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Telegraph.co.uk action panos

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  • Shawn Steigner
    Don t know Peter Payne but he s got some great action panos on the Telegraph.co.uk website from the London Marathon:
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 14, 2008
      Don't know Peter Payne but he's got some great action panos on the
      Telegraph.co.uk website from the London Marathon:
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/04/14/marathon/nmarathon114.xml

      nice pano-journalism



      Cheers-Shawn Steigner
      www.photosurveyor.com
    • Nelson Mendes
      How is it possible to take this kind of 360 panoramas? How many pictures are in those panos? 4+2? 6+2? Anyway, how do we cope with the action and the
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 16, 2008
        How is it possible to take this kind of 360 panoramas? How many pictures are
        in those panos? 4+2? 6+2? Anyway, how do we cope with the "action" and the
        ghosting of moving "things" while stitching?


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nelson Mendes
        Ok, forget it... the explanation in on the same page. Sorry. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 16, 2008
          Ok, forget it... the explanation in on the same page. Sorry.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Keith Martin
          ... As the site says, the panos were stitched from three 179 degree shots taken with a special head . I m guessing that the camera has a high-res full-frame
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 16, 2008
            Sometime around 16/4/08 (at 17:22 +0100) Nelson Mendes said:

            >How is it possible to take this kind of 360 panoramas? How many pictures are
            >in those panos? 4+2? 6+2? Anyway, how do we cope with the "action" and the
            >ghosting of moving "things" while stitching?

            As the site says, the panos were stitched from three '179 degree'
            shots taken with a 'special head'. I'm guessing that the camera has a
            high-res full-frame sensor of some sort as the results look crisp at
            fairly large sizes. Five seconds to take three shots could be a bit
            slow with such active subjects, but having only three shots to
            compose would mean the possible overlap problem areas are few.

            It isn't clear whether the rotation was automatic or manual, but this
            is pretty simple if you have a good, precise pano head, such as the
            360Precision models, Kaidan's beefier units, or similar. It was
            probably done with a Sigma 8mm or (shaved?) Nikkor 10.5mm.

            If you were to do something like this, rotating the pano head against
            the direction of the marathon traffic would be worth considering,
            especially if shooting more than just 3 around. If you turn with the
            movement you'll be effectively tracking the runners as they go past,
            so if you're unlucky with your timing you could end up with the same
            person appearing in multiple consecutive shots. In this situation it
            would be better to track the pano head rotation against the flow than
            with it.

            One trick when working with more randomly active subjects (where
            movement is not mainly in one direction) is to shoot with more
            overlap than you'd normally go for. I habitually shoot 8 horizontally
            with my 10.5mm lens and S5 Pro rather than the 6 that is considered
            adequate, as that means I have almost 50% overlap between shots. That
            can be a pano-saver when shooting in the middle of a crowd at a rave
            festival. :-)
            The 360Precision Adjuste also helps me in these situations; it is
            extremely fast and precise to use. In fact, if I don't use
            particularly fast cards it lets me turn & shoot, turn & shoot fast
            enough to catch up with the camera's memory buffer.

            And finally - I'm guessing the photographer produced layered stiched
            output and did some decision-making in Photoshop, fixing overlaps
            where one shot has what was wanted and the next didn't. This kind of
            subject is always a challenge - which is half the fun of it!

            k
          • Nelson Mendes
            Keith, Thanks for your insight on this matter. It really puzzled me when I first saw the panos. I get so many issues on this matter that this was almost
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 21, 2008
              Keith, Thanks for your insight on this matter. It really puzzled me when I
              first saw the panos. I get so many issues on this matter that this was
              almost unbelievable. I use an old Agnos TCPShort head and precise is not an
              adjective that would fit it right now (the click stops notches are
              completely worn out and I've to visually align the rotation every time).


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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