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56336Re: HDR tools for Large Panos

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  • kilgore661@btinternet.com
    Mar 3, 2013
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      Thanks for the information on a whole bunch of programs I wasn't aware of.

      What do you mean by "50k"? Do you mean images whose width is 50,000 pixels?

      I am interested to hear you say that Photomatix Pro and Photoshop can tonemap large images because my experience is that is not true. I use PM Pro a lot and talk to the development team regularly about why PM is still crashing on images that are around the 30,000 x 15,000 pixel mark. Photoshop doesn't even recognise HDR files that are over a certain size (in my experience). I looked at SNS but it said that it was limited by memory so my expectation is that it will also fail on large images. Here's why I think that: let's call an image "big" if it contains 1.25Gpix (because 1.25G = 50,000 x 25,0000 and I think that's quite big).The SNS page on memory requirements says it needs 60 bytes per pixel so a big image would need 75GB of memory.

      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Christian Bloch <Blochi@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've been doing some extensive testing on working with very large EXR panos (50K and higher) and tonemapping them. Most software makers don't even have such big images, and so I have continuously been sending them large files for testing purpose.
      >
      > It is indicated in my book, on the huge two-page HDR software comparison (pages 106/107), under a "Large File Handling". Three points mean it can do well, and the only programs so far are: FastPictureViewer CodecPack, Bridge, Photoshop, Picturenaut, Photomatix Pro, SNS-HDR Pro.
      >
      > - Photoshop is stable with large images in 32bit, but of course limited in what you can do with tonemapping. But works great for cleaning up large panos and manual dodge-and-burn techniques.
      >
      > - Picturenaut is rather straight-forward, just works, although with very large images tonemapping is faster when you turn off the Preview.
      >
      > - In Photomatix the best workflow is to first tonemap a scaled down version (8K) to find the right settings, and then use the menu "Automate/Batch Single Photos" to apply this to the full-size image. Photomatix can also read PSB files (must be flattened), but I found it performs best when you save your big pano as Radiance HDR file.
      >
      > Blochi
      >
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