Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[PanoToolsNG] Re:White Balance in Panoramas

Expand Messages
  • Shawn Steigner
    Instead of using transparency gradients, how about a brush with limited opacity? Its much more controllable than the gradients IMO. Sacha Griffin mentioned
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 28, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Instead of using transparency gradients, how about a brush with limited
      opacity?
      Its much more controllable than the gradients IMO.

      Sacha Griffin mentioned this process-
      "You can create rgb channel masks, using an alternative white balance for
      the highlights.
      It's only a 5 second process and works great."

      Perhaps you can elaborate on this Sacha? It does sound interesting.

      Shawn




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Nelson Mendes" <nmendes@...>
      To: <PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 3:46 PM
      Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Fwd: White Balance in Panoramas


      Shawn, that's what I call "time consuming" task. It's more or less the
      way I'm doing the corrections (I use Photo Filter Adjustment layers in
      CS3 and mask the parts I don't need) but the masks sometimes are hard
      to do without using transparency gradients or the edges will show up
      on some areas where the WB is correct. I was wondering if anyone had a
      different (magic??) approach to this :)

      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Steigner" <owner@...> wrote:
      >
      > I use a color(or level) adjustment layer in Photoshop.
      > Adding a corrective blue layer for the indoor lights.
      > Then using the a mask on this layer to hide where the correction isn't
      > needed.
      > Then I'll do the same for the blue-bleed from outside lighting.
      > This also works if there is some weird flourecent lights too.
      > Sometimes a finished pano as a .PSD file will as many as 5-6 color
      > adjustment layers in tough situations.
      > There may only be a small bit of each adjustment layer revealed
      through its
      > mask though.
      > Here's a screen shot of the layers pallet on a finished touch-up:
      > www.photosurveyor.com/tutorials/layers.jpg
      > I learned this from someone on this forum a long time ago.
      > Wish I could remember who.
      > Thanks to that person is due.
      >
      > Shawn
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.