Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

SV: [Pali] Re: Difference between stem and root

Expand Messages
  • Ole Holten Pind
    ... Fra: Pali@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Pali@yahoogroups.com] På vegne af flrobert2000 Sendt: 10. oktober 2005 17:04 Til: Pali@yahoogroups.com Emne: [Pali] Re:
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 10, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      -----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
      Fra: Pali@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Pali@yahoogroups.com] På vegne af
      flrobert2000
      Sendt: 10. oktober 2005 17:04
      Til: Pali@yahoogroups.com
      Emne: [Pali] Re: Difference between stem and root

      Hello,

      Actually by looking a few chapters ahead in the second part of Buddhadatta
      (p74) I found the following explanation which kind of makes sense:

      <<A root is a primitive element of the language, expressing an abstract
      idea. It is incapable of any grammatical analysis

      A. It is common in European languages to express the idea contained in the
      root by means of the Infinitive, e.g., Bhuu (to be); but it must be borne in
      mind that the root is not an Infinitive, but a primary element expressing a
      crude idea.

      B. the Classical Pali Grammarians give all roots ending in consonants with a
      euphonic vowel at the end, e.g., Pac(a) = to cook; Gam(u)=to go. This vowel
      however, does not really belong to the root.>>

      It is, unfortunately, somewhat more complicated. The /u/ of gam(u) is not a
      euphonic vowel, but a so-called anubandha, an attached letter, indicating
      inflectional pecularities of a specific root. In the case of gam(u), the /u/
      corresponds to Sanskrit /.l/. /u/ was introduced by the Pali grammarians
      because pali disallows the consonant cluster /m.l/. This anubandha indicates
      that the aorist of the root gam is a so-called root aorist, i.e., that it is
      derived from the root gam plus augment and inflectional endings. The canon
      actually records a few examples of the root aorist, e.g., agama.m 1. sg.,
      and agama.msu 3. sg.
      Hope this clarifies a tiny bit of the somewhat esoteric field of pali
      grammar as reflected in the works of the pali grammarians.

      With kind regards,

      Ole Pind




      With Metta,

      Florent







      ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
      Click here to rescue a little child from a life of poverty.
      http://us.click.yahoo.com/rAWabB/gYnLAA/i1hLAA/b0VolB/TM
      --------------------------------------------------------------------~->

      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - [Homepage]
      http://www.tipitaka.net [Files] http://www.geocities.com/paligroup/
      [Send Message] pali@yahoogroups.com
      Paaliga.na - a community for Pali students Yahoo! Groups members can set
      their delivery options to daily digest or web only.
      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • flrobert2000
      Dear Ole, Thank you for the explanation. It is indeed very esoteric! I was actually wondering if the English to be and the Pali Bhuu are somehow
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 11, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Ole,
        Thank you for the explanation. It is indeed very esoteric! I was
        actually wondering if the English "to be" and the Pali "Bhuu" are
        somehow etymologically related. They actually sound and look quite
        similar.
        Regards,
        Florent

        > Hello,
        >
        > Actually by looking a few chapters ahead in the second part of
        Buddhadatta
        > (p74) I found the following explanation which kind of makes sense:
        >
        > <<A root is a primitive element of the language, expressing an abstract
        > idea. It is incapable of any grammatical analysis
        >
        > A. It is common in European languages to express the idea contained
        in the
        > root by means of the Infinitive, e.g., Bhuu (to be); but it must be
        borne in
        > mind that the root is not an Infinitive, but a primary element
        expressing a
        > crude idea.
        >
        > B. the Classical Pali Grammarians give all roots ending in
        consonants with a
        > euphonic vowel at the end, e.g., Pac(a) = to cook; Gam(u)=to go.
        This vowel
        > however, does not really belong to the root.>>
        >
        > It is, unfortunately, somewhat more complicated. The /u/ of gam(u)
        is not a
        > euphonic vowel, but a so-called anubandha, an attached letter,
        indicating
        > inflectional pecularities of a specific root. In the case of gam(u),
        the /u/
        > corresponds to Sanskrit /.l/. /u/ was introduced by the Pali grammarians
        > because pali disallows the consonant cluster /m.l/. This anubandha
        indicates
        > that the aorist of the root gam is a so-called root aorist, i.e.,
        that it is
        > derived from the root gam plus augment and inflectional endings. The
        canon
        > actually records a few examples of the root aorist, e.g., agama.m 1.
        sg.,
        > and agama.msu 3. sg.
        > Hope this clarifies a tiny bit of the somewhat esoteric field of pali
        > grammar as reflected in the works of the pali grammarians.
        >
        > With kind regards,
        >
        > Ole Pind
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > With Metta,
        >
        > Florent
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
        > Click here to rescue a little child from a life of poverty.
        > http://us.click.yahoo.com/rAWabB/gYnLAA/i1hLAA/b0VolB/TM
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------~->
        >
        > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - [Homepage]
        > http://www.tipitaka.net [Files] http://www.geocities.com/paligroup/
        > [Send Message] pali@yahoogroups.com
        > Paaliga.na - a community for Pali students Yahoo! Groups members can set
        > their delivery options to daily digest or web only.
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.