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Linear pano stitching know-how anyone?

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  • superpanoramas
    Hi, I usually stitch panoramas in PTGui and I am trying something new (for me at least)... a linear panorama. This is one I took differently from the usual
    Message 1 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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      Hi,

      I usually stitch panoramas in PTGui and I am trying something new
      (for me at least)... a "linear" panorama. This is one I took
      differently from the "usual" rotation method, I was about 15m away
      from the subject (a row of houses) and took a number of shots in a
      parallel plane with the subject, a shot about every 5 meters.

      Question: how do I stitch such an image in PTGui? It is almost like I
      would be able to just overlap the images with a little tweaking in
      Photoshop but I think Panotools/PTGui can do that tweaking for me.

      Obviously I don't have to optimize all of the parameters (the image
      is already flat) but I am not technically inclined enough to
      understand which parameter does exactly what... So what settings
      should I use in PTGui?

      Thanks,

      Robert
    • rogerhoward@rogerroger.org
      ... I think there are two methods... one is to stitch using a very long focal length and don t allow PTGUI to optimize lens parameters (FOV, a, b, c). The
      Message 2 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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        On Sep 5, 2006, at 9:40 AM, superpanoramas wrote:

        > Hi,
        >
        > I usually stitch panoramas in PTGui and I am trying something new
        > (for me at least)... a "linear" panorama. This is one I took
        > differently from the "usual" rotation method, I was about 15m away
        > from the subject (a row of houses) and took a number of shots in a
        > parallel plane with the subject, a shot about every 5 meters.
        >
        > Question: how do I stitch such an image in PTGui? It is almost like I
        > would be able to just overlap the images with a little tweaking in
        > Photoshop but I think Panotools/PTGui can do that tweaking for me.
        >
        > Obviously I don't have to optimize all of the parameters (the image
        > is already flat) but I am not technically inclined enough to
        > understand which parameter does exactly what... So what settings
        > should I use in PTGui?

        I think there are two methods... one is to stitch using a very long
        focal length and don't allow PTGUI to optimize lens parameters (FOV,
        a, b, c). The other is to manually composite in Photoshop, as you
        mention.

        In July I shot such a pano in Florence, along the Arno river... I did
        try PTGUI for this, and while it found a lot of control points it
        took a lot of cleanup and I had a lot of stitching problems. Next, I
        took the layers into a Photoshop file and began to composite them
        manually - ultimately for this kind of subject matter I think this is
        the best way, as it takes a lot of decision making to get such a pano
        to blend right, as there are enormous parallax problems you need to
        overcome with clever placement of masks between layers.

        I'm still working on my first such pano, so I can't say for sure what
        will work best in the end.

        -R
      • Hans Nyberg
        ... I have done several of this kind for clients. I would not use PTGui for it. I do it by hand in Photoshop. Especially if you have some depth in it you have
        Message 3 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "superpanoramas" <panoramas@...> wrote:

          > I usually stitch panoramas in PTGui and I am trying something new
          > (for me at least)... a "linear" panorama. This is one I took
          > differently from the "usual" rotation method, I was about 15m away
          > from the subject (a row of houses) and took a number of shots in a
          > parallel plane with the subject, a shot about every 5 meters.
          >
          > Question: how do I stitch such an image in PTGui? It is almost like I
          > would be able to just overlap the images with a little tweaking in
          > Photoshop but I think Panotools/PTGui can do that tweaking for me.

          I have done several of this kind for clients.
          I would not use PTGui for it.
          I do it by hand in Photoshop. Especially if you have some depth in it you have to choose
          the places where you blend the images carefully. No software can do that.

          This is one I just done
          http://beta.ivrpa.org/node/391

          Hans
          www.panoramas.dk
        • John Houghton
          ... I have only attempted one linear panorama and came to the conclusion that the best way of doing it was in Photoshop. It might be that some preprocessing
          Message 4 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "superpanoramas" <panoramas@...>
            wrote:
            > Question: how do I stitch such an image in PTGui? It is almost like I
            > would be able to just overlap the images with a little tweaking in
            > Photoshop

            I have only attempted one linear panorama and came to the conclusion
            that the best way of doing it was in Photoshop. It might be that some
            preprocessing would be useful - if the camera was tilted upwards for
            each shot, perhaps, as it was in my case. That can be done in PTGui,
            but the main work is very laborious in Photoshop using masks and the
            transform tools. The parallax problems can be bad on the roof, where
            there is appreciable depth. You have to contend with double chimneys!
            My final result was far from perfect:

            http://homepage.ntlworld.com/j.houghton/orthog.jpg

            John
          • Bruno Postle
            ... There is another panotools method that gives better results: http://www.dojoe.net/tutorials/linear-pano/ Basically you use the d & e parameters to simulate
            Message 5 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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              On Tue 05-Sep-2006 at 11:16 -0700, rogerhoward@... wrote:
              >
              > > I usually stitch panoramas in PTGui and I am trying something new
              > > (for me at least)... a "linear" panorama. This is one I took
              > > differently from the "usual" rotation method, I was about 15m away
              > > from the subject (a row of houses) and took a number of shots in a
              > > parallel plane with the subject, a shot about every 5 meters.

              > I think there are two methods... one is to stitch using a very long
              > focal length and don't allow PTGUI to optimize lens parameters (FOV,
              > a, b, c). The other is to manually composite in Photoshop, as you
              > mention.

              There is another panotools method that gives better results:

              http://www.dojoe.net/tutorials/linear-pano/

              Basically you use the d & e parameters to simulate the lateral
              shift, and (optionally) roll, pitch, yaw and fov for any other
              variation.

              Note that you have to correct barrel distortion for each image
              before you start - This technique requires that all your source
              images are exactly rectilinear projection with no distortion.

              --
              Bruno
            • Erik Krause
              ... Use shift parameters (d and e) to align images, not yaw and pitch hence you would have to optimize accordingly. If your images suffer from lens distortion
              Message 6 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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                On Tuesday, September 05, 2006 at 16:40, superpanoramas wrote:

                > Question: how do I stitch such an image in PTGui? It is almost like I
                > would be able to just overlap the images with a little tweaking in
                > Photoshop but I think Panotools/PTGui can do that tweaking for me.
                >
                > Obviously I don't have to optimize all of the parameters (the image
                > is already flat) but I am not technically inclined enough to
                > understand which parameter does exactly what... So what settings
                > should I use in PTGui?

                Use shift parameters (d and e) to align images, not yaw and pitch
                hence you would have to optimize accordingly. If your images suffer
                from lens distortion you will have to correct them prior to
                stitching, since a,b and c lens correction parameters work relative
                to the with d and e shifted center. Hence don't optimize or use a,b
                and c (set to 0.0).

                A tutorial (for hugin, but PTGui should work as well) you find here:
                http://www.dojoe.net/tutorials/linear-pano/

                best regards
                --
                Erik Krause
                Resources, not only for panorama creation:
                http://www.erik-krause.de/
              • Tom Matty
                Try panavue, www.panavue.com , for flat stitching. I ve found this program to be very easy to use and does a great job for these
                Message 7 of 19 , Sep 5, 2006
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                  Try panavue, www.panavue.com <http://www.panavue.com/> , for flat
                  stitching. I've found this program to be very easy to use and does a great
                  job for these sorts of linear stitches.



                  Tom



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Guillaume Fulchiron
                  From: Hans Nyberg ... Not yet, but seems there re guys in Redmond who are working on such software :
                  Message 8 of 19 , Sep 7, 2006
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                    From: "Hans Nyberg" <hans@...>

                    > I have done several of this kind for clients.
                    > I would not use PTGui for it.
                    > I do it by hand in Photoshop. Especially if you have some depth in it you have to choose
                    > the places where you blend the images carefully. No software can do that.

                    Not yet, but seems there're guys in Redmond who are working on such software :
                    http://research.microsoft.com/~cohen/LongThings.pdf
                    Looks promising on the paper.

                    From: "superpanoramas" <panoramas@...>

                    > Question: how do I stitch such an image in PTGui? It is almost like I
                    > would be able to just overlap the images with a little tweaking in
                    > Photoshop but I think Panotools/PTGui can do that tweaking for me.

                    Ptgui can help if your images are not rectilinear ; just set some t1 CPs (vertical lines)
                    on each image or set the horizon manually in the panorama editor window. Then, like other
                    members said, you'll have to stitch by hand in Photoshop.

                    Cheers,

                    Guillaume
                  • superpanoramas
                    Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice and pointers... This being my first attempt to create a linear pano, the one thing I know now is that this is nothing
                    Message 9 of 19 , Sep 8, 2006
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                      Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice and pointers...

                      This being my first attempt to create a linear pano, the one thing I
                      know now is that this is nothing like the push-button simplicity of
                      stitching in PTGui...

                      I first tried the technique with Hugin described in the tutorial some
                      of you referred to, and the result was horrible :-(. The pano (or pre-
                      pano pieces I should say...) consists of 26 images of a long row of
                      houses. On the stitch made in Hugin it was all wavy - not just curved
                      but literally like a wawe going up and down quite a few times. I
                      guess this is due to the small differences in perspective in each
                      picture - depending where autopano set the control points, the next
                      image would go up or down.

                      So that wouldn't work.

                      Next I corrected the perspective in each image one by one in PTGui
                      (the camera was pointed a little bit up, and there was also some lens
                      distortion - mild curving towards the edges).

                      Then I started with the first two images in Photoshop... Well, since
                      I've never really been a power Photoshop user (I do Levels, Color
                      correction and the like, but using masks is something new to me) two
                      hours later I was still fiddling around with images 1 and 2. Gee this
                      is a lot of work...

                      If all goes well, in a few months I will be able to show you the
                      final result... :-(

                      Robert Palinkas
                      http://superpanoramas.com
                    • Michael G
                      LINEAR PANORAMAS. If you are not doing this type of work, Skip this LONG email. Hello group. I am doing accurate Linear Panoramas over large areas of coral
                      Message 10 of 19 , Sep 9, 2006
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                        LINEAR PANORAMAS. If you are not doing this type of work, Skip this LONG email.

                        Hello group. I am doing accurate Linear Panoramas over large areas of coral reefs. This is THE MOST DIFFICULT type of project because:
                        1. Wide Angle lenses are required for proper flash illuination. (long lenses and greater distance to the subject are not feasible due to water column filtration and sedimentation)
                        2. The waves move seafans and gorgonians along with the fish.
                        3. Fish move around.
                        4. There are no straight lines as in buildings.
                        5. The coral reef has z projections all over. (sea fans, ect.)
                        6. There is no floor base line and I am Floating.
                        7. Some of my pictures have the surface ripples and clouds behind them. (changing every second)
                        My greatest success so far has been doing the following:
                        SOURCE PICTURE PREPARATION
                        a. Shoot a wire grid test with the 24mm lens. (in the underwater housing dome)
                        b. establish in Photoshop >Filters >Distort > Lens correction Vignetting correction and Distortion setting. (separately for tilt)
                        c. Make an Action for the above.
                        d. separate pictures taken with any tilt for group correction.

                        PHOTOMERGE
                        In photomerge I manually place and rotate an area of images.
                        First composition is with blending (no layers)
                        Second composition is with layers.

                        PHOTOSHOP CORRECTION
                        I copy in the blended version at the bottom or the layered version.
                        In areas of problem blending I copy, delete, select from different layers. Always moving the layer higher and lower to determine the best area to correct.

                        So far my preliminary test patches are quite good.

                        Here are some things I need to learn that will greatly help.
                        * How to use masks to quickly select areas and apply blends to those masks.
                        Im still to dumb to get the tutorials I have seen using these techniques.
                        * How to blend the water with the surface ripples.
                        * How to use EMBLEND.

                        My Belief: Enblend could prepare pairs or images for manual placement in Photoshop. Greatly helping seam area problems in the water.
                        15 years ago I shot this project on Film to be joined with moviemapping and elevation views (linear panoramas) 15,000 underwater images of this small reef. 250 hours of video. Rather than scan all that film, I am reshooting it with a Canon EOS5D. Much greater resolution, exponentialy more stitching problems.

                        The end result is Not only a flat linear panorama... but a navigation throughout all of the materials. The linear panoramas are only for initial navigation.

                        This List has been very informative.
                        Also Erik Krause spends a lot of time helping so many people. His responses are VERY succint..
                        HOWEVER. Some of the most basic things in PTGUI and HUGIN confuse me.
                        My compositions are warped and all over the place. Im sure I need to turn off one of the corrections or projection parameters..
                        I have tested many different programs including Realviz stitchers.

                        Any help would be greatly appreciated. For Now I am just using Photoshop.

                        Michael Greenberg
                        Miami FL

                        superpanoramas <panoramas@...> wrote: Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice and pointers...

                        This being my first attempt to create a linear pano, the one thing I
                        know now is that this is nothing like the push-button simplicity of
                        stitching in PTGui...

                        I first tried the technique with Hugin described in the tutorial some
                        of you referred to, and the result was horrible :-(. The pano (or pre-
                        pano pieces I should say...) consists of 26 images of a long row of
                        houses. On the stitch made in Hugin it was all wavy - not just curved
                        but literally like a wawe going up and down quite a few times. I
                        guess this is due to the small differences in perspective in each
                        picture - depending where autopano set the control points, the next
                        image would go up or down.

                        So that wouldn't work.

                        Next I corrected the perspective in each image one by one in PTGui
                        (the camera was pointed a little bit up, and there was also some lens
                        distortion - mild curving towards the edges).

                        Then I started with the first two images in Photoshop... Well, since
                        I've never really been a power Photoshop user (I do Levels, Color
                        correction and the like, but using masks is something new to me) two
                        hours later I was still fiddling around with images 1 and 2. Gee this
                        is a lot of work...

                        If all goes well, in a few months I will be able to show you the
                        final result... :-(

                        Robert Palinkas
                        http://superpanoramas.com






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Roger Howard
                        Here s a link to my very first linear pano : http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano Some notes: I did this version with PTGUI
                        Message 11 of 19 , Sep 9, 2006
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                          Here's a link to my very first "linear pano":

                          http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano

                          Some notes:

                          I did this version with PTGUI as a starting point...

                          - I used a very long, arbitrary focal length for the lens - this was
                          shot with a 70-200mm f2.8 L @ 70mm/f8 with 25 shots
                          - I walked along the river (the Arno, in Florence) and positioned
                          myself in front of *each* building section, though in the end not all
                          images got used in the final blend
                          - I had to set a LOT of vertical control points - like one for every
                          three image pairs; otherwise the pano was all over the place; it's
                          still not perfectly level in all spots
                          - I used the PanoTools optimizer for best results
                          - I used PTGUI blender
                          - The exposure isn't great, so I lost almost all detail in the sky;
                          c'est la vie; I'll probably redo that much of it some day
                          - I output to layers, and then manually tweaked the blending quite a
                          bit, though PTGUI blender did a respectable enough job (better than I
                          expected)
                          - The parallax issues are enormous, so it takes a lot of fakery to
                          get the final result even reasonable - I know there is still a lot of
                          work to be done on this one, and I may end up starting from scratch
                          again on my next pass

                          Anyhow, a lot of fun regardless.

                          -R
                        • Mike Johnston
                          Very cool! Thanks for sharing. Mike J. ... From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Roger Howard Sent: Saturday,
                          Message 12 of 19 , Sep 9, 2006
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                            Very cool!
                            Thanks for sharing.
                            Mike J.

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com]On
                            Behalf Of Roger Howard
                            Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 1:44 PM
                            To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Linear pano stitching know-how anyone?

                            Here's a link to my very first "linear pano":

                            http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano
                            <http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano>

                            Some notes:

                            I did this version with PTGUI as a starting point...

                            - I used a very long, arbitrary focal length for the lens - this was
                            shot with a 70-200mm f2.8 L @ 70mm/f8 with 25 shots
                            - I walked along the river (the Arno, in Florence) and positioned
                            myself in front of *each* building section, though in the end not all
                            images got used in the final blend
                            - I had to set a LOT of vertical control points - like one for every
                            three image pairs; otherwise the pano was all over the place; it's
                            still not perfectly level in all spots
                            - I used the PanoTools optimizer for best results
                            - I used PTGUI blender
                            - The exposure isn't great, so I lost almost all detail in the sky;
                            c'est la vie; I'll probably redo that much of it some day
                            - I output to layers, and then manually tweaked the blending quite a
                            bit, though PTGUI blender did a respectable enough job (better than I
                            expected)
                            - The parallax issues are enormous, so it takes a lot of fakery to
                            get the final result even reasonable - I know there is still a lot of
                            work to be done on this one, and I may end up starting from scratch
                            again on my next pass

                            Anyhow, a lot of fun regardless.

                            -R


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • amlindsey2001
                            Check out Gene Rhodes site for a few tips on orthographic projections. http://www.photoprojects.net/ ...
                            Message 13 of 19 , Sep 9, 2006
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                              Check out Gene Rhodes site for a few tips on orthographic projections.


                              http://www.photoprojects.net/





                              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Johnston" <wpajohnson@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > Very cool!
                              > Thanks for sharing.
                              > Mike J.
                              >
                              > -----Original Message-----
                              > From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com]On
                              > Behalf Of Roger Howard
                              > Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 1:44 PM
                              > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                              > Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Linear pano stitching know-how anyone?
                              >
                              > Here's a link to my very first "linear pano":
                              >
                              > http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano
                              >
                              <http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano>
                              >
                              > Some notes:
                              >
                              > I did this version with PTGUI as a starting point...
                              >
                              > - I used a very long, arbitrary focal length for the lens - this was
                              > shot with a 70-200mm f2.8 L @ 70mm/f8 with 25 shots
                              > - I walked along the river (the Arno, in Florence) and positioned
                              > myself in front of *each* building section, though in the end not all
                              > images got used in the final blend
                              > - I had to set a LOT of vertical control points - like one for every
                              > three image pairs; otherwise the pano was all over the place; it's
                              > still not perfectly level in all spots
                              > - I used the PanoTools optimizer for best results
                              > - I used PTGUI blender
                              > - The exposure isn't great, so I lost almost all detail in the sky;
                              > c'est la vie; I'll probably redo that much of it some day
                              > - I output to layers, and then manually tweaked the blending quite a
                              > bit, though PTGUI blender did a respectable enough job (better than I
                              > expected)
                              > - The parallax issues are enormous, so it takes a lot of fakery to
                              > get the final result even reasonable - I know there is still a lot of
                              > work to be done on this one, and I may end up starting from scratch
                              > again on my next pass
                              >
                              > Anyhow, a lot of fun regardless.
                              >
                              > -R
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • Guillaume Fulchiron
                              From: Michael G ... is THE MOST DIFFICULT type of ... Hi Michael, very interesting. It could be helpful if you have any picture to
                              Message 14 of 19 , Sep 9, 2006
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                                From: "Michael G" <japan4miami@...>


                                > LINEAR PANORAMAS. If you are not doing this type of work, Skip this LONG email.
                                >
                                > Hello group. I am doing accurate Linear Panoramas over large areas of coral reefs. This
                                is THE MOST DIFFICULT type of
                                > project because:
                                >

                                Hi Michael,

                                very interesting.
                                It could be helpful if you have any picture to show us.

                                Regards,

                                Guillaume
                              • Guillaume Fulchiron
                                From: Roger Howard ... Hi Roger, good job for a first try ! I use the same pedestrian view shots here : :
                                Message 15 of 19 , Sep 9, 2006
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                                  From: "Roger Howard" <rogerhoward@...>

                                  > Here's a link to my very first "linear pano":

                                  >
                                  > http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano
                                  >

                                  Hi Roger,

                                  good job for a first try !

                                  I use the same pedestrian view shots here : :
                                  http://www.animatif.com/labo/labo.htm


                                  > Some notes:
                                  >
                                  > I did this version with PTGUI as a starting point...
                                  >
                                  > - I had to set a LOT of vertical control points - like one for every
                                  > three image pairs; otherwise the pano was all over the place; it's
                                  > still not perfectly level in all spots
                                  > - I used the PanoTools optimizer for best results
                                  > - I used PTGUI blender

                                  This is why I only used PTGUI to optimize vertical lines on every images and export them
                                  one by one before manualy stitch into Photoshop.
                                  However I'm surprised of the good blend result you've got from PTGUI. I bet you are using
                                  one of those new verions.

                                  > - The exposure isn't great, so I lost almost all detail in the sky;
                                  > c'est la vie; I'll probably redo that much of it some day

                                  Well, sky isn't that important in that kind of picture, it can even be a nightmare if
                                  there are clouds.(see Michael Koller).

                                  > - I output to layers, and then manually tweaked the blending quite a
                                  > bit, though PTGUI blender did a respectable enough job (better than I
                                  > expected)
                                  > - The parallax issues are enormous, so it takes a lot of fakery to
                                  > get the final result even reasonable - I know there is still a lot of
                                  > work to be done on this one, and I may end up starting from scratch
                                  > again on my next pass

                                  Come on, a little more work and you'll probably easily hide stitching errors ;-)
                                  I'm a big fan of these type of pictures so don't hesitate to show some more of your work.

                                  regards,

                                  Guillaume
                                • Flemming V. Larsen
                                  I only see a black square in IE6. In Firefox it works fine. Maybe some typing error in the object tag? Look fine allthough the Zoomify viewer is a bit slow in
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Sep 10, 2006
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                                    I only see a black square in IE6. In Firefox it works fine. Maybe some
                                    typing error in the object tag?

                                    Look fine allthough the Zoomify viewer is a bit slow in updating the pisture
                                    parts - isn't there a better solution to show this kind of picture.

                                    I think I've mentioned this before (long time ago) that the best way to
                                    capture "long shots" is by using a slice-camera technic - like the way the
                                    old Juvision panorama system worked:
                                    It captured the pano with a rotating videocamera (40-60 sec for 360 degree)
                                    and then cut a a narrow slice from the center of each frame and joined the
                                    to the final pano.

                                    The easies way is still to use a videocamera moving slowly along the
                                    subjekt. Today a HDTV videocamera can deliver 1920x1080 frames which is
                                    enough for most webpresentations.
                                    But for better quality and higher reolution it is of course better to use a
                                    digital still camera with a good lens and the take as many shots as close
                                    together - measurring the distance between shots as exactly as possible
                                    and/or especially take care where there is sideroads, driveways and other
                                    features going in the depth to aviod paralax problems.

                                    It would be nice if someone could make a software similar to the Jutvision
                                    capable of dealing with todays higher resolulition. But I also think it
                                    would be rather simple to do the clipping (or better for editing: masking
                                    and layering) of the frames/pictures with a Photoshop action .

                                    some useful links:

                                    http://seamlesscity.com/project.html
                                    http://www.photoprojects.net/index4.html


                                    - Flemming


                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: "Roger Howard"
                                    Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Linear pano stitching know-how anyone?


                                    > Here's a link to my very first "linear pano":
                                    >
                                    > http://gallery.rogerroger.org/zoom/zoom.php?path=20060711florence01pano
                                    >
                                  • Roger Howard
                                    ... I ve not found that error, and this code seemed to work fine in IE6 a while ago, but perhaps broke because of a more recent update. ... Runs quite fast
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Sep 10, 2006
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                                      On Sep 10, 2006, at 4:02 AM, Flemming V. Larsen wrote:

                                      > I only see a black square in IE6. In Firefox it works fine. Maybe some
                                      > typing error in the object tag?

                                      I've not found that error, and this code seemed to work fine in IE6 a
                                      while ago, but perhaps broke because of a more recent update.
                                      >
                                      > Look fine allthough the Zoomify viewer is a bit slow in updating
                                      > the pisture
                                      > parts - isn't there a better solution to show this kind of picture.

                                      Runs quite fast here; if you have any constructive suggestions for a
                                      better viewer I'd love to hear it, otherwise this is a very nice
                                      zoomable viewer, IMHO.

                                      > I think I've mentioned this before (long time ago) that the best
                                      > way to
                                      > capture "long shots" is by using a slice-camera technic - like the
                                      > way the
                                      > old Juvision panorama system worked:
                                      > It captured the pano with a rotating videocamera (40-60 sec for 360
                                      > degree)
                                      > and then cut a a narrow slice from the center of each frame and
                                      > joined the
                                      > to the final pano.

                                      Of course, that's the best way - if you'd like to buy or build me one
                                      I'd love to take it off your hands! Until then, I'm working with what
                                      I've got!

                                      -R
                                    • Daniel M. German
                                      If you are technically inclined, there is a very interesting article in this year s Siggraph (unfortunately I am not connected to the internet now so I can t
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Sep 11, 2006
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                                        If you are technically inclined, there is a very interesting article
                                        in this year's Siggraph (unfortunately I am not connected to the
                                        internet now so I can't provide a link). The title is:

                                        Agarwala, Agarwala, Cohen, Salesin, and Szeliski. Photographing Long
                                        Scenes with Multi-Viewpoint Panoramas.

                                        It provides a lot of insight on the challenges of these types of
                                        panoramas.

                                        In a nutshell, they took photos 1 meter apart with a fisheye. They
                                        noticed that everything not in the main plane is difficult to stitch
                                        so it is better to force it to come from one photo only.

                                        The final problem they discovered was that by the time you end the
                                        pano the sun has changed, so you need to adjust for brightness.




                                        --
                                        Daniel M. German "Trying is the first step
                                        Homer Simpson -> towards failure."
                                        http://turingmachine.org/
                                        http://silvernegative.com/
                                        dmg (at) uvic (dot) ca
                                        replace (at) with @ and (dot) with .
                                      • dquelhas
                                        Hi, the article is here: http://grail.cs.washington.edu/projects/multipano/agarwala_sig06.pdf#search=%22Siggraph%20%22Photographing%20Long%22%22 It was the
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Sep 12, 2006
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                                          Hi, the article is here:
                                          http://grail.cs.washington.edu/projects/multipano/agarwala_sig06.pdf#search=%22Siggraph%20%22Photographing%20Long%22%22

                                          It was the first google result writing in the search box: Siggraph
                                          "Photographing Long".

                                          This article is brilliant. Thanks for sharing.

                                          Dinis

                                          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel M. German" <dmgerman@...>
                                          wrote:
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > If you are technically inclined, there is a very interesting article
                                          > in this year's Siggraph (unfortunately I am not connected to the
                                          > internet now so I can't provide a link). The title is:
                                          >
                                          > Agarwala, Agarwala, Cohen, Salesin, and Szeliski. Photographing Long
                                          > Scenes with Multi-Viewpoint Panoramas.
                                          >
                                          > It provides a lot of insight on the challenges of these types of
                                          > panoramas.
                                          >
                                          > In a nutshell, they took photos 1 meter apart with a fisheye. They
                                          > noticed that everything not in the main plane is difficult to stitch
                                          > so it is better to force it to come from one photo only.
                                          >
                                          > The final problem they discovered was that by the time you end the
                                          > pano the sun has changed, so you need to adjust for brightness.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > --
                                          > Daniel M. German "Trying is the first step
                                          > Homer Simpson -> towards failure."
                                          > http://turingmachine.org/
                                          > http://silvernegative.com/
                                          > dmg (at) uvic (dot) ca
                                          > replace (at) with @ and (dot) with .
                                          >
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