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Re: [PanoToolsNG] enfuse - exif required?

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  • Keith Martin
    ... Whether or not this is required, it would be worth considering storing some of the basic info anyway. There s far more than just exposure data to be
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 2, 2008
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      Sometime around 2/4/08 (at 10:33 +0100) paul womack said:

      >I'm putting together some processing scripts,
      >and want to know wether I need to maintain
      >and propagate EXIF information as the images
      >go through stages of manipulation.

      Whether or not this is required, it would be worth considering
      storing some of the basic info anyway. There's far more than just
      exposure data to be considered, and it can still be helpful to be
      able to filter (in Adobe Bridge, for example) for things such as ISO,
      shooting date, camera, lens, etc.

      k
    • Erik Krause
      ... It doesn t need such information. It classifies pixels depending on the well-exposedness, the saturation or the relevant contrast. None of that is recorded
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 2, 2008
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        On Wednesday, April 02, 2008 at 10:33, paul womack wrote:

        > Does enfuse used EXIF information, specifically
        > exposure related (shutter speed, aperture, ISO)
        > to do its work, or does it simply deduce
        > such information from the relative
        > values of corresponding pixels?

        It doesn't need such information. It classifies pixels depending on
        the well-exposedness, the saturation or the relevant contrast. None
        of that is recorded in EXIF data...

        > I'm putting together some processing scripts,
        > and want to know wether I need to maintain
        > and propagate EXIF information as the images
        > go through stages of manipulation.

        You can use exiftool to read, evaluate and copy the EXIF info. Have a
        look at my batch file based enfuse droplets for examples:
        http://www.erik-krause.de/enfuse_droplets.zip

        best regards

        Erik Krause
        http://www.erik-krause.de
      • paul womack
        BTW, as a thankyou to the enfuse developers, here s a photo I made using enfuse, that I think would have been very difficult otherwise:
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 7, 2008
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          BTW, as a "thankyou" to the enfuse developers,
          here's a photo I made using enfuse, that I think
          would have been very difficult otherwise:

          http://galootcentral.com/components/cpgalbums/userpics/10152/saw_teeth.jpg

          Here's the write up (aimed at a non photographic
          list, so denizens here may find it a bit glib)

          http://swingleydev.com/archive/get.php?message_id=178807#message

          BugBear
        • Erik Krause
          ... Nice example! However, in a standard studio environment you would have used crossed polarizers (one in front of the lamp, one on the lens) to control
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 7, 2008
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            On Monday, April 07, 2008 at 9:24, paul womack wrote:

            > BTW, as a "thankyou" to the enfuse developers,
            > here's a photo I made using enfuse, that I think
            > would have been very difficult otherwise:
            >
            > http://galootcentral.com/components/cpgalbums/userpics/10152/saw_teeth.jpg

            Nice example! However, in a standard studio environment you would
            have used crossed polarizers (one in front of the lamp, one on the
            lens) to control reflection on the metal. And diffusors are good for
            general illumination...

            best regards
            Erik Krause
            http://www.erik-krause.de
          • Rik Littlefield
            ... Erik, Crossed polarizers probably would not help with this subject. The difficulty is that all parts of the subject are metal, both light and dark.
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 8, 2008
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              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Erik Krause" <erik.krause@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > On Monday, April 07, 2008 at 9:24, paul womack wrote:
              >
              > > BTW, as a "thankyou" to the enfuse developers,
              > > here's a photo I made using enfuse, that I think
              > > would have been very difficult otherwise:
              > >
              > > [long url deleted]
              >
              > Nice example! However, in a standard studio environment
              > you would have used crossed polarizers (one in front of
              > the lamp, one on the lens) to control reflection
              > on the metal. And diffusors are good for
              > general illumination...

              Erik,

              Crossed polarizers probably would not help with this subject.

              The difficulty is that all parts of the subject are metal, both light
              and dark. Crossed polarizers do cut the bright specular reflections,
              but the whole rest of the blade simply darkens to match. The paper
              background and whatever non-metallic paint or crud happens to be
              lying around gets brighter relative to the blade, but there's no
              change in the contrast ratio between dark metal and bright metal.

              I agree that careful diffusion would work well, but we often forget
              how tricky that can be to set up. I remember being very frustrated,
              40 years ago, when I first tried to get good pictures of a similar
              subject.

              Treating this as an HDR problem strikes me as a creative approach
              well worth considering.

              --Rik
            • paul womack
              ... Dunno about creative; HDR just struck me as an easy get out to murderous subject; I wasn t even careful with the location and positioning of the 4 lamps,
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 8, 2008
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                Rik Littlefield wrote:
                >
                > Treating this as an HDR problem strikes me as a creative approach
                > well worth considering.

                Dunno about creative; HDR just struck me as an easy
                get out to murderous subject; I wasn't even careful
                with the location and positioning of the 4 lamps,
                relying on HDR (enfuse) to just "sort it out"
                which it did.

                BugBear
              • Erik Krause
                ... [...] ... I meant using crossed polarizers to control the direct reflection and do the over all lighting with a diffusor - best with a light tent (could be
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 8, 2008
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                  On Tuesday, April 08, 2008 at 15:40, Rik Littlefield wrote:

                  > Crossed polarizers probably would not help with this subject.

                  [...]

                  > I agree that careful diffusion would work well, but we often forget
                  > how tricky that can be to set up.

                  I meant using crossed polarizers to control the direct reflection and
                  do the over all lighting with a diffusor - best with a light tent
                  (could be a white plastic bag in this case)...

                  best regards
                  Erik Krause
                  http://www.erik-krause.de
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