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Re: 375 panos from ANWR

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  • Juergen Schrader
    Great project, Matt. What I really like about panoramas is that one can get a documentary view of regions that are more or less out of reach. Thanks for
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 31, 2007
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      Great project, Matt.
      What I really like about panoramas is that one can get a documentary
      view of regions that are more or less out of reach. Thanks for
      sharing and please keep em coming.

      I don't know how other RAW tools handle this issue but one thing I
      like most about Adobes Lightroom is that you can easily remove sensor
      dust and apply the removal settings of a single picture to as many
      pictures as you like. This comes very handy if your sensor is not the
      cleanest and one needs to develop a huge amount of pictures with
      skies in it.

      Cheers
      Juergen




      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "matt_nolan_uaf" <matt.nolan@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > All,
      >
      > I just wanted to let you know that I just returned from a month in
      > the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (northeastern Alaska), where I
      > took 18,032 photos, most of them panoramas, and to thank you all
      for
      > the help you gave me before I left.
      >
      > I sorted through them to find that I had taken 376 panoramas, all
      > with a D2xs and most with the nikkor 10.5 mm fisheye, but also
      about
      > 30 with a Nikkor 18-200mm (some full panoramas at 18-35mm but
      mostly
      > 150-200m partial gigapixel panoramas). The fisheye panos were taken
      > from a rig inspired by Milko's designs, with the camera mounted on
      a
      > monopod walking stick with a swivel tilt head with RRS clamp and
      > nodal slide, with the camera angled slightly down so that no nadir
      > shot was needed, hopefully ensuring a reasonably accurate
      vegetation
      > stitch with a small footprint (the bail of the walking stick), and
      > one zenith shot made by tilting the camera up and moving the
      monopod
      > a camera width to the side to account for the shift in lens
      position
      > (thinking that parallex errors are minimal with such distant
      > subjects). The higher focal length panos were taken on a Gitzo
      > tripod with RRS pano gear or Seitz motor drive. I shot in RAW
      > compressed mode for nearly everything, including the HDR panoramas.
      >
      > The purpose of these panoramas was two-fold. First was scientific,
      > I'm trying to document the state of the Arctic in this region as
      part
      > of the 4th International Polar Year (www.ipy.org) now ongoing and
      use
      > them in support of various scientific tasks. Second was for
      > outreach, to create an online panoramic environment where folks can
      > travel along with us, from the coastal plain through ice age
      moraines
      > through modern moraines up onto glaciers and up to the highest
      peaks,
      > jumping from one pano to the next via embedded hyperlinks. All of
      > the photos were taken with a GPS attached to the camera, so are
      > easily georeference for tools like Google Earth.
      >
      > Anyway, I just wanted to say thanks again and let you know that
      over
      > the coming weeks to months I'll have lots of questions, and
      hopefully
      > lots of nice images to share. Also, if anyone has ideas for good
      > ways to make use of these photos, please feel free to share them
      with
      > me. As an academic project, my intent is to share them freely once
      > processed (though this may take some time...). I posted a few test
      > stitches here at various resolutions:
      > http://www.uaf.edu/water/faculty/nolan/temp/anwrpanos/
      teststitches/.
      > Note that these are just fully automated PTgui stitches with no
      > corrections for C/A, sensor dust, misaligned stitches, etc., but
      they
      > range from coastal plain from mountains, and should give you a
      sense
      > of the scenery (you need your own pano viewer, these are just
      jpgs).
      >
      > One question I could start with are suggestions for workflow.
      > Perhaps there are online descriptions of this already? What I know
      I
      > need to do are correct for C/A (extreme in some cases), remove
      sensor
      > dust, convert from RAW to something stitchable, adjust white
      balance
      > and histogram, stitch, and sharpen. Maybe I'm missing steps? Then
      > once processed, I want to create an online display environment.
      I'd
      > like to have the highest resolution available (10,000x 5000 pixels
      > for my 10.5mm) but perhaps this is too heavy for web? Are there
      > display tools that allow for 'pyramid layering', such that a low
      > resolution preview shows up first, but then more data is streamed
      > when the user zooms in? This is how Google Earth works. The tools
      I
      > have currently include CS2 w/ RAW, ACDSee Pro w/ RAW, PTgui Pro,
      > Nikon Capture NX, and RealVis Stitcher Pro. I barely know how to
      use
      > CS2 and have not yet even installed Stitcher. What to use for the
      > display and hyperlink software? I think I would like to use a
      Flash
      > method since nearly everyone has Flash installed, but I have no
      sense
      > of what the trade-offs are compared to QTVR. I have funds to buy
      > nearly any software reasonable for this purpose. Anyway, any
      > thoughts are appreciated, and feel free to email me directly as
      well
      > matt.nolan@...
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Matt
      >
    • R Stoney
      Matt, That sounds like exactly what I would love to do! I have just returned from a cross country road trip where I shot a bunch of 360 s in some of our
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 16 11:38 PM
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        Matt, That sounds like exactly what I would love to do!
        I have just returned from a cross country road trip where I shot a
        bunch of 360's in some of our National Parks. I am sitting here with a
        hard drive full and no stitching workflow put together yet. I have
        tried Realviz Stitcher, but my old computer cannot complete a full
        resolution stitch, it just locks up. I have had some success with
        PTGui and limited success with Hugin. I am really interested to hear
        some anwers to your inquiry. Would some experienced panagraphers offer
        their workflow as suggestions?



        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "matt_nolan_uaf" <matt.nolan@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > All,
        >
        > I just wanted to let you know that I just returned from a month in
        > the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (northeastern Alaska), where I
        > took 18,032 photos, most of them panoramas, and to thank you all for
        > the help you gave me before I left.
        >
        > I sorted through them to find that I had taken 376 panoramas, all
        > with a D2xs and most with the nikkor 10.5 mm fisheye, but also about
        > 30 with a Nikkor 18-200mm (some full panoramas at 18-35mm but mostly
        > 150-200m partial gigapixel panoramas). The fisheye panos were taken
        > from a rig inspired by Milko's designs, with the camera mounted on a
        > monopod walking stick with a swivel tilt head with RRS clamp and
        > nodal slide, with the camera angled slightly down so that no nadir
        > shot was needed, hopefully ensuring a reasonably accurate vegetation
        > stitch with a small footprint (the bail of the walking stick), and
        > one zenith shot made by tilting the camera up and moving the monopod
        > a camera width to the side to account for the shift in lens position
        > (thinking that parallex errors are minimal with such distant
        > subjects). The higher focal length panos were taken on a Gitzo
        > tripod with RRS pano gear or Seitz motor drive. I shot in RAW
        > compressed mode for nearly everything, including the HDR panoramas.
        >
        > The purpose of these panoramas was two-fold. First was scientific,
        > I'm trying to document the state of the Arctic in this region as part
        > of the 4th International Polar Year (www.ipy.org) now ongoing and use
        > them in support of various scientific tasks. Second was for
        > outreach, to create an online panoramic environment where folks can
        > travel along with us, from the coastal plain through ice age moraines
        > through modern moraines up onto glaciers and up to the highest peaks,
        > jumping from one pano to the next via embedded hyperlinks. All of
        > the photos were taken with a GPS attached to the camera, so are
        > easily georeference for tools like Google Earth.
        >
        > Anyway, I just wanted to say thanks again and let you know that over
        > the coming weeks to months I'll have lots of questions, and hopefully
        > lots of nice images to share. Also, if anyone has ideas for good
        > ways to make use of these photos, please feel free to share them with
        > me. As an academic project, my intent is to share them freely once
        > processed (though this may take some time...). I posted a few test
        > stitches here at various resolutions:
        > http://www.uaf.edu/water/faculty/nolan/temp/anwrpanos/teststitches/.
        > Note that these are just fully automated PTgui stitches with no
        > corrections for C/A, sensor dust, misaligned stitches, etc., but they
        > range from coastal plain from mountains, and should give you a sense
        > of the scenery (you need your own pano viewer, these are just jpgs).
        >
        > One question I could start with are suggestions for workflow.
        > Perhaps there are online descriptions of this already? What I know I
        > need to do are correct for C/A (extreme in some cases), remove sensor
        > dust, convert from RAW to something stitchable, adjust white balance
        > and histogram, stitch, and sharpen. Maybe I'm missing steps? Then
        > once processed, I want to create an online display environment. I'd
        > like to have the highest resolution available (10,000x 5000 pixels
        > for my 10.5mm) but perhaps this is too heavy for web? Are there
        > display tools that allow for 'pyramid layering', such that a low
        > resolution preview shows up first, but then more data is streamed
        > when the user zooms in? This is how Google Earth works. The tools I
        > have currently include CS2 w/ RAW, ACDSee Pro w/ RAW, PTgui Pro,
        > Nikon Capture NX, and RealVis Stitcher Pro. I barely know how to use
        > CS2 and have not yet even installed Stitcher. What to use for the
        > display and hyperlink software? I think I would like to use a Flash
        > method since nearly everyone has Flash installed, but I have no sense
        > of what the trade-offs are compared to QTVR. I have funds to buy
        > nearly any software reasonable for this purpose. Anyway, any
        > thoughts are appreciated, and feel free to email me directly as well
        > matt.nolan@...
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Matt
        >
      • Pat Swovelin
        ... What computer do you have (OS, CPU, RAM, etc.)? Knowing that we can give you a more targeted answer. Pat Swovelin Cool Guy @ Large
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 17 12:24 AM
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          On 9/16/2007 11:38 PM, R Stoney rambled on about ...:
          > Matt, That sounds like exactly what I would love to do!
          > I have just returned from a cross country road trip where I shot a
          > bunch of 360's in some of our National Parks. I am sitting here with a
          > hard drive full and no stitching workflow put together yet. I have
          > tried Realviz Stitcher, but my old computer cannot complete a full
          > resolution stitch, it just locks up. I have had some success with
          > PTGui and limited success with Hugin. I am really interested to hear
          > some anwers to your inquiry. Would some experienced panagraphers offer
          > their workflow as suggestions?
          What computer do you have (OS, CPU, RAM, etc.)? Knowing that we can
          give you a more targeted answer.




          Pat Swovelin
          Cool Guy @ Large
        • matt_nolan_uaf
          Hi R. I have received a lot of useful suggestions for workflow, and I m still trying to work through them given my own constraints and needs. In short, I m
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 17 1:01 AM
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            Hi R. I have received a lot of useful suggestions for workflow, and
            I'm still trying to work through them given my own constraints and
            needs.

            In short, I'm using PTgui Pro exclusively, and using it in manual
            mode. I'm working on calibrating my lens well enough so that I only
            need several control points per pair of images, and use these only to
            optimize the image alignment since the lens characteristics are already
            defined. Using automatic control points gives unpredictable results,
            and usually soaks up as much time in checking them as picking manual
            ones. I realized in this process that my shooting technique was
            flawed, in that I did not keep my monopod vertical enough or my
            segments equal enough for perfect stitching. Both are required, the
            verticalness to keep the NPP stationary and the segments equal because
            the NPP for fisheye lenses depends on angle. The idea is if the
            segments are equal, then the stitching occurs at the same angle in each
            and that a perfect stitch can be achieved. I'm also learning about
            exposure and lens compensations. I'm using ACDSee's and Photoshop
            CS2's RAW tools for this. Though I find ACDSee easier to use, I like
            Photoshop better because it always shows what's happening in the
            histogram. The TCA correction is also better in Photoshop I think. I
            havent yet gotten to the point to correct sensor dust, but I'm getting
            there. I've almost got the stitching part solved. In addition to the
            lens calibration trick, selecting control points on the distant horizon
            seems to work great, as well as using Smartblend to cover up the
            unavoidable stitching issues. I've got about 20 panoramas stitched
            now, none of which I consider in final form yet.
            http://www.uaf.edu/water/faculty/nolan/mccall/anwrpanos/demo.htm
            Please have a look, but I'd suggest holding off on critiques until I
            get them to a point where I've tried to deal with all of things I
            already know I need to deal with, at which point I'll be happy to get
            feedback. I used pano2VR for the Flash encoding; I also tried
            flashpanoramas, but it was a little more complicated than I could
            handle at the time.
            Cheers
            Matt



            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "R Stoney" <rsstoney@...> wrote:
            >
            > Matt, That sounds like exactly what I would love to do!
            > I have just returned from a cross country road trip where I shot a
            > bunch of 360's in some of our National Parks. I am sitting here with a
            > hard drive full and no stitching workflow put together yet. I have
            > tried Realviz Stitcher, but my old computer cannot complete a full
            > resolution stitch, it just locks up. I have had some success with
            > PTGui and limited success with Hugin. I am really interested to hear
            > some anwers to your inquiry. Would some experienced panagraphers offer
            > their workflow as suggestions?
            >
            >
          • R Stoney
            I was on a PC 1.4Ghz 512mb memory using PTgui and Realviz Stitcher. I have just converted to Macbook Pro 2.4Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo with 2GB sdram. I have no
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 17 1:06 AM
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              I was on a PC 1.4Ghz 512mb memory using PTgui and Realviz Stitcher.
              I have just converted to Macbook Pro 2.4Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo with 2GB
              sdram. I have no software for the Mac OS. I shot raw with a Canon 5d
              using the 17mm on the 17-40. I don't have excess funds right now and I
              was looking into Hugin with autopano sift, but I am not a developer
              and it looks quite complicated to install the autopano sift.
              I was wondering what other people used.. but more targeted answer
              would be greatly appreciated as well

              Thanks,
              R Stoney


              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Pat Swovelin <Panoramas@...> wrote:
              >
              > On 9/16/2007 11:38 PM, R Stoney rambled on about ...:
              > > Matt, That sounds like exactly what I would love to do!
              > > I have just returned from a cross country road trip where I shot a
              > > bunch of 360's in some of our National Parks. I am sitting here with a
              > > hard drive full and no stitching workflow put together yet. I have
              > > tried Realviz Stitcher, but my old computer cannot complete a full
              > > resolution stitch, it just locks up. I have had some success with
              > > PTGui and limited success with Hugin. I am really interested to hear
              > > some anwers to your inquiry. Would some experienced panagraphers offer
              > > their workflow as suggestions?
              > What computer do you have (OS, CPU, RAM, etc.)? Knowing that we can
              > give you a more targeted answer.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Pat Swovelin
              > Cool Guy @ Large
              >
            • Hans Nyberg
              ... You say you have used PTGui. So why do you not continue using the Mac version? Serial is cross compatible. PTGui on Mac is almost identical to the PC
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 17 3:05 AM
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                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "R Stoney" <rsstoney@...> wrote:
                >
                > I was on a PC 1.4Ghz 512mb memory using PTgui and Realviz Stitcher.
                > I have just converted to Macbook Pro 2.4Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo with 2GB
                > sdram. I have no software for the Mac OS. I shot raw with a Canon 5d
                > using the 17mm on the 17-40. I don't have excess funds right now and I
                > was looking into Hugin with autopano sift, but I am not a developer
                > and it looks quite complicated to install the autopano sift.
                > I was wondering what other people used.. but more targeted answer
                > would be greatly appreciated as well

                You say you have used PTGui. So why do you not continue using the Mac version?
                Serial is cross compatible.

                PTGui on Mac is almost identical to the PC version.
                And it is faster.

                Hans
              • Ryan Stoney
                Thanks for the tip Hans. I didn t realize I could cross over the seriel number. Upon a little digging I found my email and got the program. Then after reading
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 23 11:39 PM
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                  Thanks for the tip Hans. I didn't realize I could cross over the
                  seriel number. Upon a little digging I found my email and got the
                  program. Then after reading some more posts, I've upgraded to the Pro.
                  The cost is clearly worth my hours and hours.
                  Thanks for the insight Matt. Although I have heard great things about
                  ACDSee, I have not used it. I had been using Iview Media Pro for
                  thumbing through and cataloguing for a couple of years. Now I like
                  Lightroom. You could fix the spots on your sensor in an image and
                  paste the correction to multiple images.

                  Cheers,
                  Ryan



                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "matt_nolan_uaf" <matt.nolan@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi R. I have received a lot of useful suggestions for workflow, and
                  > I'm still trying to work through them given my own constraints and
                  > needs.
                  >
                  > In short, I'm using PTgui Pro exclusively, and using it in manual
                  > mode. I'm working on calibrating my lens well enough so that I only
                  > need several control points per pair of images, and use these only to
                  > optimize the image alignment since the lens characteristics are already
                  > defined. Using automatic control points gives unpredictable results,
                  > and usually soaks up as much time in checking them as picking manual
                  > ones. I realized in this process that my shooting technique was
                  > flawed, in that I did not keep my monopod vertical enough or my
                  > segments equal enough for perfect stitching. Both are required, the
                  > verticalness to keep the NPP stationary and the segments equal because
                  > the NPP for fisheye lenses depends on angle. The idea is if the
                  > segments are equal, then the stitching occurs at the same angle in each
                  > and that a perfect stitch can be achieved. I'm also learning about
                  > exposure and lens compensations. I'm using ACDSee's and Photoshop
                  > CS2's RAW tools for this. Though I find ACDSee easier to use, I like
                  > Photoshop better because it always shows what's happening in the
                  > histogram. The TCA correction is also better in Photoshop I think. I
                  > havent yet gotten to the point to correct sensor dust, but I'm getting
                  > there. I've almost got the stitching part solved. In addition to the
                  > lens calibration trick, selecting control points on the distant horizon
                  > seems to work great, as well as using Smartblend to cover up the
                  > unavoidable stitching issues. I've got about 20 panoramas stitched
                  > now, none of which I consider in final form yet.
                  > http://www.uaf.edu/water/faculty/nolan/mccall/anwrpanos/demo.htm
                  > Please have a look, but I'd suggest holding off on critiques until I
                  > get them to a point where I've tried to deal with all of things I
                  > already know I need to deal with, at which point I'll be happy to get
                  > feedback. I used pano2VR for the Flash encoding; I also tried
                  > flashpanoramas, but it was a little more complicated than I could
                  > handle at the time.
                  > Cheers
                  > Matt
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "R Stoney" <rsstoney@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Matt, That sounds like exactly what I would love to do!
                  > > I have just returned from a cross country road trip where I shot a
                  > > bunch of 360's in some of our National Parks. I am sitting here with a
                  > > hard drive full and no stitching workflow put together yet. I have
                  > > tried Realviz Stitcher, but my old computer cannot complete a full
                  > > resolution stitch, it just locks up. I have had some success with
                  > > PTGui and limited success with Hugin. I am really interested to hear
                  > > some anwers to your inquiry. Would some experienced panagraphers offer
                  > > their workflow as suggestions?
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
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