's lots of traffic, you can take multiple
          shots (from a locked out tripod) and use layers to remove the cars.

          Like this:

          http://dsphotographic.com/articles/how-to-remove-tourists-from-your-photos/

          BugBear
        • tksharpless
          Sorry for such a late reply, just noticed your post... You could probably make this kind of adjustment pretty easily with my perspective tool Panini , which
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 4, 2009
            Sorry for such a late reply, just noticed your post...

            You could probably make this kind of adjustment pretty easily with my perspective tool "Panini", which can act like a software view camera. It can load rectilinear images as well as many panoramic formats, and converts them all to spherical for display (stitchers do that, too). It gives you great deal of control over the shape of the displayed image, all in real time with the mouse.

            The current version is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/pvqt/.

            There is an unreleased special edition of an older version, that lets you load a reference image as a fixed overlay with variable transparency. That would make it easier to get a good match. If you are keen to try it, the Windows executable at http:/tksharpless.net; click the "download" link and download panini-dev/panini-dev.exe. But it won't run without the Qt and MinGW dlls. Best to install version 0.62 from sourceforge, then put panini-dev.exe in the same folder. Or it might work with the dlls in the current 0.63 distribution. Or you could wait for version 1.0 (expected fall '09) which will have an overlay image, too.

            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <shinpickle@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello!
            >
            > This may be the wrong forum for this question, I apologize now if so..
            >
            > I'm trying retake historic photos in my neighborhood. I printed out a few and went out to try some test shots (nikon d70, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5). I knew it would be hard to sync them up. I first tried just massaging them in photoshop, but the distortion between the photos is greater than scale & rotation. I would guess it's an issue with my lens or my methodology.
            >
            > here's a sample of what i've got, school on Russell Ave in 1940:
            > http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj48yl6tI/AAAAAAAAJz8/AfdHIEjCa90/s800/school%20-%202156%20russell.jpg
            > and last weekend:
            > http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj5tYa4uI/AAAAAAAAJ0E/nSEROmpJi0Q/s800/DSC_0009.jpg
            >
            > I should probably try to match the lighting better
            >
            > I had used huggin in the past, and armed with this tutorial
            > http://hugin.sourceforge.net/tutorials/perspective/en.shtml
            > I thought could somehow distort one or both of the photos to make them mostly align. I'll state what I did in huggin:
            > - imported both photos (rectilinear), and matched the exif data from the new photo, for the old photo also, since I can't know anything about that old photo
            > - I assign the old photo as the position anchor
            > - I start manually picking some control points that match in both photos, end up with maybe 15
            > - optimize for y,p,r,b
            > - and stitch exporting the 'remapped images' only
            >
            > the generated image is only of the non-anchor'ed (new) photo. it certainly alters it, but still doesn't align.
            >
            > i'm in over my head on this, is huggin the right tool? any advise is greatly appreciated, Jeff
            >
          • shinpickle@gmail.com
            Well as an update, I have tried every config I could think of in huggin, panini, & ps, but i ve had no real success. holy smokes Perspective Control lens are
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 31 9:28 AM
              Well as an update, I have tried every config I could think of in huggin,
              panini, & ps, but i've had no real success.

              holy smokes Perspective Control lens are expensive, probably from all these
              fadsters trying to take miniature looking photos.

              On Fri, Mar 13, 2009 at 6:46 PM, Bruno Postle <bruno@...> wrote:

              > On Fri 13-Mar-2009 at 23:36 -0000, Jeff wrote:
              > >here's a sample of what i've got, school on Russell Ave in 1940:
              > >
              > http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj48yl6tI/AAAAAAAAJz8/AfdHIEjCa90/s800/school%20-%202156%20russell.jpg
              > >and last weekend:
              > >
              > http://lh3.ggpht.com/_g9AmCZUoW08/Sbrj5tYa4uI/AAAAAAAAJ0E/nSEROmpJi0Q/s800/DSC_0009.jpg
              >
              > The old photo is taken with a shift lens, to align this with the new
              > photo you need to optimise the vertical shift 'e' parameters.
              >
              > General advice with lining up old photos is they are almost always
              > cropped, i.e. the optical centre isn't in the middle of the image.
              > So it is probably a good idea to optimise the horizontal shift 'd'
              > parameter too.
              >
              > >- imported both photos (rectilinear), and matched the exif data from the
              > new photo, for the old photo also, since I can't know anything about that
              > old photo
              > >- I assign the old photo as the position anchor
              > >- I start manually picking some control points that match in both photos,
              > end up with maybe 15
              > >- optimize for y,p,r,b
              > >- and stitch exporting the 'remapped images' only
              >
              > This technique should be fine.
              >
              > --
              > Bruno
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Keith Martin
              ... They ve *always* been expensive, sadly. Niche products, high-end market. Ah well... k
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 31 9:57 AM
                Sometime around 31/7/09 (at 11:28 -0500) shinpickle@... said:

                >holy smokes Perspective Control lens are expensive, probably from all these
                >fadsters trying to take miniature looking photos.

                They've *always* been expensive, sadly. Niche products, high-end market.
                Ah well...

                k
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.