Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hemispheric video pano

Expand Messages
  • Dennie Kirtley
    I recently saw a post from a developer who is building a 4-head spherical video camera. I viewed the demo and the beta version looks promising. This gives me
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 23, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I recently saw a post from a developer who is building a 4-head
      spherical video camera. I viewed the demo and the beta version looks
      promising. This gives me pause to ask - with the dawn of DSLRs with
      HD video capability (D90, 50D, 5D Mk2, etc) has anyone considered the
      possibility fisheye video panoramas in some sort of panoramic video
      viewer? Further, if this software/viewer was/is produced, I can
      imagine the possibilities for display, perhaps with a hemispheric
      video projector or a bank of normal projectors 'stitched' with soft
      edges. Any thoughts on this?

      Thomas
    • Jim Watters
      ... There has been some work done in the area of fisheye video panoramas by Helmut Dersch. See Motion Panoramas.
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 23, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Dennie Kirtley wrote:
        > [snip]has anyone considered the possibility fisheye video panoramas in some sort of panoramic video viewer? Further, if this software/viewer was/is produced, I can imagine the possibilities for display, perhaps with a hemispheric video projector or a bank of normal projectors 'stitched' with soft edges. Any thoughts on this?
        >
        > Thomas
        >
        There has been some work done in the area of fisheye video panoramas by
        Helmut Dersch. See Motion Panoramas.
        http://webuser.hs-furtwangen.de/~dersch/mp/MotionPanoramas.html


        --
        Jim Watters

        jwatters @ photocreations . ca
        http://photocreations.ca
      • Mark D. Fink
        ... I think maybe Dennie was looking for an interactive video. These show what can be done when converting from the raw fisheye footage to a rectilinear
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 23, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          >-----Original Message-----
          >From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
          >Behalf Of Jim Watters
          >Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2008 10:22 AM
          >To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Hemispheric video pano
          >
          >Dennie Kirtley wrote:
          >> [snip]has anyone considered the possibility fisheye video panoramas in
          >some sort of panoramic video viewer? Further, if this software/viewer
          >was/is produced, I can imagine the possibilities for display, perhaps with
          >a hemispheric video projector or a bank of normal projectors 'stitched'
          >with soft edges. Any thoughts on this?
          >>
          >> Thomas
          >>
          >There has been some work done in the area of fisheye video panoramas by
          >Helmut Dersch. See Motion Panoramas.
          >http://webuser.hs-furtwangen.de/~dersch/mp/MotionPanoramas.html
          >
          >
          >--
          >Jim Watters

          I think maybe Dennie was looking for an interactive video. These show what
          can be done when converting from the raw fisheye footage to a rectilinear
          output, but not the ability to interactively move around within the video.

          I seem to remember an interactive 360 video taken in New Orleans after the
          hurricane. I found this link -
          <http://risingfromruin.msnbc.com/tour.html?roadzoom13btn3> - but nothing
          shows, at least for me. If I recall, someone from this group very quickly
          produced a better version of this in a new viewer. I can't find that
          reference in Nabble.

          Mark
          www.360cities.net
          www.pinnacle-vr.com
          www.northernlight.net
        • Marco Trezzini
          hi, this might be interesting for display: http://www.jdome.com/the_jdome.asp marco ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 24, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            hi, this might be interesting for display:
            http://www.jdome.com/the_jdome.asp
            marco
            On Oct 23, 2008, at 3:54 PM, Dennie Kirtley wrote:

            > I recently saw a post from a developer who is building a 4-head
            > spherical video camera. I viewed the demo and the beta version looks
            > promising. This gives me pause to ask - with the dawn of DSLRs with
            > HD video capability (D90, 50D, 5D Mk2, etc) has anyone considered the
            > possibility fisheye video panoramas in some sort of panoramic video
            > viewer? Further, if this software/viewer was/is produced, I can
            > imagine the possibilities for display, perhaps with a hemispheric
            > video projector or a bank of normal projectors 'stitched' with soft
            > edges. Any thoughts on this?
            >
            > Thomas
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • panovrx
            ... This is interesting for the idea of rear projecting onto a small hemispherical screen. Fisheye movies could be prewarped, so that the perceived image had
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 24, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Marco Trezzini <3z@...> wrote:
              >
              > hi, this might be interesting for display:
              > http://www.jdome.com/the_jdome.asp

              This is interesting for the idea of rear projecting onto a small
              hemispherical screen. Fisheye movies could be prewarped, so that the
              perceived image had proper perspective. Illumination falloff would be
              an issue. It would be interesting to read how the screen is made.
              Peter Murphy
              http://www.mediavr.com/blog
            • Dennie Kirtley
              Replying to the idea about warped hemispheric projection, the other day I saw a new pano viewer, KRpano. It has the very interesting feature of projecting an
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 24, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Replying to the idea about warped hemispheric projection, the other day I
                saw a new pano viewer, KRpano. It has the very interesting feature of
                projecting an architectural (straight-sided with no bent or warped lines)
                perspective. Really, beautiful and well implemented so you don't have the
                usual warped out rectilinear look. I suppose if this could be implemented
                onto a hi-res hemispheric pano video (I shudder to think of the processing
                that would have to be done) then you could theoretically project onto a
                cylinder, or even, I suppose, a cube, assuming the math rewarping is done
                correctly. This would make staging of the video a bit less daunting.

                I can imagine several intriguing uses of this hemispheric video - political
                rallies, rock concerts, product launches and corporate meeting intros.
                Imagine the power of a hemispheric projection hundreds or even thousands of
                feet across. Mind boggling, though I am not even sure that there is the
                existing technology to create this. What I know is this. What goes in goes
                out. If it's possible to capture a hemispheric image, then it theoretically
                possible to project it. It's really just a question of lumens.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Dennie Kirtley
                For hemispheric video projection, another thought just occured to me. You may have read about the new wide field space camera. It is called LSST - Large
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 24, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  For hemispheric video projection, another thought just occured to me. You
                  may have read about the new wide field space camera. It is called LSST -
                  Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. (a link is here
                  http://www.lsst.org/lsst_home.shtml )

                  Folks, this telescope has the largest mirror ever cast- 8.4 meters, and it
                  has an aperture of F 1.25. That's right - it can just about image the
                  proverbial black cat in a coal mine at midnight - and at a distance of
                  billions of light years. There is a whopper of a camera attached to it with
                  a 3.2 GIGA - NOT MEGA - GIGAPIXEL Imager. It has something on the order of
                  200 4K by 4K CCD's. It snaps a wide field photo of the chosen region of the
                  sky - a swath of the sky equal to the area of seven moon diameters and
                  giving a 3.2 Gig image. It will basically image the whole hemisphere every
                  three nights. After this, it begins again and by comparison finds out which
                  heavenly bodies have moved. There are literally thousands of scientists
                  around the world involved in this effort (and if one of you is a member of
                  this group please feel free to correct any erroneous info I may have put up
                  here for I am a photographer, not a scientist)

                  So this wide field camera is not unlike the GigaPan camera device (itself
                  not unlike a wide field telescopic camera), but with the LSST the camera
                  doesn't have to move to each position to make a photo - it already has an
                  imager in place at that position and all backed by a whopping huge $100
                  million dollar lens! But the principle is the same as panoramic
                  photography.

                  Anyway, back to my thought. The LSST will produce ultra-high res photos and
                  then as layers of movement records accumulate, these snapshots will become
                  movies (or more correctly, motion studies). I think this telescope will do
                  for star motion recording what the Hubble did for stilll photography of the
                  stars - it will revolutionize our understanding of planetary dynamics. And
                  what better way to show it to the public than with a hi-res Imax style
                  hemispheric projection onto plantetarium walls? Seems to me this is a
                  no-brainer. Get the data. Down-res to something manageable and you can
                  project hi-res. At this point we are talking here of Hubble-res video of
                  galactic motion. Can you just imagine? I mean, we can sit here and say
                  this or that objective is what we are after just as they did with the Hubble
                  before it went up. But no one could have imagined the staggering beauty of
                  the images it produced. I think something on that order will happen here
                  with the LSST. And even though I thought it, I am sure this hole has
                  already been covered by big brains with big money and it will doubtless
                  happen.

                  Ciao

                  Dennie


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.