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SV: [Pali] Re: Difference between stem and root

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  • flrobert2000
    Dear Ole, Thank you for the explanation. It is indeed very esoteric! I was actually wondering if the English to be and the Pali Bhuu are somehow
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 11, 2005
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      Dear Ole,
      Thank you for the explanation. It is indeed very esoteric! I was
      actually wondering if the English "to be" and the Pali "Bhuu" are
      somehow etymologically related. They actually sound and look quite
      similar.
      Regards,
      Florent

      > Hello,
      >
      > Actually by looking a few chapters ahead in the second part of
      Buddhadatta
      > (p74) I found the following explanation which kind of makes sense:
      >
      > <<A root is a primitive element of the language, expressing an abstract
      > idea. It is incapable of any grammatical analysis
      >
      > A. It is common in European languages to express the idea contained
      in the
      > root by means of the Infinitive, e.g., Bhuu (to be); but it must be
      borne in
      > mind that the root is not an Infinitive, but a primary element
      expressing a
      > crude idea.
      >
      > B. the Classical Pali Grammarians give all roots ending in
      consonants with a
      > euphonic vowel at the end, e.g., Pac(a) = to cook; Gam(u)=to go.
      This vowel
      > however, does not really belong to the root.>>
      >
      > It is, unfortunately, somewhat more complicated. The /u/ of gam(u)
      is not a
      > euphonic vowel, but a so-called anubandha, an attached letter,
      indicating
      > inflectional pecularities of a specific root. In the case of gam(u),
      the /u/
      > corresponds to Sanskrit /.l/. /u/ was introduced by the Pali grammarians
      > because pali disallows the consonant cluster /m.l/. This anubandha
      indicates
      > that the aorist of the root gam is a so-called root aorist, i.e.,
      that it is
      > derived from the root gam plus augment and inflectional endings. The
      canon
      > actually records a few examples of the root aorist, e.g., agama.m 1.
      sg.,
      > and agama.msu 3. sg.
      > Hope this clarifies a tiny bit of the somewhat esoteric field of pali
      > grammar as reflected in the works of the pali grammarians.
      >
      > With kind regards,
      >
      > Ole Pind
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > With Metta,
      >
      > Florent
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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