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Re: Testing Enfuse in high contrast environs...

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  • panovrx
    ... I dont think so with Enfuse -- it is a different kettle of fish entirely from other tone mappers (at least in contrast mode). I think the idea of just
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 29, 2008
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      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Eric O'Brien <ericob@...> wrote:
      >
      > "A bit flat looking." That is rather inevitable in the process of
      > compressing a tonal range, isn't it? ;)

      I dont think so with Enfuse -- it is a different kettle of fish
      entirely from other tone mappers (at least in contrast mode). I think
      the idea of just shooting a wide range of exposures, rendering them
      from Raw in a uniform fashion and feeding them to Enfuse is not
      necessarily the optimal approach. I think 4 or 5 exposures would
      probably be the maximum one would need for almost all scenes. Each of
      these should be processed differently I would think re contrast, color
      and noise control. The shadow exposure for instance should be contrasty
      in the blacks and dark tones and have flat, blownout, highlights.
      Conversely the extreme highlight exposure should have flat midtones and
      shadows -- using selections etc if necessary. Enfuse is like a spatial
      tone separation process rather than a physical scene illumination
      recording and tone mapping process -- at least that is how I think of
      it.

      Peter


      >
      > > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "robert_harshman" <image360@>
      > > wrote:
      > >>
      > >>> http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html
      > >>>
      > >>> Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
      > >>> appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and overall
      > >>> wide range quite admirably, IMHO.
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