Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

PTS files x 20

Expand Messages
  • Karol Kwiatek
    How to change a text inside PTS file and save it as a new file? I want to change names of input files and output file. Renaming according to this: name_001.jpg
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      How to change a text inside PTS file and save it as a new file?

      I want to change names of input files and output file.
      Renaming according to this: name_001.jpg -> name_002.jpg (and Save as:
      name_002.pts).
      I don't want to do this manually.

      Regards,
      Karol
    • Erik Krause
      ... PTS files are normal text files. You can use shell commands like (windows) findstr etc. to change them. However, windows shell doesn t offer much useful
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Karol Kwiatek wrote:
        > I want to change names of input files and output file.
        > Renaming according to this: name_001.jpg -> name_002.jpg (and Save as:
        > name_002.pts).
        > I don't want to do this manually.

        PTS files are normal text files. You can use shell commands like
        (windows) findstr etc. to change them. However, windows shell doesn't
        offer much useful commands. But you can use sed (stream editor, known
        from unix) to use automatic regular expression replacement:
        http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/sed.htm

        For Mac AppleScript should do it, other scripting languages might work
        as well.

        --
        Erik Krause
        http://www.erik-krause.de
      • Keith Martin
        ... Automator might make it even easier. Me, I d be inclined to try using SuperCard to make something to do this - I ve done it before, and it is by far the
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Sometime around 1/12/08 (at 20:25 +0100) Erik Krause said:

          >For Mac AppleScript should do it, other scripting languages might work
          >as well.

          Automator might make it even easier.

          Me, I'd be inclined to try using SuperCard to make something to do
          this - I've done it before, and it is by far the easiest way if you
          have the software. And there's the cross-platform Runtime Revolution
          for doing this SuperCard sort of thing on Windows and Unix as well.

          k
        • Joost Nieuwenhuijse
          Hi Karol, Alternatively you might try the new PTGui Pro 8.1 beta, released yesterday: http://www.ptgui.com/beta.html There s a new Batch Builder, which
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 1, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Karol,

            Alternatively you might try the new PTGui Pro 8.1 beta, released
            yesterday: http://www.ptgui.com/beta.html

            There's a new Batch Builder, which generates project files for you based
            on a template.

            Joost


            Karol Kwiatek wrote:
            > How to change a text inside PTS file and save it as a new file?
            >
            > I want to change names of input files and output file.
            > Renaming according to this: name_001.jpg -> name_002.jpg (and Save as:
            > name_002.pts).
            > I don't want to do this manually.
            >
            > Regards,
            > Karol
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
          • crane@ukonline.co.uk
            ... I looked at unix services for windows apparently now called the Subsystem for UNIX-based applications (SUA),
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 2, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Quoting Erik Krause <erik.krause@...>:

              > However, windows shell doesn't
              > offer much useful commands. But you can use sed (stream editor, known
              > from unix) to use automatic regular expression replacement:
              > http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/sed.htm

              I looked at unix services for windows apparently now called the Subsystem for
              UNIX-based applications (SUA),
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Windows_Services_for_UNIX
              but it only works on the "pro" versions of windows it seems.
              mick

              ----------------------------------------------
              This mail sent through http://www.ukonline.net
            • Roger Howard
              I particularly dislike scripting on Windows out of the box, so one of my first stops when setting up a new Windows machine is to download/install cygwin - it
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 2, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                I particularly dislike scripting on Windows out of the box, so one of my
                first stops when setting up a new Windows machine is to download/install
                cygwin - it gives me a Unix-like shell environment (in my case, bash) with
                all the common GNU utilities I am used to on OSX and Linux.

                I haven't been following this thread, but noticed a mention of Microsoft's
                Unix services - cygwin is an excellent alternative.

                PTS files are easy to parse, but first you need to pick your
                tools/language... that's something personal, as much a matter of style as
                anything. Any basic scripting language can handle parsing text files;
                there are some that are more powerful, or more arcane. There are also many
                additional tools like sed which some prefer as well.

                To my current tastes, I find python quick and easy for this kind of work -
                has all the requisite string processing functions you'd need, in a simple
                and straightforward language that runs everywhere. But as with anything
                mentioned here, you'll need some background in programming/scripting, or a
                willingness to learn. As a power user, learning a common scripting
                language will be one of the best investments in skills you'll ever make.

                -R
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.