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Re: [PanoToolsNG] A challenge to Panographers around the world

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  • Carlos Chegado - www.netlojas.biz
    Bruno, Yes, building cubes seems to me a lot easier than other shapes, I go for cubes. My bet is to print on the inside and be really careful with the
    Message 1 of 85 , Sep 1, 2006
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      Bruno,

      Yes, building cubes seems to me a lot easier than other shapes, I go for
      cubes.
      My bet is to print on the inside and be really careful with the
      lightning, like put the light on the sun spot if exists or in the open
      window, etc.

      I will print this on a Seiko Color Painter 100S
      <http://www.seiko-i.com/euro/products/ColorPainter100S/index.html> that
      I own, this is at the moment the best combination between High Res and
      Large Format, one can stick the nose in it and can't see the dots but
      will need big files at least 10000x10000pix.

      I would avoid fabrics and anything that looks cheap, the idea is to
      market this on an Art Gallery, should look exquisite and unique, really
      and art object.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Carlos Chegado

      Olho de Peixe Lda

      ====================================

      Fotografias 360º »» www.carloschegado.com <http://www.carloschegado.com>

      ====================================





      Bruno Postle wrote:
      >
      > On Fri 01-Sep-2006 at 16:24 +0100, Carlos Chegado - www.netlojas.biz
      > wrote:
      >
      > >One way to do this is to build life size cubes and print the inside
      > >panels with the cubic projections that we use to make cubic QTVR files
      > >(although with more resolution) so that a person could walk in and feel
      > >like it was there.
      >
      > >The question is, can this be done?
      >
      > Constructing the cubes is easy, assuming the average visitor has
      > eyes 1.6m above ground, they need to be 3.2m square - Though you are
      > not limited to cubes or even to shapes with 90 degree corners - Most
      > historical panoramas were cylindrical and some of the really big
      > ones were hyperbolic (cooling tower) shaped.
      >
      > Personally I would build the cubes with an external structure, line
      > them internally with the images and light them from within - Getting
      > the lighting right is critical.
      >
      > Alternatively you could print on fabric, stretch between a frame and
      > light from outside - but there is no way to avoid shadow lines at
      > the edges with such a system.
      >
      > You could probably get away with printing at 25ppi, in which case
      > you need cube-faces about 3200x3200 pixels, which corresponds to a
      > 10000x5000 equirectangular - Though the experience would be
      > noticeably better at 3x this resolution.
      >
      > --
      > Bruno
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bruno Postle
      ... Yes, just split the square zenith image into four triangles and stretch them to match the shape of the triangle of your pyramid sides. This isn t exactly
      Message 85 of 85 , Sep 13, 2006
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        On Wed 13-Sep-2006 at 11:05 +0200, Bjørn K Nilssen wrote:

        > I will hopefully be able to have a prototype made soon too. The roof will probably not be
        > flat, but pyramid-like, and there will be an internal structure inside, including a zig-
        > zag structure to hold the roof. I don't know yet if there will be a printed ceiling. Do
        > you think it would be enough to just "perspective correct" the 4 wedge shapes from a
        > single zenith square?

        Yes, just split the square zenith image into four triangles and
        stretch them to match the shape of the triangle of your pyramid
        sides. This isn't exactly correct, but it will be near enough as
        so long as your pyramid is shallow.

        --
        Bruno
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