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Re: Struggling with Nadir Shot

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  • Erik Krause
    ... Like that: http://pano.erik-krause.de/gardens/index.htm ? best regards Erik Krause http://www.erik-krause.de
    Message 1 of 21 , Aug 4, 2008
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      On Monday, August 04, 2008 at 11:18, Drew Fulton wrote:

      > Once I get this nadir thing sorted, which I am nearly there thanks to
      > Hans, the next step is taking the whole rig into the tree.

      Like that: http://pano.erik-krause.de/gardens/index.htm ?

      best regards
      Erik Krause
      http://www.erik-krause.de
    • Drew Fulton
      Something like that, except 20-30m/60-100 feet off the ground... Drew
      Message 2 of 21 , Aug 4, 2008
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        Something like that, except 20-30m/60-100 feet off the ground...

        Drew

        On Aug 4, 2008, at 11:55 AM, Erik Krause wrote:

        > On Monday, August 04, 2008 at 11:18, Drew Fulton wrote:
        >
        >> Once I get this nadir thing sorted, which I am nearly there thanks to
        >> Hans, the next step is taking the whole rig into the tree.
        >
        > Like that: http://pano.erik-krause.de/gardens/index.htm ?
        >
        > best regards
        > Erik Krause
        > http://www.erik-krause.de
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > --
        >
        >
        >
      • Erik Krause
        ... Shootin in a tree is very tricky, because there usually is near foreground which causes heavy parallax errors. You could fix a monopod to some branches
        Message 3 of 21 , Aug 4, 2008
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          On Monday, August 04, 2008 at 11:18, Drew Fulton wrote:

          > Hae some
          > ideas on how to make it work but keeping myself out of the pano isn't
          > as easy on the ground. Can't just walk around but have to move all of
          > my ropes as well. Should be quite a challenge and will post here once
          > I get one up, hopefully later this week.

          Shootin in a tree is very tricky, because there usually is near
          foreground which causes heavy parallax errors. You could fix a
          monopod to some branches like I did for the cherries shot. For the
          nadir shot I fixed it to some other branches. Befor I did that I
          carefully measured the distance of the NPP from some marked points
          and tried to put it in the same place after. Perhaps some laser
          pointers would do an even better job.

          Another idea would be you hang the camera on a monopod below you. If
          you add some extra weights you might balance the whole thing such,
          that the NPP hangs exactly below the end of the monopod, which would
          allow for simply rotating it around the center of gravity. If you use
          a fisheye lens and point it slightly down, you probably won't need a
          nadir shot, but then you'll have the Problems with the zenith shot.

          You need a cable release of course. I used a quite long one which
          reached to any positions I'm visible. Camera was set to self timer
          mode of course, allowing me to drop the cable and do something...

          In any case it's a good idea to shoot with very large overlap. This
          increases the chance to find some details you need for retouche.

          best regards
          Erik Krause
          http://www.erik-krause.de
        • Erik Krause
          ... 400m: http://pano.erik-krause.de/verdon/index.htm ;-) Erik Krause http://www.erik-krause.de
          Message 4 of 21 , Aug 4, 2008
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            On Monday, August 04, 2008 at 12:01, Drew Fulton wrote:

            > Something like that, except 20-30m/60-100 feet off the ground...

            400m: http://pano.erik-krause.de/verdon/index.htm ;-)
            Erik Krause
            http://www.erik-krause.de
          • crane@ukonline.co.uk
            ... I m planning making a panorama from inside the basket of a hot air balloon next week. I thought to use 2 monopods. one with the mrotatorCP which is at 30
            Message 5 of 21 , Aug 4, 2008
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              Quoting Drew Fulton <drew@...>:

              > Something like that, except 20-30m/60-100 feet off the ground...

              I'm planning making a panorama from inside the basket of a hot air balloon
              next week.

              I thought to use 2 monopods.
              one with the mrotatorCP which is at 30 degree slant and the other with an arm
              on the end so the camera is looking back with nothing in the way.

              I will stick the pole out of the basket horizontally maybe using a boat
              rollock for support and turn the monopod to take 4-6 photos then put the
              camera on the other monopod and try to get the camera in the same place to
              shoot what will be the nadir.
              Everything needs to be clipped to a harness of course.

              I guess you could do a similar thing using a branch for support.
              and maybe have your ropes on the other side of the trunk of the tree.

              regards


              mick


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            • John Riley
              ... Mark, these fig trees aren t any thing like you are used to in the U.S.! They are way cool and HUGE. They start out as an epiphyte growing on the tree,
              Message 6 of 21 , Aug 4, 2008
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                On Aug 4, 2008, at 1:53 PM, Mark D. Fink wrote:

                > Drew,
                >
                > This sounds like a FANTASTIC trip! Being somewhat literal minded, I
                > got a
                > kick out of your comment that you got "about 5 hours in a giant fig
                > with a
                > troop of Howler Monkeys..." OK, so you meant a fig TREE, but I like my
                > version of it better. (Had no idea figs grew that big - is Nabisco
                > aware of
                > this...)
                >
                >
                > Mark
                > www.pinnacle-vr.com
                > www.nyc.360cities.net
                > www.northernlight.net

                Mark, these fig trees aren't any thing like you are used to in the
                U.S.! They are way cool and HUGE. They start out as an epiphyte
                growing on the tree, which drops vines that grow way down to the
                ground. Near the ground, they encircle the tree and take root. Then
                the vines meld together and eventually totally envelop the tree. It
                grows limbs and leaves and becomes a tree itself, killing the host
                tree inside. It is wild to see these huge vine-tree things, which
                you usually can see through the gaps to the hollow interior.

                There is a pretty amazing one in the area where drew is: <http://
                www.costaricatravelscout.com/the-strangler-fig-tree.html>. The cloud
                forest is so cool and spooky looking. I am jealous of his adventure!

                John


                John Riley
                johnriley@...
                jriley@...




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mark D. Fink
                ... Simply amazing! I liked the reference to the Lord of the Rings. I can just imagine a hobbit climbing up inside one of those. Reminiscent of Mirkwood...
                Message 7 of 21 , Aug 6, 2008
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                  >
                  > Mark, these fig trees aren't any thing like you are used to in the
                  > U.S.! They are way cool and HUGE. They start out as an epiphyte
                  > growing on the tree, which drops vines that grow way down to the
                  > ground. Near the ground, they encircle the tree and take root. Then
                  > the vines meld together and eventually totally envelop the tree. It
                  > grows limbs and leaves and becomes a tree itself, killing the host
                  > tree inside. It is wild to see these huge vine-tree things, which
                  > you usually can see through the gaps to the hollow interior.
                  >
                  > There is a pretty amazing one in the area where drew is: <http://
                  > www.costaricatravelscout.com/the-strangler-fig-tree.html>. The cloud
                  > forest is so cool and spooky looking. I am jealous of his adventure!
                  >
                  > John
                  >
                  Simply amazing! I liked the reference to the Lord of the Rings. I can just
                  imagine a hobbit climbing up inside one of those. Reminiscent of Mirkwood...

                  Mark
                  www.pinnacle-vr.com
                  www.nyc.360cities.net
                  www.northernlight.net
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