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Re: [PanoToolsNG] opening VERY LARGE files in photoshop

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  • Joergen Geerds
    well, the first stages are creating and editing large images ( 1gpx). and yes it would be great to have all image data in ram, but i can deal with the fact
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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      well, the first stages are creating and editing large
      images (>1gpx). and yes it would be great to have all
      image data in ram, but i can deal with the fact that
      most/some data will be on scratch (and photoshop deal
      with it also fairly well). i do not know why you
      insist on having everything in ram all the time.

      showing large images also doen't need to have all
      image data available all the time... zoomify is an
      awesome example of seeing all the details in an image
      without having to load all the image data:
      http://newyorkpanorama.com/2007/12/17/grand-central/
      my other way of showing my photos to people is making
      large c-prints.

      and i will stop this discussion at this point, since
      it seems to become pointless.

      joergen

      --- Fulvio Senore <mailing@...> wrote:

      > Hi Joergen,
      >
      > it depends on what you are going to do with those
      > very large images.
      >
      > If you only want to edit them in your computer then
      > a 64 bit program and
      > a lot of ram might be enough, but you must have
      > enough ram to keep
      > almost all the image in memory or photoshop will
      > take ages to load it.
      >
      > On the other hand, if you are planning to show that
      > image at full
      > resolution on a reasonably large number of computers
      > (imagine users
      > saying: "ohhhh, how much can I zoom in! I can see my
      >
      > home/wife/dog/car!") you will need a way to show
      > such a large image in
      > an efficient way even if available ram is much
      > smaller than the image size.
      >
      > Fulvio Senore
      >
      > Joergen Geerds ha scritto:
      > > hi fulvio,
      > >
      > > i think you are wrong. photoshop is quite capable
      > of
      > > opening gigantic files, all it takes is enough
      > > patience and scratchdisk. photoshop gave up long
      > time
      > > ago to keep all the image data in ram, and has
      > pretty
      > > good caching methods (although they are not the
      > > fastest caching routines, and scratchswapping
      > becomes
      > > painfully slow with large files, even with fast
      > > RAIDs).
      > >
      > > what we need for the future is a 64bit photoshop.
      > OSX
      > > is now 64bit on the front end, and the new
      > machines
      > > take 32GB of ram. can't wait for that to happen.
      > can
      > > anybody nudge john nack to give us a 64bit PS?
      > >
      > > joergen
      > >
      > > --- Fulvio Senore <mailing@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >> I think that it is not possible to open such a
      > file
      > >> using a "normal"
      > >> file format like tiff and "normal" software like
      > >> photoshop.
      > >>
      > >> Those solutions are designed to keep the whole
      > image
      > >> in RAM, so they
      > >> cannot work decently with images much larger than
      > >> available ram.
      > >>
      > >> A long time ago there was a program (probably
      > from
      > >> the makers of
      > >> PhotoVista, does anybody remember it?) that used
      > the
      > >> FlashPix file
      > >> format to edit images much larger than available
      > >> memory. A flashpix file
      > >> contained an image stored at different
      > resolutions,
      > >> so the program could
      > >> load a smaller version when showing the full
      > image
      > >> and load only the
      > >> needed portion of the full resolution one when
      > >> needed.
      > >>
      > >> Probably we would need a program working in a
      > >> similar way to handle very
      > >> images, but I don't know if anybody will ever
      > >> develop such a software.
      > >>
      > >> Fulvio Senore
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Jeffrey Martin ha scritto:
      > >>
      > >>> i have a file that is
      > >>> 10,277,523 kb (about 10gb)
      > >>>
      > >>> WHO has opened a file that big, or bigger?
      > >>>
      > >>> CS3 threw up and died, as usual.
      > >>> CS2 opens it in about 25 minutes but then
      > becomes
      > >>>
      > >> almost completely
      > >>
      > >>> unresponsive.
      > >>>
      > >>> i'm running 4 disk raid 0 stripe and it's still
      > >>>
      > >> pretty unbearable. I guess
      > >>
      > >>> there is no real solution except to be patient
      > and
      > >>>
      > >> have another computer
      > >>
      > >>> handy for doing other stuff while waiting for
      > >>>
      > >> photoshop?
      > >>
      > >>> :-O
      > >>>
      > >>> thanks,
      > >>> Jeffrey
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      > > Be a better friend, newshound, and
      > > know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
      >
      http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
      >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >



      ____________________________________________________________________________________
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    • alexandre jenny
      Photoshop is really good at that. We were amazed that it managed to open our harlem 13 gigapixels panorama on a standard computer ( windows 32bits, athlon
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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        Photoshop is really good at that.
        We were amazed that it managed to open our harlem 13 gigapixels panorama
        on a standard computer ( windows 32bits, athlon 2ghz, 2 giga memory ) :
        - file to open : 50 GB in psb format,
        - one full harddrive for scratch disk ( 250 Giga ),
        - one hour to open it.
        Once opened, you can easily navigate into the picture quite like it were a
        standard
        pictures. This is really amazing to achieve such a performance just in
        navigation.
        We didn't tried any operation on the file like level tool or anything.
        The only check we did was to try the zoomify export for this picture. It
        failes not because
        of photoshop, but probably because of some bug in the zoomify export tool :
        no crash
        but all exported pictures were wrong.

        Alexandre
        Kolor




        _____

        De : PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] De la
        part de Jeffrey Martin
        Envoyé : mardi 8 janvier 2008 17:35
        À : panotoolsng
        Objet : [PanoToolsNG] opening VERY LARGE files in photoshop




        i have a file that is
        10,277,523 kb (about 10gb)

        WHO has opened a file that big, or bigger?

        CS3 threw up and died, as usual.
        CS2 opens it in about 25 minutes but then becomes almost completely
        unresponsive.

        i'm running 4 disk raid 0 stripe and it's still pretty unbearable. I guess
        there is no real solution except to be patient and have another computer
        handy for doing other stuff while waiting for photoshop?

        :-O

        thanks,
        Jeffrey

        --
        =========================
        Jeffrey Martin
        www.360cities.net - The World in Virtual Reality
        Terronska 49, 160 00 Prague 6, Czech Republic
        4 Main St, Suite 60a, Los Altos CA 94022, USA

        tel. +420 608 076 502 / skype jeffrey.s.martin

        www.prague360.com / www.vrlog.net / www.jeffrey-martin.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Don French
        How do you print that 5 x12 image? And on what? ... 12 feet ... Doing ... GB of ... But the ... What ... told ... best to ... everything
        Message 3 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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          How do you print that 5'x12' image? And on what?

          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Drew" <rick@...> wrote:
          >
          > A real world example -
          >
          >
          >
          > I client needed a full size design for a trailer-wrap. The image was
          12 feet
          > by 5 feet, 300 DPI. As you can imagine the image was huge - 1.6 gig.
          Doing
          > ANYTHING took forever. I have 3 TB of SATA II HDD's but only had 2
          GB of
          > RAM. I upped the RAM to 4 gb - I know Windows does not use it all.
          But the
          > end result was 2.4 gig of few RAM available after windows and PhotoShop
          > loaded.
          >
          >
          >
          > This really speeded things up. Yes, still a little slow, but doable.
          What
          > really ticked me off was that the client (the printer) could not open or
          > process the file! He had never dealt with a file this large and just
          > "assumed" he could use it! Originally he had asked for 1200 dpi - I
          told
          > him that was impossible (over 35 gig file size!) - 300 dpi was the
          best to
          > expect at actual size.
          >
          >
          >
          > In my case, just upping the RAM was a huge help - I already had
          everything
          > else optimized.
          >
          >
          >
          > Rick Drew
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Joergen Geerds
          ... inkjet or lightjet, inkjet on almost anything, lightjet on photopaper or duratrans... how else do you think those large billboards on skaffoldings are
          Message 4 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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            --- Don French <DCFrench@...> wrote:

            > How do you print that 5'x12' image? And on what?
            inkjet or lightjet, inkjet on almost anything,
            lightjet on photopaper or duratrans... how else do you
            think those large billboards on skaffoldings are done?
            handpainted?

            joergen


            ____________________________________________________________________________________
            Be a better friend, newshound, and
            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
          • Don French
            No, I do not think that billboards are hand-painted. But nor do I think that they are printed on photopaper. It is my impression that almost all billboards
            Message 5 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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              No, I do not think that billboards are hand-painted. But nor do I
              think that they are printed on photopaper. It is my impression that
              almost all billboards are printed on PVC vinyl or polyethylene. Do
              they really use inkjet or lightjet printers for that process? Also,
              some very large format images are printed on fabric using a dye
              sublimation process. But the fabrics are mostly limited to indoor use.

              So anyway, what printers can process and print multi-gigapixel images?
              And back to my original question, how do YOU print images that size?

              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Joergen Geerds <joergengeerds@...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              > --- Don French <DCFrench@...> wrote:
              >
              > > How do you print that 5'x12' image? And on what?
              > inkjet or lightjet, inkjet on almost anything,
              > lightjet on photopaper or duratrans... how else do you
              > think those large billboards on skaffoldings are done?
              > handpainted?
              >
              > joergen
              >
              >
              >
              ____________________________________________________________________________________
              > Be a better friend, newshound, and
              > know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
              http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
              >
            • Keith Martin
              ... Paper, mostly, and in long but manageable-width strips. And traditionally they re screenprinted (for durability and short-run costs) or litho-printed (for
              Message 6 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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                Sometime around 8/1/08 (at 23:03 +0000) Don French said:

                >It is my impression that
                >almost all billboards are printed on PVC vinyl or polyethylene.

                Paper, mostly, and in long but manageable-width strips. And
                traditionally they're screenprinted (for durability and short-run
                costs) or litho-printed (for longer runs).

                One-offs or *very* short runs are generally inkjet output these days,
                but the very large ones are still done in strips.

                k
              • panovrx
                ... use. ... btw many cheapter large print technologies have quite low dpi requirements -- I remember making a mural background for an installation recently
                Message 7 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Don French" <DCFrench@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > No, I do not think that billboards are hand-painted. But nor do I
                  > think that they are printed on photopaper. It is my impression that
                  > almost all billboards are printed on PVC vinyl or polyethylene. Do
                  > they really use inkjet or lightjet printers for that process? Also,
                  > some very large format images are printed on fabric using a dye
                  > sublimation process. But the fabrics are mostly limited to indoor
                  use.
                  >
                  > So anyway, what printers can process and print multi-gigapixel images?
                  > And back to my original question, how do YOU print images that size?

                  btw many cheapter large print technologies have quite low dpi
                  requirements -- I remember making a mural background for an
                  installation recently about 4m by 3m and what the printer needed was
                  maybe a 300-400meg file

                  also btw for giant prints from regular images smart resizing software
                  (fractal) is very useful

                  Peter
                • Rick Drew
                  There are special printers designed for vehicle wraps and others for huge prints (Google 16 Scitex Grand Jet printers) The Scitex Grand prints 16 by any
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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                    There are special printers designed for vehicle wraps and others for huge
                    prints (Google 16' Scitex Grand Jet printers)



                    The Scitex Grand prints 16' by any length!



                    Rick Drew









                    From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf Of Don French
                    Sent: 2008-01-08 14:23
                    To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Re: opening VERY LARGE files in photoshop



                    How do you print that 5'x12' image? And on what?

                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com <mailto:PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                    "Rick Drew" <rick@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > A real world example -
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I client needed a full size design for a trailer-wrap. The image was
                    12 feet
                    > by 5 feet, 300 DPI. As you can imagine the image was huge - 1.6 gig.
                    Doing
                    > ANYTHING took forever. I have 3 TB of SATA II HDD's but only had 2
                    GB of
                    > RAM. I upped the RAM to 4 gb - I know Windows does not use it all.
                    But the
                    > end result was 2.4 gig of few RAM available after windows and PhotoShop
                    > loaded.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > This really speeded things up. Yes, still a little slow, but doable.
                    What
                    > really ticked me off was that the client (the printer) could not open or
                    > process the file! He had never dealt with a file this large and just
                    > "assumed" he could use it! Originally he had asked for 1200 dpi - I
                    told
                    > him that was impossible (over 35 gig file size!) - 300 dpi was the
                    best to
                    > expect at actual size.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In my case, just upping the RAM was a huge help - I already had
                    everything
                    > else optimized.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Rick Drew
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Chris Thomas
                    This printer didn t know squat about his trade! Billboards can be printed on vinyl or paper but they are never, I repeat never printed at 300 dpi! A high rez
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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                      This printer didn't know "squat" about his trade!



                      Billboards can be printed on vinyl or paper but they are never, I repeat
                      never printed at 300 dpi!

                      A high rez billboard file would be 72 dpi ranging down to as low as 12 dpi.



                      Since the viewer is a long way away from the "output" they don't see the
                      choppiness.

                      Large 10' printers like a Rowland are standard.. Epson doesn't make printers
                      big enough for the billboard industry.



                      PS. Joergen-The Lightjet 5000 printer has a maximum print size of 50" x 97".



                      Chris Thomas

                      Photographer

                      cell... 403-615-1212

                      In North America

                      call... 1-800-870-5110

                      <http://www.christhomas.com/> http://www.christhomas.com



                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
                      Behalf Of Don French
                      Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2008 3:04 PM
                      To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Re: opening VERY LARGE files in photoshop



                      No, I do not think that billboards are hand-painted. But nor do I
                      think that they are printed on photopaper. It is my impression that
                      almost all billboards are printed on PVC vinyl or polyethylene. Do
                      they really use inkjet or lightjet printers for that process? Also,
                      some very large format images are printed on fabric using a dye
                      sublimation process. But the fabrics are mostly limited to indoor use.

                      So anyway, what printers can process and print multi-gigapixel images?
                      And back to my original question, how do YOU print images that size?

                      --- In PanoToolsNG@ <mailto:PanoToolsNG%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com,
                      Joergen Geerds <joergengeerds@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > --- Don French <DCFrench@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > How do you print that 5'x12' image? And on what?
                      > inkjet or lightjet, inkjet on almost anything,
                      > lightjet on photopaper or duratrans... how else do you
                      > think those large billboards on skaffoldings are done?
                      > handpainted?
                      >
                      > joergen
                      [Chris Thomas] snip



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • AYRTON - avi
                      ... I had it, Live Picture !!! at the time PS was 2.5 version AYRTON ... -- AYRTON 21-9982.6313 www.ayrton.com Ladeira de
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jan 8, 2008
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                        On 1/8/08, Fulvio Senore <mailing@...> wrote:
                        > A long time ago there was a program (probably from the makers of
                        > PhotoVista, does anybody remember it?) that used the FlashPix file
                        > format to edit images much larger than available memory. A flashpix file
                        > contained an image stored at different resolutions, so the program could
                        > load a smaller version when showing the full image and load only the
                        > needed portion of the full resolution one when needed.

                        I had it,

                        Live Picture !!!

                        at the time PS was 2.5 version


                        AYRTON


                        >
                        > Probably we would need a program working in a similar way to handle very
                        > images, but I don't know if anybody will ever develop such a software.
                        >
                        > Fulvio Senore
                        >
                        >
                        > Jeffrey Martin ha scritto:
                        > > i have a file that is
                        > > 10,277,523 kb (about 10gb)
                        > >
                        > > WHO has opened a file that big, or bigger?
                        > >
                        > > CS3 threw up and died, as usual.
                        > > CS2 opens it in about 25 minutes but then becomes almost completely
                        > > unresponsive.
                        > >
                        > > i'm running 4 disk raid 0 stripe and it's still pretty unbearable. I guess
                        > > there is no real solution except to be patient and have another computer
                        > > handy for doing other stuff while waiting for photoshop?
                        > >
                        > > :-O
                        > >
                        > > thanks,
                        > > Jeffrey
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        --
                        AYRTON 21-9982.6313 www.ayrton.com
                        Ladeira de Nossa Senhora, 214 / sl. 101 www.vrfolio.com
                        Outeiro da Glória - RJ - 22211-100 - Brasil www.vr-images.com
                        Panoramas do Rio de Janeiro www.rio360.com.br
                      • Keith Martin
                        ... Very true. If something s only going to be viewed from a few yards/metres away at the closest, it doesn t need to be anywhere near the 300-350ppi that
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jan 9, 2008
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                          Sometime around 8/1/08 (at 23:23 +0000) panovrx said:

                          >btw many cheapter large print technologies have quite low dpi
                          >requirements -- I remember making a mural background for an
                          >installation recently about 4m by 3m and what the printer needed was
                          >maybe a 300-400meg file

                          Very true. If something's only going to be viewed from a few
                          yards/metres away at the closest, it doesn't need to be anywhere near
                          the 300-350ppi that magazine production requires. 100ppi or less is
                          common, especially with billboards, particularly with screenprinted
                          ones that use very coarse halftone screens.


                          >also btw for giant prints from regular images smart resizing software
                          >(fractal) is very useful

                          Yep. Although these tools shouldn't be regarded as magic fixes; if
                          detail's not there, nothing can add it. (I'm not saying you think
                          that, but I've met far too many people who do!)

                          k
                        • Don French
                          ... The wikipedia article on billboards ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_(advertising) ) claims that billboards are printed on vinyl in a single 14
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jan 9, 2008
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                            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Keith Martin <keith@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Sometime around 8/1/08 (at 23:03 +0000) Don French said:
                            >
                            > >It is my impression that
                            > >almost all billboards are printed on PVC vinyl or polyethylene.
                            >
                            > Paper, mostly, and in long but manageable-width strips. And
                            > traditionally they're screenprinted (for durability and short-run
                            > costs) or litho-printed (for longer runs).
                            >
                            > One-offs or *very* short runs are generally inkjet output these days,
                            > but the very large ones are still done in strips.
                            >
                            > k
                            >
                            The wikipedia article on billboards (
                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_(advertising) ) claims that
                            billboards are printed on vinyl in a single 14 foot wide strip. But
                            maybe that is just in the US and perhaps they still do it the old way
                            in the UK.
                          • paul womack
                            ... Bizarrely the worst thing (for the app) is having the image fit the screen; when zoomed in (1:1 view) photoshop only needs to have the pixels you re
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jan 9, 2008
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                              alexandre jenny wrote:
                              > Photoshop is really good at that.
                              > We were amazed that it managed to open our harlem 13 gigapixels panorama
                              > on a standard computer ( windows 32bits, athlon 2ghz, 2 giga memory ) :
                              > - file to open : 50 GB in psb format,
                              > - one full harddrive for scratch disk ( 250 Giga ),
                              > - one hour to open it.
                              > Once opened, you can easily navigate into the picture quite like it were a
                              > standard
                              > pictures. This is really amazing to achieve such a performance just in
                              > navigation.
                              > We didn't tried any operation on the file like level tool or anything.
                              > The only check we did was to try the zoomify export for this picture. It
                              > failes not because
                              > of photoshop, but probably because of some bug in the zoomify export tool :
                              > no crash
                              > but all exported pictures were wrong.

                              Bizarrely the worst thing (for the app) is having the image
                              fit the screen; when zoomed in (1:1 view) photoshop
                              only needs to have the pixels you're looking at in RAM,
                              and possibly the adjacent pixels, when you pan-scroll.

                              Photoshop AFAIK uses a tiled cache (as does GIMP).

                              I wish BOTH had an option to open a file at 1:1, as opposed
                              to fit-to-screen.

                              FlashPix (and some others) use a pyramidal format
                              which allows all the features of the tiled system,
                              and also allows easy viewing at fit-to-screen size,
                              but is much more complex to manipulate; probably only
                              a good choice for view-only applications.

                              BugBear
                            • Don French
                              Yes, traditional billboards are meant to be viewed at considerable distance. But someone who creates a multi-gigapixel panoramic image might prefer that people
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jan 9, 2008
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                                Yes, traditional billboards are meant to be viewed at considerable
                                distance. But someone who creates a multi-gigapixel panoramic image
                                might prefer that people be able to see all the amazing detail that
                                exists in the image. I am imagining such a print hanging in a lobby or
                                a boardroom or a great room, not up on a highway sign.

                                If a 10GP image is 50,000 pixels by 200,000 pixels, for example, and
                                it is printed at 300 dpi to display the detail at the full resolution,
                                it would be about 14 feet high by 55 feet wide, very close to
                                billboard size. I would love to be able to create a seamless print of
                                these dimensions and at this resolution, but I am not sure what
                                material you could print on that would losslessly support that DPI and
                                which is available in 14 foot wide rolls.


                                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "panovrx" <mediavr@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Don French" <DCFrench@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > No, I do not think that billboards are hand-painted. But nor do I
                                > > think that they are printed on photopaper. It is my impression that
                                > > almost all billboards are printed on PVC vinyl or polyethylene. Do
                                > > they really use inkjet or lightjet printers for that process? Also,
                                > > some very large format images are printed on fabric using a dye
                                > > sublimation process. But the fabrics are mostly limited to indoor
                                > use.
                                > >
                                > > So anyway, what printers can process and print multi-gigapixel images?
                                > > And back to my original question, how do YOU print images that size?
                                >
                                > btw many cheapter large print technologies have quite low dpi
                                > requirements -- I remember making a mural background for an
                                > installation recently about 4m by 3m and what the printer needed was
                                > maybe a 300-400meg file
                                >
                                > also btw for giant prints from regular images smart resizing software
                                > (fractal) is very useful
                                >
                                > Peter
                                >
                              • Michael Hansky
                                Handling large files can be done with VIPS. Maybe its worth to take a look on it. http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=VIPS VIPS is a free image
                                Message 15 of 24 , Jan 9, 2008
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                                  Handling large files can be done with VIPS.
                                  Maybe its worth to take a look on it.

                                  http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=VIPS

                                  "VIPS is a free image processing system. It aims to be about half-way
                                  between Photoshop and Excel. It is very bad at retouching photographs,
                                  but very handy for the many other imaging tasks that programs like
                                  Photoshop get used for. It is good with large images (images larger than
                                  the amount of RAM you have available), with many CPUs (see Benchmarks
                                  <http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=Benchmarks>), for
                                  working with colour and for general research & development.

                                  It comes in two main parts: libvips
                                  <http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=Libvips> is the
                                  image-processing library and nip2
                                  <http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=Nip2> is the graphical
                                  user-interface. Both work on Unix (with convenient packages for most
                                  popular distributions, see links
                                  <http://www.vips.ecs.soton.ac.uk/index.php?title=Links>), Windows (NT,
                                  2k and XP tested) and Macintosh (OS 10.2 and later). The VIPS library is
                                  licensed under the LGPL and and the user-interfaces are licensed under
                                  the GPL. See http://www.gnu.org."




                                  Havent tried it, but....




                                  mit freundlichen Grüßen


                                  Michael Hansky
                                  INXS Media - Bodensee360.de
                                  Seestr. 19
                                  88690 Uhldingen

                                  Tel. 07556 - 966 440
                                  Fax. 07556 - 92 99 654

                                  www.bodensee360.de
                                  www.inxs-media.de
                                • Keith Martin
                                  ... In fact, poster printing is done in both the new way(s) and the old way(s) in the US, just as it is done the new way(s) and the old way(s) in the UK. Some
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jan 9, 2008
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                                    Sometime around 9/1/08 (at 09:20 +0000) Don French said:

                                    >The wikipedia article on billboards (
                                    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billboard_(advertising) ) claims that
                                    >billboards are printed on vinyl in a single 14 foot wide strip. But
                                    >maybe that is just in the US and perhaps they still do it the old way
                                    >in the UK.

                                    In fact, poster printing is done in both the new way(s) and the old
                                    way(s) in the US, just as it is done the new way(s) and the old
                                    way(s) in the UK.

                                    Some billboards are printed on paper, some on vinyl, some on fabric,
                                    some on plastic strips (rotating displays), etc. Some are printed
                                    using inkjet processes, some using photographic methods, some using
                                    screenprint, some using offset litho...
                                    Although some are less common than others, there is *no* single
                                    method or medium.


                                    BTW, Wikipedia is probably better described as the fount of all
                                    rumours, not all knowledge. It is a good resource, but it should
                                    never be regarded as a definitive souce of information; always
                                    cross-check and be ready to reassess or even disregard what's
                                    published there.

                                    And in fact a fair amount of what's said in that particular article
                                    makes too-broad assumptions, is misleading or, in some cases, is
                                    simply untrue. It is also missing key information, for example
                                    explanations of 48-sheet or 96-sheet posters/billboards.

                                    k
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