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Pixel density

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  • Ingemar Bergmark
    Following the discussion of the 5D Mark II / Nikkor 10.5 combo, I became curious about what the actual resolution of different cameras really were. By actual
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 16, 2008
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      Following the discussion of the 5D Mark II / Nikkor 10.5 combo, I became
      curious about what the actual resolution of different cameras really
      were. By actual resolution I am only talking about the pixel density of
      the sensor.
      I made a list of cameras that are of my interest, and I was surprised
      with what I saw. I hadn't looked at the different cameras in this way
      before, and thought that it might be of interest to some on this list.

      The list below is sorted by the cameras which have the highest pixel
      density first. Which should mean they give the highest resolution when
      used with the same lens (I got these figures from dpreview).

      4.5MP/cm2, Canon EOS 50D (15MP), 4752x3168
      3.3MP/cm2, Nikon D90 (12.3MP), 4288x2848
      2.9MP/cm2, Sony α900 (24.6MP), 6048x4032
      2.8MP/cm2, Nikon D3x (24.5MP), 6048x4032
      2.4MP/cm2, Canon EOS 20D (8MP), 3504x2336
      2.4MP/cm2, Canon EOS 5D Mark II (21MP), 5616x3744
      1.7MP/cm2, Fuji S5 Pro (6.1MP), 4256x2848
      1.5MP/cm2, Canon EOS 5D (12.8MP), 4368x2912
      1.4MP/cm2, Nikon D700 (12.1MP), 4256x2832

      When I switched from the 20D to the 5D I did notice a loss of detail in
      my panoramas, but I didn't really think of it that much since the 5D
      gave me the option to take handheld panoramas. With the list above the
      loss of resolution can be seen in figures. We can also see that the 5D
      Mark II will be capable of the same resolution as the 20D, which
      motivates me to upgrade my 5D to the Mark II.
      Resolution-wise the 50D should be even better still, theoretically. The
      question now is; where is the resolution-limit of the lens?

      / Ingemar
    • Sacha Griffin
      Yes, exactly. The pixel density of the 20d / 5d ii are identical. The 20d image overlays perfectly. My feeling is that since “pocket” cameras can capture
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 16, 2008
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        Yes, exactly. The pixel density of the 20d / 5d ii are identical. The 20d image overlays perfectly.



        My feeling is that since “pocket” cameras can capture an improvement over themselves in resolution at 12MP using tiny built in lenses, a professional lens should far outmatch even the best cameras we use now.



        http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00AUPc

        Here’s a good article. The 20d / 5d ii should be about 75 lp/mm and the 50d at 106 lp/mm



        Everyone frequently talks about hitting the optical limit of a lens, but I have yet to see any evidence posted comparing two images on different sensors showing no improvement.



        Another article. It seems the more I read the less sure I am either way.

        http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00CumD



        It might be a great idea to start testing lenses with a 50d.





        Sacha Griffin

        Southern Digital Solutions LLC

        http://www.southern-digital.com

        http://www.seeit360.net

        404-551-4275







        From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ingemar Bergmark
        Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 4:29 AM
        To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Pixel density



        Following the discussion of the 5D Mark II / Nikkor 10.5 combo, I became
        curious about what the actual resolution of different cameras really
        were. By actual resolution I am only talking about the pixel density of
        the sensor.
        I made a list of cameras that are of my interest, and I was surprised
        with what I saw. I hadn't looked at the different cameras in this way
        before, and thought that it might be of interest to some on this list.

        The list below is sorted by the cameras which have the highest pixel
        density first. Which should mean they give the highest resolution when
        used with the same lens (I got these figures from dpreview).

        4.5MP/cm2, Canon EOS 50D (15MP), 4752x3168
        3.3MP/cm2, Nikon D90 (12.3MP), 4288x2848
        2.9MP/cm2, Sony α900 (24.6MP), 6048x4032
        2.8MP/cm2, Nikon D3x (24.5MP), 6048x4032
        2.4MP/cm2, Canon EOS 20D (8MP), 3504x2336
        2.4MP/cm2, Canon EOS 5D Mark II (21MP), 5616x3744
        1.7MP/cm2, Fuji S5 Pro (6.1MP), 4256x2848
        1.5MP/cm2, Canon EOS 5D (12.8MP), 4368x2912
        1.4MP/cm2, Nikon D700 (12.1MP), 4256x2832

        When I switched from the 20D to the 5D I did notice a loss of detail in
        my panoramas, but I didn't really think of it that much since the 5D
        gave me the option to take handheld panoramas. With the list above the
        loss of resolution can be seen in figures. We can also see that the 5D
        Mark II will be capable of the same resolution as the 20D, which
        motivates me to upgrade my 5D to the Mark II.
        Resolution-wise the 50D should be even better still, theoretically. The
        question now is; where is the resolution-limit of the lens?

        / Ingemar





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Erik Krause
        ... You could have been reading http://wiki.panotools.org/DSLR_spherical_resolution ;-) This page deals with pixels/mm instead of MP/cm², but this can be
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 16, 2008
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          Ingemar Bergmark wrote:
          > Following the discussion of the 5D Mark II / Nikkor 10.5 combo, I became
          > curious about what the actual resolution of different cameras really
          > were. By actual resolution I am only talking about the pixel density of
          > the sensor.

          You could have been reading
          http://wiki.panotools.org/DSLR_spherical_resolution ;-)

          This page deals with pixels/mm instead of MP/cm², but this can be easily
          converted.

          --
          Erik Krause
          http://www.erik-krause.de
        • Keith Martin
          ... This shows why you have to be careful with plain figures. Depending on how you interpret sensor design the Fuji has either a 6.1MP sensor or a 12.1MP
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 16, 2008
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            >1.7MP/cm2, Fuji S5 Pro (6.1MP), 4256x2848

            >1.4MP/cm2, Nikon D700 (12.1MP), 4256x2832

            This shows why you have to be careful with plain figures. Depending
            on how you interpret sensor design the Fuji has either a 6.1MP sensor
            or a 12.1MP sensor.

            In my experience as a user, regardless of DPReview forum geek theory
            (tongue firmly in cheek), it performs perfectly as the latter as long
            as I use RAW processing tools that understand how this unusual sensor
            design works and how it should be handled. Crisp, low-noise,
            4256x2848 (actually 4224x2792 from Bibble) pixel output.

            Statistics, eh? :-)

            k
          • Ingemar Bergmark
            ... Yeah, you re right. I completely forgot about the fact that the Fuji has a SuperCCD. Given this, the pixel density in reality should be around 3.4MP/cm2. /
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 17, 2008
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              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Keith Martin <keith@...> wrote:
              > >1.7MP/cm2, Fuji S5 Pro (6.1MP), 4256x2848
              > >1.4MP/cm2, Nikon D700 (12.1MP), 4256x2832
              >
              > This shows why you have to be careful with plain figures. Depending
              > on how you interpret sensor design the Fuji has either a 6.1MP sensor
              > or a 12.1MP sensor.
              >


              Yeah, you're right. I completely forgot about the fact that the Fuji
              has a SuperCCD. Given this, the pixel density in reality should be
              around 3.4MP/cm2.

              / Ingemar
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