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Re: [PanoToolsNG] A challenge to Panographers around the world

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  • Fabio Bustamante
    Hi Guys, Its a very interesting idea indeed! But I think we should be very careful with the resolution part. Well, people are meant to stand at the very center
    Message 1 of 85 , Sep 1, 2006
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      Hi Guys,


      Its a very interesting idea indeed! But I think we should be very careful
      with the resolution part.

      Well, people are meant to stand at the very center of the cube, right? so
      considering an average eye heigh of 1.6 meters, this would mean that the
      cubes would have faces of 3.2m x 3.2m, and that the user's eyes would be
      standing at exactely 1.6m from each face. (unless we think about smaller
      cubes where people stay at lower positions, like sitting or so).

      From my 4000x2000 panoramas I can extract ideal cube faces of 1274x1274
      pixels. This means that from a 22000x11000 pixels pano the ideal cube face
      would have around 7000x7000 pixels (please correct me if I'm wrong).

      The problem here seems to be filling a 3.2m x 3.2m with an image. Even using
      this huge resolution pano we would be printing a 7000x7000 pixels image on a
      3.2m x 3.2m area, wich gives us a true resolution of around 5.5 dpi.

      This wouldn't mean anything if we didn't know the distance it would be seen,
      but we do - its 1.6 meters. So the big question is: how does a 5.5 dpi image
      looks from 1.6m away?

      Am I thinking right here or am I making some serious math errors??


      Regards,


      Fabio.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Mark D. Fink" <markdfink@...>
      To: <PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, September 01, 2006 12:38 PM
      Subject: RE: [PanoToolsNG] A challenge to Panographers around the world


      Carlos,

      That's a really interesting idea! I just did a test yesterday with my
      Pinnacle VR pano head using a Canon 24mm lens. It took 50 shots to cover the
      full sphere, but the resulting full size pano would be about 22,000 x 11,000
      pixels. (I can't remember the exact dimensions from last night, but I think
      it was around that level of resolution.) This would certainly be enough
      resolution to print a cube that you could step into.

      Mark
      www.northernlight.net
      www.pinnacle-vr.com


      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of Carlos Chegado - www.netlojas.biz
      > Sent: Friday, September 01, 2006 11:25 AM
      > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [PanoToolsNG] A challenge to Panographers around the world
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > I have a challenge for all of you.
      > Several times was discussed on this list the way to get us off the
      > virtual screen into the real world.
      > One way to do this is to build life size cubes and print the inside
      > panels with the cubic projections that we use to make cubic QTVR files
      > (although with more resolution) so that a person could walk in and feel
      > like it was there.
      >
      > Well, yesterday was talking about this with the owner of an important
      > Art Gallery here in Portugal, and he is interested in making a big show
      > using this concept.
      >
      > He has the space needed and will finance the building of the boxes, I
      > happen to own a Large Format Print Center here in Portugal and I can
      > print the whole thing as big as needed, all together we have the
      > creative drive needed to make this a success.
      >
      > This is not like printing equirectangular images that most people can't
      > figure out what it is, this is about capture some point of view
      > somewhere around the world and displaying it 180x360º elsewhere
      > retaining the same perspective, a truly immersive feeling.
      >
      > The question is, can this be done?
      >
      > I don't know if it will work out, I only promise I will try to make it
      > work.
      >
      > We have to decide how to make this cubes.
      >
      > We have to decide a theme for it.
      >
      > We have to decide some technical aspects like resolution and the file
      > size of the cubes.
      >
      > Can we make this into art objects?
      >
      > Let's discuss this and if more people then me are interested in this
      > please come out and say it.
      >
      >
      > --
      >
      > Os melhores cumprimentos,
      >
      > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      >
      > Carlos Chegado
      >
      > Olho de Peixe Lda
      >
      > Rua Miguel Pais, 42 -- 1º A
      > 2830-356 Barreiro
      > Portugal
      >
      > Tel.: (+351) 210 88 91 96
      > Fax: (+351) 210 88 91 99
      >
      > ====================================
      >
      > Fotografias 360º »» www.carloschegado.com <http://www.carloschegado.com>
      >
      > ====================================
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >





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    • Bruno Postle
      ... Yes, just split the square zenith image into four triangles and stretch them to match the shape of the triangle of your pyramid sides. This isn t exactly
      Message 85 of 85 , Sep 13, 2006
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        On Wed 13-Sep-2006 at 11:05 +0200, Bjørn K Nilssen wrote:

        > I will hopefully be able to have a prototype made soon too. The roof will probably not be
        > flat, but pyramid-like, and there will be an internal structure inside, including a zig-
        > zag structure to hold the roof. I don't know yet if there will be a printed ceiling. Do
        > you think it would be enough to just "perspective correct" the 4 wedge shapes from a
        > single zenith square?

        Yes, just split the square zenith image into four triangles and
        stretch them to match the shape of the triangle of your pyramid
        sides. This isn't exactly correct, but it will be near enough as
        so long as your pyramid is shallow.

        --
        Bruno
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