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Re: [PanoToolsNG] pseudo "scanning" a large map

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  • paul womack
    ... Just a followup; I did a test run yesterday afternoon; made a 4x6 images pano, at half res (so 1224x1632 per image) on my home laptop (*). I made some
    Message 1 of 39 , Dec 3, 2007
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      paul womack wrote:
      > Bruno Postle wrote:
      >>> and making a simple "tiled" set of photos.
      >> If you use a pano-head and don't move the camera, then this is just
      >> a 'normal' panorama, just set your output to 'rectilinear' and use
      >> horizontal and vertical control points to straighten it up.
      >>
      >
      > Sounds like my life is going to be easier than I thought.

      Just a followup; I did a "test run" yesterday afternoon;
      made a 4x6 images pano, at half res (so 1224x1632 per image)
      on my home laptop (*).

      I made some mistakes.

      I used my wooden pano head at the end of the
      horizontal column of my Benbo trecker tripod,
      with the map on floor; the camera was around 4 feet
      in the air.

      Since the situation was so well controlled
      (so I thought) I didn't allow much overlap.

      In the first stitch I didn't do nearly enough control
      points; somehow (mistakenly) I thought panotools
      would magically know that this was a simple job;
      but panotools only (of course) knows what it's
      been told via control points.

      Since the background of the map is so
      uniform, minor changes in room lighting
      have given me stitching errors. The map
      was under 4 tungsten lights, but the variation
      in light from window caused differences.

      After "cramming in" enough control points,
      the stitch went fine, as well it might using a 100mm
      (35 mm equivalent) lens. Not much distortion...

      I hope this is of interest or assistance to someone.

      BugBear

      (*) 333Mhz pentium, 350 Mb RAM
    • paul womack
      ... Hmm. Then I lose the benefit of easy stitching. If I simply do this at night, when ALL the light is artificial (and thus constant) I ll avoid this problem.
      Message 39 of 39 , Dec 5, 2007
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        Sacha Griffin wrote:
        > Yup! :-)
        >
        > Been there. Lighting is key for mosaic scanning, even more so for very
        > reflective materials.
        >
        > It's MUCH better to move the artwork, than the camera, keeping the lights
        > static. Albeit maybe more of a pain?
        >
        > Anyway, it's probably close enough to be happy with. Congrats.

        Hmm. Then I lose the benefit of easy stitching.

        If I simply do this at night, when ALL the light
        is artificial (and thus constant) I'll avoid
        this problem.

        I then have a secondary task of either starting
        acheiving UNIFORM light over the map, or post-touching
        to achieve it.

        BugBear
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