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RE: Vipassana

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  • Yuttadhammo
    ... Dear Thomas, I am not able to say when certain words arose. It seems clear from this group s posts that many catch words were around long before the
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 30, 2005
      > > A Sri Lankan monk once gave a lecture in Canada ... claimed that
      > the word "vipassana" doesn't occur in the Tipitaka (it
      > > does, after all).
      > >
      > >
      > Dear Yuttadhammo,
      >
      > I find this word, Vipassana, not only is very seldom
      > mentioned in the SN and SA, but also in the principal four
      > nikayas/agamas (cf. also Pali English Dictionary, p. 627).
      > Why? Is it not an important word being used at the time of
      > the Buddha? Or is it actually created at a relatively late
      > period (after the death of the Buddha)?
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Thomas Law


      Dear Thomas,

      I am not able to say when certain words arose. It seems clear from this
      group's posts that many catch words were around long before the Buddha arose
      in the world (of course dharma and karma are obvious examples). I can give
      some examples of how the Buddha surely used the words vipassanaa, vipassati,
      vipassako, etc quite frequently:

      Aaka"nkheyya ce, bhikkhave, bhikkhu- 'sabrahmacaariina.m piyo ca assa.m
      manaapo ca garu ca bhaavaniiyo caa'ti siilesvevassa paripuurakaarii
      ajjhatta.m cetosamathamanuyutto aniraakatajjhaano vipassanaaya samannaagato
      bruuhetaa su~n~naagaaraana.m.

      MN 6


      Ime kho te, vaccha, dve dhammaa uttari bhaavitaa-samatho ca vipassanaa ca-
      anekadhaatupa.tivedhaaya sa.mvattissanti.

      MN 73 (Note the frequency with which these two terms are found in the MN and
      AN)


      "Atiita.m naanvaagameyya, nappa.tika'nkhe anaagata.m;
      yadatiita.m pahiina.m ta.m, appatta~nca anaagata.m.
      Paccuppanna~nca yo dhamma.m, tattha tattha vipassati;"

      MN 131-4(this seems definitely an important teaching of the Buddha, as it is
      repeated four times in a row)


      Tatra, bhikkhave, yvaaya.m puggalo laabhii ceva hoti ajjhatta.m
      cetosamathassa laabhii adhipa~n~naadhammavipassanaaya, tena, bhikkhave,
      puggalena tesu ceva kusalesu dhammesu pati.t.thaaya uttari aasavaana.m
      khayaaya yogo kara.niiyo.

      AN 4.10.3


      Puna capara.m, aavuso, bhikkhu vipassanaapubba"ngama.m samatha.m bhaaveti.
      Tassa vipassanaapubba"ngama.m samatha.m bhaavayato maggo sa~njaayati. So
      ta.m magga.m aasevati bhaaveti bahuliikaroti. Tassa ta.m magga.m aasevato
      bhaavayato bahuliikarotosa.myojanaani pahiiyanti, anusayaa byantiihonti.

      AN 4.17.10 (This one shows how samatha and vipassana can be coupled in
      different ways)


      Tasmaatiha te, bhikkhu, eva.m sikkhitabba.m- 'indriyesu guttadvaaro
      bhavissaami, bhojane matta~n~nuu, jaagariya.m anuyutto, vipassako
      kusalaana.m dhammaana.m, pubbarattaapararatta.mbodhipakkhiyaana.m
      dhammaana.m bhaavanaanuyoga.m anuyutto viharissaamii'ti. Eva~nhi te,
      bhikkhu, sikkhitabba.m.

      AN 5.6.6


      "Yoniso vicine dhamma.m, pa~n~naayattha.m vipassati;"

      AN 7.1.3


      andhabhuuto aya.m loko, tanukettha vipassati;
      saku.no jaalamuttova, appo saggaaya gacchati.

      Dhp 174.


      Su~n~naagaara.m pavi.t.thassa, santacittassa bhikkhuno;
      amaanusii rati hoti, sammaa dhamma.m vipassato.

      Dhp 373.


      "Aaki~nca~n~nasambhava.m ~natvaa, nandii sa.myojana.m iti;
      evameta.m abhi~n~naaya, tato tattha vipassati;
      eta.m ~naa.na.m tatha.m tassa, braahma.nassa vusiimato"ti."

      SN 5.14


      And of course it is found in the Abhidhamma:

      Katamaa tasmi.m samaye vipassanaa hoti? Yaa tasmi.m samaye pa~n~naa
      pajaananaa vicayo pavicayo dhammavicayo sallakkha.naa upalakkha.naa
      paccupalakkha.naa pa.n.dicca.m kosalla.m nepu~n~na.m vebhabyaa cintaa
      upaparikkhaa bhuurii medhaa pari.naayikaa vipassanaa sampaja~n~na.m patodo
      pa~n~naa pa~n~nindriya.m pa~n~naabala.m pa~n~naasattha.m pa~n~naapaasaado
      pa~n~naa-aaloko pa~n~naa-obhaaso pa~n~naapajjotopa~n~naaratana.m amoho
      dhammavicayo sammaadi.t.thi- aya.m tasmi.m samaye vipassanaa hoti.

      DhS


      sa"nkhaare aniccatodukkhato anattato vipassati.

      Patthana


      The path of Vipassana is also found in detail in the Patisambhidamagga, but
      this is generally attributed to Sariputta.

      Suma"ngalaani,

      Yuttadhammo
    • Bhante Sujato
      Hello Fat Buddha fans, I have precisely no evidence for this, but i feel that it s very likely that the association between Maitreya and the fat man was
      Message 2 of 16 , May 1, 2005
        Hello Fat Buddha fans,

        I have precisely no evidence for this, but i feel that it's very
        likely that the association between Maitreya and the fat man was
        prompted purely by a pun: 'mettaayati'ti mettaa, 'it fattens, thus
        it's called mettaa'. Fat in Pali being of course 'meda'.

        Another interesting detail on this is that 'metteyya' in the Pali
        canon as far as i know is only used in conjunction with 'petteyya',
        meaning 'filial devotion to mother and father'. Thus the association
        of Metteyya Buddha with mettaa is possibly an incorrect reading. Of
        course the meaning is nice, in view of the association of the maataa
        with mettaa (and the overweight stature of the pregnant woman!)

        in Dhamma

        Bhante Sujato




        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, redxfist@a... wrote:
        > You'll often find the fat "monk" referred to Phra SangkaJai in
        Thailand.
        > There is a story behind him but I don't have time to write it
        now. If anyone
        > is interested I will though.
        >
        > Hope this helps.
        > David
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ong Yong Peng
        Dear Stephen, Frank and friends, in my humble opinion, I think the ongoing waves of Islamic terrorism is giving confidence to some Christian fundamentalist
        Message 3 of 16 , May 1, 2005
          Dear Stephen, Frank and friends,

          in my humble opinion, I think the ongoing waves of Islamic terrorism
          is giving confidence to some Christian fundamentalist groups. I am
          not writing very well on this since most are passing thoughts. I do
          think that top people in the Catholic Church takes this as an
          opportunity to reclaim the grounds they have lost in the past
          decades. As the richest and most powerful religious activists and
          lobbyists, they like to ensure that the Abrahamic faith is preserved
          exactly in the way they preferred, disregarding that its doctrinal
          foundation is shared by numerous religious denominations, all having
          very diverse views of most of the issues. I think there is a
          likelihood we see things coming round to a full circle, and it would
          trigger a new renaissance, only this time it will be a worldwide
          movement and most probably reduce religions to a bare social
          institution.

          The Buddhist stand on other religions is always embrace and respect,
          and this discussion hardly leads us to anything we want to achieve.
          So, I would suggest that we give the topic a rest, and resume our
          normal activities.


          metta,
          Yong Peng.
        • Dhammanando Bhikkhu
          Bhante, ... Perhaps the monk had in mind the Atthakathaas notion of a sutabuddha. cattaaro hi buddhaa: sutabuddho, catusaccabuddho, paccekabuddho,
          Message 4 of 16 , May 2, 2005
            Bhante,

            Ven. Yuttadhammo wrote:

            > A Sri Lankan monk once gave a lecture in Canada about what
            > the word Buddha means, and he said that he himself might be
            > considered "Buddha" because he had learned a lot in school.
            > Again, I think this is a misuse of the term...

            Perhaps the monk had in mind the Atthakathaas' notion of
            a sutabuddha.

            cattaaro hi buddhaa: sutabuddho, catusaccabuddho,
            paccekabuddho, sabba~n~nubuddho ti
            For [there are] four awakened ones: one awakened
            through learning; one awakened through the four
            truths; one awakened privately; one awakened
            through omniscience.

            tattha bahussuto bhikkhu "sutabuddho" naama.
            In this scheme a bhikkhu who has heard much is
            called "one awakened through learning".

            khii.naasavo "catusaccabuddho" naama.
            He in whom the pollutions are ended is called
            "one awakened through the four truths".

            kappasatasahassaadhikaani dve asa`nkhyeyyaani
            paaramiyo puuretvaa saama.m
            pa.tividdhapaccekabodhi~naa.no "paccekabuddho"
            naama.
            One who after fulfilling the perfections for two
            asankhyeyyas and one hundred thousand kappas,
            has by himself penetrated that knowledge
            called private awakening is called "one awakened
            privately".

            kappasatasahassaadhikaani cattaari vaa a.t.tha vaa
            so.lasa vaa asa`nkhyeyyaani paaramiyo puuretvaa
            ti.n.na.m maaraana.m matthaka.m madditvaa
            pa.tividdhasabba~n~nuta~n~naa.no
            "sabba~n~nubuddho" naama.
            One who after fulfilling the perfections for four,
            eight or sixteen asankhyeyyas and one hundred
            thousand kappas, and trampling on the head of the
            three Maaras, has by himself penetrated that
            knowledge called omniscience, is called an
            omniscient awakened one.

            imesu catuusu buddhesu sabba~n~nubuddhova adutiyo
            naama. na hi tena saddhi.m a~n~no sabba~n~nubuddho
            naama uppajjati.
            Among these four awakened ones, only the omniscient
            awakened one is called 'without a second', because
            another [person] called 'an omniscient awakened one'
            does not arise with him.
            (AA. i. 115)

            Best wishes,

            Dhammanando
          • Daniel
            Hello. I am not sure if the subject is appropriate for the group, if it is not, please see the post as irrelevant. Is it asserted by Theravada monks that
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
              Hello.

              I am not sure if the subject is appropriate for the group, if it is not, please
              see the post as irrelevant.





              Is it asserted by Theravada monks that Vipassana (of the Theravada tradition) is
              the original way to practice the Satipathana sutta? Or do they say it was
              "adapted", or alternatively "rediscovered"?


              I think Zen practice also is said to be based upon Satipathana sutta, though it
              is different from Vipassana. And I am not sure whether the Tibetan version of
              practice of "The four foundations of mindfulness" is the same as Vipassana
              approach.



              Have a good day

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            • "Kåre A. Lie"
              ... There is not ONE way to practice the Satipatthana sutta. There are different practical approaches, according to different teachers and their
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 6, 2006
                At 19:11 06.04.2006 +0300, you wrote:
                >Hello.
                >
                >I am not sure if the subject is appropriate for the group, if it is not,
                >please
                >see the post as irrelevant.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Is it asserted by Theravada monks that Vipassana (of the Theravada
                >tradition) is
                >the original way to practice the Satipathana sutta? Or do they say it was
                >"adapted", or alternatively "rediscovered"?

                There is not ONE way to practice the Satipatthana sutta. There are
                different practical approaches, according to different teachers and their
                interpretations.

                I suggest you read Jack Kornfield "Living Buddhist Masters", to find a good
                survey of some of those different approaches.

                Best regards,

                Kåre A. Lie
                http://www.lienet.no


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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