Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: objectivity, buddhists with no hope of salvation

Expand Messages
  • Ong Yong Peng
    Dear Stephen, Frank and friends, in my humble opinion, I think the ongoing waves of Islamic terrorism is giving confidence to some Christian fundamentalist
    Message 1 of 16 , May 1 12:32 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Stephen, Frank and friends,

      in my humble opinion, I think the ongoing waves of Islamic terrorism
      is giving confidence to some Christian fundamentalist groups. I am
      not writing very well on this since most are passing thoughts. I do
      think that top people in the Catholic Church takes this as an
      opportunity to reclaim the grounds they have lost in the past
      decades. As the richest and most powerful religious activists and
      lobbyists, they like to ensure that the Abrahamic faith is preserved
      exactly in the way they preferred, disregarding that its doctrinal
      foundation is shared by numerous religious denominations, all having
      very diverse views of most of the issues. I think there is a
      likelihood we see things coming round to a full circle, and it would
      trigger a new renaissance, only this time it will be a worldwide
      movement and most probably reduce religions to a bare social
      institution.

      The Buddhist stand on other religions is always embrace and respect,
      and this discussion hardly leads us to anything we want to achieve.
      So, I would suggest that we give the topic a rest, and resume our
      normal activities.


      metta,
      Yong Peng.
    • Dhammanando Bhikkhu
      Bhante, ... Perhaps the monk had in mind the Atthakathaas notion of a sutabuddha. cattaaro hi buddhaa: sutabuddho, catusaccabuddho, paccekabuddho,
      Message 2 of 16 , May 2 10:24 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Bhante,

        Ven. Yuttadhammo wrote:

        > A Sri Lankan monk once gave a lecture in Canada about what
        > the word Buddha means, and he said that he himself might be
        > considered "Buddha" because he had learned a lot in school.
        > Again, I think this is a misuse of the term...

        Perhaps the monk had in mind the Atthakathaas' notion of
        a sutabuddha.

        cattaaro hi buddhaa: sutabuddho, catusaccabuddho,
        paccekabuddho, sabba~n~nubuddho ti
        For [there are] four awakened ones: one awakened
        through learning; one awakened through the four
        truths; one awakened privately; one awakened
        through omniscience.

        tattha bahussuto bhikkhu "sutabuddho" naama.
        In this scheme a bhikkhu who has heard much is
        called "one awakened through learning".

        khii.naasavo "catusaccabuddho" naama.
        He in whom the pollutions are ended is called
        "one awakened through the four truths".

        kappasatasahassaadhikaani dve asa`nkhyeyyaani
        paaramiyo puuretvaa saama.m
        pa.tividdhapaccekabodhi~naa.no "paccekabuddho"
        naama.
        One who after fulfilling the perfections for two
        asankhyeyyas and one hundred thousand kappas,
        has by himself penetrated that knowledge
        called private awakening is called "one awakened
        privately".

        kappasatasahassaadhikaani cattaari vaa a.t.tha vaa
        so.lasa vaa asa`nkhyeyyaani paaramiyo puuretvaa
        ti.n.na.m maaraana.m matthaka.m madditvaa
        pa.tividdhasabba~n~nuta~n~naa.no
        "sabba~n~nubuddho" naama.
        One who after fulfilling the perfections for four,
        eight or sixteen asankhyeyyas and one hundred
        thousand kappas, and trampling on the head of the
        three Maaras, has by himself penetrated that
        knowledge called omniscience, is called an
        omniscient awakened one.

        imesu catuusu buddhesu sabba~n~nubuddhova adutiyo
        naama. na hi tena saddhi.m a~n~no sabba~n~nubuddho
        naama uppajjati.
        Among these four awakened ones, only the omniscient
        awakened one is called 'without a second', because
        another [person] called 'an omniscient awakened one'
        does not arise with him.
        (AA. i. 115)

        Best wishes,

        Dhammanando
      • Daniel
        Hello. I am not sure if the subject is appropriate for the group, if it is not, please see the post as irrelevant. Is it asserted by Theravada monks that
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello.

          I am not sure if the subject is appropriate for the group, if it is not, please
          see the post as irrelevant.





          Is it asserted by Theravada monks that Vipassana (of the Theravada tradition) is
          the original way to practice the Satipathana sutta? Or do they say it was
          "adapted", or alternatively "rediscovered"?


          I think Zen practice also is said to be based upon Satipathana sutta, though it
          is different from Vipassana. And I am not sure whether the Tibetan version of
          practice of "The four foundations of mindfulness" is the same as Vipassana
          approach.



          Have a good day

          ----------------------------------------------------------------
          This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.
        • "Kåre A. Lie"
          ... There is not ONE way to practice the Satipatthana sutta. There are different practical approaches, according to different teachers and their
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            At 19:11 06.04.2006 +0300, you wrote:
            >Hello.
            >
            >I am not sure if the subject is appropriate for the group, if it is not,
            >please
            >see the post as irrelevant.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Is it asserted by Theravada monks that Vipassana (of the Theravada
            >tradition) is
            >the original way to practice the Satipathana sutta? Or do they say it was
            >"adapted", or alternatively "rediscovered"?

            There is not ONE way to practice the Satipatthana sutta. There are
            different practical approaches, according to different teachers and their
            interpretations.

            I suggest you read Jack Kornfield "Living Buddhist Masters", to find a good
            survey of some of those different approaches.

            Best regards,

            Kåre A. Lie
            http://www.lienet.no


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.