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Mahaasatipa.t.thaanasutta.m

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  • paulocuana
    Sahaayaa, Next week I ll be on a 10 day retreat. The theme of the retreat is the Four Foundations of Mindfulness. My question is: Ekaayano aya.m, bhikkhave,
    Message 1 of 32 , Apr 29, 2005
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      Sahaayaa,

      Next week I'll be on a 10 day retreat. The theme of the retreat is
      the Four Foundations of Mindfulness. My question is:

      "Ekaayano aya.m, bhikkhave, maggo sattaana.m visuddhiyaa,..."

      Is this the "only way" for the purification of beings or the "direct
      way"? I guess there are two questions here. One is textual, i.e.,
      what is being said here in Pali. The other refers to Buddhist
      practice:

      My feeling is that whatever method you use you have to end up here
      fully mindful and aware. So it is both the "only way" and
      the "direct way". For example, you could say that the practice of
      Jhaana is an "indirect way" of practice, and no less effective for
      this, which should ultimately lead to a state of full awareness,
      i.e., the "only way".

      I'm fully aware that I could have this in a complete muddle :)

      With Metta,
      Paul
    • Ong Yong Peng
      Dear Ven. Sujato, Ven. Yuttadhammo, Stephen and friends, Bhante, how true! It had never occurred to me that Dhammakaya is related to Chinese Buddhism. But,
      Message 32 of 32 , May 6, 2005
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        Dear Ven. Sujato, Ven. Yuttadhammo, Stephen and friends,

        Bhante, how true! It had never occurred to me that Dhammakaya is
        related to Chinese Buddhism. But, since you mention it, I believe it
        is making reference to the Tri-kaya concept (which isn't of Chinese
        origin) in Mahayana.

        I think they have probably got it wrong. The Dhammakaya (or
        Dharmakaya) is simply the embodiment of truth. It means that the
        enlightenment of all Buddhas are undiscriminatorily equal, regardless
        of time and space. If it insists a 'physical' state of nibbana, it
        should be the Sambhagakaya. The third kaya is the Nirmanakaya. This
        concept is important in Mahayana, and it blends in with the
        Madhyamika's explanation of emptiness.


        metta,
        Yong Peng.

        --- In Pali@yahoogroups.com, Bhante Sujato wrote:

        > > One very large group of "Buddhists" in Thailand has come out
        > > and proclaimed publicly that "Nibbana is Atta."

        It is worth noticing that this group emerged in Thailand as part of a
        movement in Thai culture from the 80's that started to re-acknowledge
        the Chinese roots of Thai culture. Bankok was in fact a Chinese
        trading port. One aspect of this is the adoption of aspects of
        Chinese Buddhism. For example, statues of Kwan Yin are common all
        over Thailand.

        But Dhammakaya has pursued this angle more consciously, claiming
        support for their Dhammakaya idea from Mahayana sutras.
        Unfortunately, few people in Thailand have read the Mahayana sutras,
        so apart from sectarian prejudice, they are unable to respond very
        meaningfully to this aspect of Dhammakaya's arguments.
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