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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Equipment advice

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  • Alan Ritter
    Actually, Hans, there is another effect that *may* be lurking here. The cosine law dictates that as you move off-axis, the direction of the photons is no
    Message 1 of 52 , Aug 7, 2008
      Actually, Hans, there is another effect that *may* be lurking here. The
      "cosine law" dictates that as you move off-axis, the direction of the
      photons is no longer perpendicular to the sensor (be that film or
      digital). I would have to look at the optics and chemistry of film
      versus the optics and physics of a digital sensor but I can easily
      imagine that the cosine falloff in apparent brightness would affect a
      digital sensor more than a frame of film.

      The other issue is that we, as panographers, are much *more* sensitive
      to small differences in brightness among adjacent images, especially for
      what we expect to be uniform areas like the sky (or at least smoothly
      varying areas). If you imagine the stitch line asymmetrically crossing
      two adjacent images, any brightness variation will be very visible in
      the sky or other "smooth" areas. You would be much less likely to
      notice this in a single image, even for fairly significant variations in
      brightness.

      /s/jar (Alan Ritter, jar@...
      http://www.mtritter.org



      Hans Nyberg wrote:

      > There might be a difference between film and digital as the digital
      > sensor might be more
      > sensitive for exposure differences but that has nothing to do with the
      > sensor size.
    • Alan Ritter
      Actually, Hans, there is another effect that *may* be lurking here. The cosine law dictates that as you move off-axis, the direction of the photons is no
      Message 52 of 52 , Aug 7, 2008
        Actually, Hans, there is another effect that *may* be lurking here. The
        "cosine law" dictates that as you move off-axis, the direction of the
        photons is no longer perpendicular to the sensor (be that film or
        digital). I would have to look at the optics and chemistry of film
        versus the optics and physics of a digital sensor but I can easily
        imagine that the cosine falloff in apparent brightness would affect a
        digital sensor more than a frame of film.

        The other issue is that we, as panographers, are much *more* sensitive
        to small differences in brightness among adjacent images, especially for
        what we expect to be uniform areas like the sky (or at least smoothly
        varying areas). If you imagine the stitch line asymmetrically crossing
        two adjacent images, any brightness variation will be very visible in
        the sky or other "smooth" areas. You would be much less likely to
        notice this in a single image, even for fairly significant variations in
        brightness.

        /s/jar (Alan Ritter, jar@...
        http://www.mtritter.org



        Hans Nyberg wrote:

        > There might be a difference between film and digital as the digital
        > sensor might be more
        > sensitive for exposure differences but that has nothing to do with the
        > sensor size.
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