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Testing Enfuse in high contrast environs...

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  • listmail@mab3d.com
    Hi All, I ve been silently following the development of Enfuse in our beloved Enblend, and decided to grab a copy and run it on my Mac using the old Kekus
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 27, 2008
      Hi All,

      I've been silently following the development of Enfuse in our beloved
      Enblend, and decided to grab a copy and run it on my Mac using the
      old Kekus Xblend front-end. Fast, drag-n-drop results tempted me to
      push the limits of "fusing" with some panoramas shot in probably the
      most "high contrast" natural lighting I've encountered.

      Below is a link to a few recent *fullscreen* QTVRs shot in the
      abandoned Don Valley Brickworks in Toronto. It took 8 exposures (at 2
      ev steps) to capture the range of filtered sunlight against dark
      grime, and just blending the exposures directly with Enfuse gave me
      great results - no HDRs needed! (Although I made them for my 3D work
      all the same...)

      Check them out here (made with ippei's last PPC Enfuse 3 on OS X, via
      Xblend):

      http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html

      Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
      appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and overall
      wide range quite admirably, IMHO.

      -Mark
    • AYRTON - avi
      Beautifull shots Mark. Congratulations And the way you ve use enfuse it s the same as I m doing. X-blend plus enfuse Nice result ! Cheers AYRTON ... -- A Y R
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 27, 2008
        Beautifull shots Mark.
        Congratulations

        And the way you've use enfuse it's the same as I'm doing.
        X-blend plus enfuse
        Nice result !

        Cheers
        AYRTON


        On 1/28/08, listmail@... <listmail@...> wrote:
        > Hi All,
        >
        > I've been silently following the development of Enfuse in our beloved
        > Enblend, and decided to grab a copy and run it on my Mac using the
        > old Kekus Xblend front-end. Fast, drag-n-drop results tempted me to
        > push the limits of "fusing" with some panoramas shot in probably the
        > most "high contrast" natural lighting I've encountered.
        >
        > Below is a link to a few recent *fullscreen* QTVRs shot in the
        > abandoned Don Valley Brickworks in Toronto. It took 8 exposures (at 2
        > ev steps) to capture the range of filtered sunlight against dark
        > grime, and just blending the exposures directly with Enfuse gave me
        > great results - no HDRs needed! (Although I made them for my 3D work
        > all the same...)
        >
        > Check them out here (made with ippei's last PPC Enfuse 3 on OS X, via
        > Xblend):
        >
        > http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html
        >
        > Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
        > appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and overall
        > wide range quite admirably, IMHO.
        >
        > -Mark
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        --
        A Y R T O N
        (55-21) 9982.6313

        www.rio360.com.br
        www.vrfolio.com
        www.ayrton.com
        rio.360cities.net
      • robert_harshman
        ... Hi Mark, seems this is a very popular photo site in the Toronto area. I ve seen shots of this a couple of times before. Anyway, All of the VRs look just a
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 27, 2008
          > http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html
          >
          > Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
          > appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and overall
          > wide range quite admirably, IMHO.
          >
          > -Mark
          >

          Hi Mark, seems this is a very popular photo site in the Toronto area.
          I've seen shots of this a couple of times before.

          Anyway, All of the VRs look just a bit flat on my screen, especially
          the last one. No true blacks to be found. One of the long time issue
          I've found with tone mappers, and any type of blender is the
          propensity to flatten the dynamic range too much. True blacks add a
          real punch to images. I think your examples could use just a bit more
          punch to make them more dramatic. Contrast can be a good thing.

          Just my 2 cents.

          Regards,

          Robert
        • panovrx
          ... overall ... area. ... more ... yes I agree they are a bit flat looking -- they are very atmospheric but need a little more local and global contrast and
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 27, 2008
            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "robert_harshman" <image360@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > > http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html
            > >
            > > Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
            > > appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and
            overall
            > > wide range quite admirably, IMHO.
            > >
            > > -Mark
            > >
            >
            > Hi Mark, seems this is a very popular photo site in the Toronto
            area.
            > I've seen shots of this a couple of times before.
            >
            > Anyway, All of the VRs look just a bit flat on my screen, especially
            > the last one. No true blacks to be found. One of the long time issue
            > I've found with tone mappers, and any type of blender is the
            > propensity to flatten the dynamic range too much. True blacks add a
            > real punch to images. I think your examples could use just a bit
            more
            > punch to make them more dramatic. Contrast can be a good thing.
            >
            > Just my 2 cents.
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > Robert
            >

            yes I agree they are a bit flat looking -- they are very atmospheric
            but need a little more local and global contrast and sharpening -- I
            would use Filter/Other/Highpass/Fade in Softlight mode and some
            Selective Color saturation adjustment then Curves

            Peter
          • Eric O'Brien
            A bit flat looking. That is rather inevitable in the process of compressing a tonal range, isn t it? ;) As to the other adjustments that Peter suggests...
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 29, 2008
              "A bit flat looking." That is rather inevitable in the process of
              compressing a tonal range, isn't it? ;)

              As to the other adjustments that Peter suggests... you might also try
              opening the final panorama file in Photoshop with "Format:" set to
              Camera Raw. You then have available all the adjustments of Camera
              Raw available. Sharpening, curves, tone adjustments, etc. "Clarity"
              seems similar to the "Filter/Other/Highpass/Fade in Softlight mode"
              gesture.

              eo


              On Jan 27, 2008, at 10:38 PM, panovrx wrote:

              > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "robert_harshman" <image360@...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              >>> http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html
              >>>
              >>> Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
              >>> appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and overall
              >>> wide range quite admirably, IMHO.
              >>>
              >>> -Mark
              >>>
              >>
              >> Hi Mark, seems this is a very popular photo site in the Toronto area.
              >> I've seen shots of this a couple of times before.
              >>
              >> Anyway, All of the VRs look just a bit flat on my screen, especially
              >> the last one. No true blacks to be found. One of the long time issue
              >> I've found with tone mappers, and any type of blender is the
              >> propensity to flatten the dynamic range too much. True blacks add a
              >> real punch to images. I think your examples could use just a bit more
              >> punch to make them more dramatic. Contrast can be a good thing.
              >>
              >> Just my 2 cents.
              >>
              >> Regards,
              >>
              >> Robert
              >>
              >
              > yes I agree they are a bit flat looking -- they are very atmospheric
              > but need a little more local and global contrast and sharpening -- I
              > would use Filter/Other/Highpass/Fade in Softlight mode and some
              > Selective Color saturation adjustment then Curves
              >
              > Peter
              >
            • panovrx
              ... I dont think so with Enfuse -- it is a different kettle of fish entirely from other tone mappers (at least in contrast mode). I think the idea of just
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 29, 2008
                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Eric O'Brien <ericob@...> wrote:
                >
                > "A bit flat looking." That is rather inevitable in the process of
                > compressing a tonal range, isn't it? ;)

                I dont think so with Enfuse -- it is a different kettle of fish
                entirely from other tone mappers (at least in contrast mode). I think
                the idea of just shooting a wide range of exposures, rendering them
                from Raw in a uniform fashion and feeding them to Enfuse is not
                necessarily the optimal approach. I think 4 or 5 exposures would
                probably be the maximum one would need for almost all scenes. Each of
                these should be processed differently I would think re contrast, color
                and noise control. The shadow exposure for instance should be contrasty
                in the blacks and dark tones and have flat, blownout, highlights.
                Conversely the extreme highlight exposure should have flat midtones and
                shadows -- using selections etc if necessary. Enfuse is like a spatial
                tone separation process rather than a physical scene illumination
                recording and tone mapping process -- at least that is how I think of
                it.

                Peter


                >
                > > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "robert_harshman" <image360@>
                > > wrote:
                > >>
                > >>> http://www.mab3d.com/QTVR/brickworksQTVR.html
                > >>>
                > >>> Comments on the quality of the results (and the panoramas) is
                > >>> appreciated. Enfuse handled the glowing beams of light and overall
                > >>> wide range quite admirably, IMHO.
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